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What would you expect to pay for a high junior A/O jumper horse?

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  • What would you expect to pay for a high junior A/O jumper horse?

    I know that the sky is the limit on this one and that there are so many variables, but I'm just trying to get an idea of what you may pay for a horse of this quality. Probably not a GP horse, but a very good 4'6 horse.

    I'm just curious more than anything.

  • #2
    A yr ago I went w/ someone to look at high jr a/o horses and they was being offered at anywhere from $35,000 to $200,000.. It really depends on their show record..They got theirs for $65,000 w/ a yr under him in the show ring.. So that should give you an idea.. Good Luck!!

    http://community.webshots.com/user/zedcadjna
    Let the horse go, get out of its way, it knows what to do...Stop pulling and keep kicking!!!!!!

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    • #3
      I do not know it this is much help or not but here it goes .... 2 years ago when I went shopping for one they showed us horses from 20k - 70k. These were horses that had been showed at A horse shows. There was a 30k horse that I tried that was a OTTB that could jump the moon but, was really hard to ride on the flat and was underweight.

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      • #4
        Up here, you'd probably need at least $100,000CDN.

        "Don't bother me; I'm living happily ever after!"

        Go Ahead: This is a dare, not permission. Don't Do It!

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        • #5
          a nice, ribboning at top-A-shows, not too difficult to ride, but not going to pack your butt around (not that anything really can) but not necessarily the winner jr jumper here is like 150K

          BoR:
          "I always feel like an idiot. But I am an idiot, so it kinda works out."--Billy Madison

          "A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject."--Churchill

          Um, I don\'t spell check. Deal with it.

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          • Original Poster

            #6
            What about a horse that is smaller than say 16'1? does that count against it? I hear that many people do not want to buy a smaller horse. For me, it's not an issue as long as the horse can make the strides, but I know that some people object. Any comment on that? I like to buy a horse that fits me and not worry about its size, but that's just me.

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            • #7
              Depends on age, experience, scope. I would say anywhere from $35,000-$85,000...more if it is younger and go up to the prixs and stuff. It all depends on who you buy from and how good you want it.

              Why is there so much month left at the end of the money?
              Why is there so much month left at the end of the money?

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              • #8
                calvaro-depends on its handiness. if a horse is really turny and can make the inside turns and has the scope to jump a 4'6"+ fence off of one crooked stride, then it might even be worth more. most people like bigger horses, though,because you have a larger resale market (small people can ride big horses, but not the other way around always), and not all small horses can get inside, but even a large strided small horse might not be able to *leave out* strides, only get down long lines or take the lesser option at a halfstride. Big horses, when they cant get insdie, can cover a lot of ground going around.

                BoR:
                "I always feel like an idiot. But I am an idiot, so it kinda works out."--Billy Madison

                "A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject."--Churchill

                Um, I don\'t spell check. Deal with it.

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                • Original Poster

                  #9
                  I'm assuming that horses in Europe of such quality can be purchased for much less.

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                  • #10
                    A horse that can jump a legitimate 4 foot 6 (1.40 meter) course with an amateur in the saddle and leave all the rails up is not going to sell for less than $125k unless there are other problems of the major sort lurking in there (soundness, bad temerament, old age, etc.).

                    However, there are very few amateurs who actually ride at 1.4 meters. Many say the do, or that they are going to. But, look at those classes at actual shows and you'll notice two things. One, there are many times more riders in the smaller amateur classes. Two, these classes are rarely if ever 1.4 meters. Except at Indio, for example, a "4 foot 6" amateur classs might have one 4 foot 5 vertical and the rest of the fences substantially smaller. Make them bigger, a real 1.40 meters, and outside of Indio (or the Florida circuits), the ammies start falling off left and right. Course designers are not wanting that, nor are show organizers!

                    So a horse that is only going to need to jump "amateur 4 foot 6" (which is more like 1.3 meters, in actuality) is probably in the $75k range.

                    I get more than a few ammies coming through the barn who want to "jump the big fences." Before we send them off seeking a horse that can do 1.40 meters properly (let alone bigger stuff), we sit them on one of the boys and have them actually jump this height fence. Oxers, not verticals. It doesn't take a magical ride to get Capone over 1.4 meter oxer!

                    Most every one realizes that they have years of work to do before they can really ride at 1.4 meters or higher. It's far better to ride at 1.3 or 1.2 well and build a foundation than it is to move up to 1.4 and flail miserably. It's also a waste of money (and equine talent) to take a 1.5 meter horse and run him silly around 1.4 meter classes with a frightened ammie in the saddle.

                    Anyway, my $0.02.

                    Regards,

                    D. Spink

                    ++++++++++++++++++++++++
                    Hengststation Exitpoint
                    home of Holsteiner jumpingstallions Capone I and Cantour. . . and, soon, German jumping pony Neuville!

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                    • #11
                      there is a horse that i have been riding who is a GORGEOUS warmblood, sweet as can be, scopey, powerful jumper who is going for only 30k because he hasnt shown that much and is "hard" to ride. and i put that in quotes cause ive heard from otehr people that he was a tough ride, but he was amazing and fun to ride the 6 times that i rode/jumped him

                      *Tipperary*
                      anyone who says they made a small fortune in the horse business probably started with a large fortune.
                      *Tipperary*
                      anyone who says they made a small fortune in the horse business probably started with a large fortune.

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                      • #12
                        <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Calvaro V:
                        I'm assuming that horses in Europe of such quality can be purchased for much less.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

                        I'd be careful with that assumption - yeah, they might be cheaper, but sometimes you get what you pay for. It's not a bad idea - I bought mine there for pretty cheap - his price doubled the minute he landed on US soil, and I had offers for as much as four times what I paid for him within a few months.

                        My advice to you if you are thinking of going over there is to get a good trainer and/or agent to help you out. A rule of thumb to keep in mind is that if it was that good of a horse, they'd want to keep it over there.

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                        • #13
                          D Spinks - How do you know the course's aren't actually 4'6"? I'm not questioning your statement, just wondering if this was common knowledge (I'd never heard it but have a long way to go before I get to that level )

                          And if it is true - why are we dumbing down the AO courses? Aren't we setting people up to be hurt?
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                          • #14
                            <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by nycjumper:
                            D Spinks - How do you know the course's aren't actually 4'6"? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

                            I wonder the same thing. The shows I've been to, the courses are set at the max, especially if the division is split between highs and lows, the highs are typically set at the max.

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                            • #15
                              I did the Ao's in the Midwest and those jumps were every inch of 4'6! There are a bunch of horses in those classes that have done Gp's and they need every amount of jump they can get.

                              "What are you liberals so afraid of?"--Anne Colter
                              http://community.webshots.com/user/mmreca

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                              • #16
                                My friend bought an OTTB as a child/adult jumper prospect. Kept upping the fences and it kept clearing them. Sold as a section 5 (4'6) jumper 3 years after buying it from the track. She was selling in the range of $35,000 Canadian (TB's dont usually go as much as WBs), it took a while to sell him but he is now a happy 4'6 jumper winning most of his classes.

                                *Cody* Halfsteiner Jumper Extrordinaire!
                                *Bailey* The Ultimate Track Trash TB Hunter!

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                                • #17
                                  D. Spink - I don't know what shows you are talking about! The vast majority of times I have walked into a high jr/ao class or a high prelim, the courses are set to specs. 1.3m for "amateur 4.6?" Gimme a break! Most shows have them built up to the same specs as the preliminaries.. "professional 4'6"

                                  And your little comment about amateurs falling off left and right at 4'6" is certainly ridiculous. Just in the northeast alone.. HITS, Lake Placid, Vermont.. solid A/O riders.

                                  --------------------------
                                  I would sooner fail than not be among the greatest
                                  -- John Keats
                                  --------------------------
                                  I would sooner fail than not be among the greatest
                                  -- John Keats

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                                  • #18
                                    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by nycjumper:
                                    D Spinks - How do you know the course's aren't actually 4'6"? I'm not questioning your statement, just wondering if this was common knowledge (I'd never heard it but have a long way to go before I get to that level )<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

                                    Perhaps things are very different back East; my firsthand experience comes from the West coast. I've ridden these classes in previous years (before slipping down the slippery slope into "pro land"), and I still walk most of the courses at shows just to keep a finger on the pulse.

                                    Over the winter, I started carrying a tape measure with me when setting schooling fences. I marked all of our standards with 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, and 1.55 heights in permanent marker, and rarely a day goes by that I'm not measuring the width of an oxer we've set in training. I also carry a smaller tape measure at shows, just out of curiosity and in order to keep my "eye" accurate when gauging height and width.

                                    Again, perhaps things are much different in the East (the last time I rode competitively back there was in the early '80s, in hunterland anyway), but here we have "Grand Prix" classes advertised as "4 foot 3" and only a few that are actually 1.45 meters (4 foot 9) outside of Spruce.

                                    So, for the East Coasters, if you guys are seeing a different situation in the high amateurs I offer my apologies! I can't have a meanigful opinion on things I don't know, and I don't know the amateur classes back east (or in the midwest, for the most part, outside of Spruce which is sort of midwest).

                                    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>And if it is true - why are we dumbing down the AO courses? Aren't we setting people up to be hurt?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

                                    This is a good question, worthy of its own thread. Alas, I've got three stallions to collect and a Fedex deadline looming so it's off the computer for me.

                                    Regards,

                                    D. Spink

                                    ++++++++++++++++++++++++
                                    Hengststation Exitpoint
                                    home of Holsteiner jumpingstallions Capone I and Cantour. . . and, soon, German jumping pony Neuville!

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Seriously, it depends on where you want to do the high Jr or A/O. If you want to do them at regular A shows, you're talking a not-quite-good-enough for the GP horse. That's anywhere from $50-200K, depending on your area, how lucky you get, and how many problems you want to put up with, including, age, soundness, or "quirks". For instance, many of the horses that won't jump the open water get sold down to the smaller A shows, where they never see a water jump (sometimes that's a big surprise when the buyer decides to move up to the bigger shows, and the ingate guy says "oh no, not that one again" ).
                                      However, if you want to do the A/O at WEF, or to a lesser extent Lake Placid (or Indio, I guess, never having been there), you need a legitimate GP horse (200K++), especially if your amateur or junior makes mistakes. The high A/O there is the equivalent of most GP's elsewhere in the country, and significantly higher and wider, as well as more technical than the jr or a/o division elsewhere. That's a call people have to make, whether they really want the horse that can do the highs in Fl, or if they're comfortable doing the mediums or lows in Fl, and moving up to the highs elsewhere. That's basically what I did when I had jumpers, showed in the lows and mediums all winter, and then did the highs at Culpeper or Catskills or VT in the summer. The downside of this strategy is that horses (and riders) that qualify for indoors or devon this way are usually at best unprepared and at worst completely overfaced when they get there.

                                      http://community.webshots.com/user/anallie

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                                      • #20
                                        <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Calvaro V:
                                        I'm assuming that horses in Europe of such quality can be purchased for much less.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

                                        yes and no - depends on to whom you need to pay a commission... As well as the value of the dollar!

                                        Check the classifieds in the Horse & Hound!!

                                        Irish horses definitely range in $$ - my trainer just sold a WONDERFUL horse as an Eventer (he was winning at US Preliminary *) - but it also had good jumper mileage, and a number of SJ points - was competing at 1.2-1.3, and doing well, expecially in the speeds... He was expensive by Irish standards, but well under the six figures some people are talking here! (around Euro 35-40,000) I have no clue how much the final purchaser paid for him...

                                        Again, it depends on your "agent", "broker", "trainer" and your trainer's friends....

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