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Thermal had a class called "Beginner Walk"

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  • #41
    Originally posted by PonyPenny View Post
    I believe the comments against are because HITS Thermal is a AA rated show, not a local h/j show.
    Ahh. OK. I guess I can see why that is different, but the Walk class itself isn't AA rated so why does it matter?
    Proud member of the COTH Junior (and Junior-at-Heart!) clique!

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    • #42
      My one and only foray into Riding In A Show was a walk only class at a rescue's benefit show. As an adult.

      I thought I was going to die. Horse was very good. There were about 12 in the class (all adults), we did not place. Rode out of the ring and said "Well, that's now crossed off my list."

      I was glad I did it. As someone who doesn't show, the anticipation and prep was tremendous fun. I can only imagine it's a hundred times more so for young kids and their (perhaps non-horsey) parents. Everyone starts somewhere. Do you want young fans/ participants or not?
      It's a uterus, not a clown car. - Sayyedati

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      • #43
        Dags had a point about the safety problem.

        I understand kids, clients and trainers wanting to find a divi$ion for the newest riders in the barn. But if you can't trot (for the love of God) it sounds pretty dangerous to have you turned loose, too. How does anyone make sure these ponies never go above the walk? The riders don't sound capable.
        The armchair saddler
        Politically Pro-Cat

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        • #44
          Originally posted by PonyPenny View Post
          What about the .65 meter (2') jumper class at Thermal that everyone who gets around clean and within the time gets a blue ribbon? I could not figure out how all 15 entries won first until it was explained to me. There is also cross rails and adult cross rails which also seems a bid odd.
          Level 0s (.80) and Level 1s (.95) are also "blue ribbon" rounds at Thermal. Although the 2' jumpers is ammy only...whereas the others are open. I just don't understand why they don't judge based on optimum time, instead. That encourages both clean rounds and safe pace.

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          • #45
            I always joked that I could be "world champion walk rider" ..... The joke mostly being based in the assumption it didn't exist. I stand corrected. So no age restrictions? They will take someone pushing 30 in this? Sweet...I can get all the ribbons.

            I also joked about maybe making it to the -1 jumpers one day, after seeing the 2' in the HITS prize list.

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            • #46
              Originally posted by julipido View Post
              Level 0s (.80) and Level 1s (.95) are also "blue ribbon" rounds at Thermal. Although the 2' jumpers is ammy only...whereas the others are open. I just don't understand why they don't judge based on optimum time, instead. That encourages both clean rounds and safe pace.
              Which is funny to think that someone doing level 7 jumpers could do the Level 0's and Level 1's. At least you would be guaranteed a blue ribbon, which to some people that is all that matters.

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              • #47
                Originally posted by PonyPeep View Post
                Ahh. OK. I guess I can see why that is different, but the Walk class itself isn't AA rated so why does it matter?
                I suppose it doesn't matter, but it used to be you had to earn your may to compete at a A rated show. It looked like most of the kids borrowed ponies to go in the class, so it wasn't like a parent paid for stabling, braiding, show fees, etc., just to go in the walk class. It is judged, so everyone does not get a blue ribbon like leadline.

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                • #48
                  Originally posted by Horseymama View Post
                  I'm not sure if I had shelled out the money to go to an A show that I would want a schooling show with a bunch of crazy kids and hairy school horses running around in the middle of it. They can always come and watch the show, why do they have to be in it if they are not ready for it?
                  How elitist. You want a special show all to yourself so you can have bragging rights to it, no "hairy" ponies are allowed to attend because the addition of hair somehow decreases the right of someone to be there, although they sure can come watch you be special.

                  I agree that people shouldn't be at a show if they can't control their horses, but we're talking kids on ponies in a ring all by themselves not anywhere close to where the "real" people are showing.

                  It's an opportunity for the show to make some more money while taking advantage of the people that are probably already there and want to have some fun. How do you think shows stay in business?

                  I don't see how a pony WALKING a couple rounds suffers more then a horse campaigning at 3 feet or 3' 6"

                  The fact is that the world has moved on from the age people looked back on with rose colored glasses.
                  http://weanieeventer.blogspot.com/

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                  • #49
                    Originally posted by danceronice View Post
                    if you're hauling Mom/the older kids/the horses off to the rated show and younger kid wants to do something, and people will pay for it, you can't blame the show managers for making money.
                    I would guess this is why the class was developed. People asked for it.

                    It gets entries, it causes no harm, why complain?


                    Knowing nothing more about the all blue ribbon jumper divisions than what was posted here I will make the guess that this was started because there was so much complaint about so many jumper riders not having basics and speeding around the lower level classes dangerously instead of technically. Making the classes so that clear rounds (not just the speediest clear round) is rewarded is probably one technique to deal with the scary atmosphere that was developing.

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                    • #50
                      Here's a shocker from the good old days that people under 35 might not remember, but we didn't have a the low jumper classes, because the Equitation divisions started out being the way to ride technical jumper like courses with elegance and a safe speed. These more than anything brought up the generation of amazing riders that went before. Equitation was NOT a class for giant flat jumpers with riders poised up on their backs.

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                      • #51
                        QUOTE=Horseymama;6880058]
                        I'm not sure if I had shelled out the money to go to an A show that I would want a schooling show with a bunch of crazy kids and hairy school horses running around in the middle of it. Some of those school horses are retired A horses/ponies. If you saw them outside the ring, I doubt you could pick out who was the grand school master. "Hair school horses" , please. Some big barn lesson ponies/horses are better turned out than some division ones. They can always come and watch the show, why do they have to be in it if they are not ready for it? Clearly they are ready for the walk class, you just don't like it, and that is fine. I am not "thrilled" but it hurts no one.

                        I think A shows should be a little more special. What happened to barns that have a show trainer and a home trainer? Economic times have killed that. Top barns still have that but they are few and far between, from what I have seen. If you have worked hard and have the time and budget you go to a show or two with the show trainer. If you don't have the time or the horse or the money, you stay home and ride with the home trainer, maybe you go to some schooling shows, you work on your riding, you train your young horse, whatever. Not everyone is entitled to participate. Apparently, if they can pay the fees, management feels they ARE entitiled to participate, hair school pony and all. If that helps the shows stay in business and "possibly" keeps fees from creeping up (if that is possibe), who are we to begrudge it?

                        And you know who suffers in all of this? The horses. I'll bite. Are you inferring that the beginner class is what is causing the drugging? How are the horses suffering because Susie Q shows in beginner off lead? Drugging, unfortunately exists in the low, mid and high level. [/QUOTE]

                        eh hem.... While I agree that A shows have morphed into something that "back in the day", would have NEVER have happened, and safety should be paramount.... I found this post interesting. Blue is mine. I am in the camp of raising an eyebrow when I see these classes.

                        I can see the side of "it dumbs down the sport", but in a time when shows and trainers are trying to stay in business, if these classes can be done safely and allow me to still be able to go to some nice shows with my AA hunter (who shows in rated), I am OK with it. If someone is not, avoid the hairy school horses and little up downers.

                        It is sad that some nice shows just can't make it in these economic times. Like most businesses, some are just trying to stay afloat.

                        Drugging the horses, a whole different train wreck.
                        -
                        Come to the dark side, we have cookies

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                        • #52
                          Originally posted by Martha Drum View Post
                          I don't show, so no dog in this fight, but that phrase just jumped out at me because it perfectly describes my LIFE!

                          Horse-crazy lesson kids, hairy schoolies, & crazy AND hairy me on 43 acres within sight of the Blue Ridge...livin' the dream! (and I do mean that sincerely)
                          That sounds like so much fun! And a great place for kids (and adults) to get their start.
                          You have to have experiences to gain experience.

                          1998 Morgan mare Mythic Feronia "More Valley Girl Than Girl Scout!"

                          Comment


                          • #53
                            Originally posted by Snowfox View Post
                            Here's a shocker from the good old days that people under 35 might not remember, but we didn't have a the low jumper classes, because the Equitation divisions started out being the way to ride technical jumper like courses with elegance and a safe speed. These more than anything brought up the generation of amazing riders that went before. Equitation was NOT a class for giant flat jumpers with riders poised up on their backs.
                            Did you also walk 10 miles uphill (both ways) in the snow to get to school?

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                            • #54
                              Originally posted by PaintPony View Post
                              Did you also walk 10 miles uphill (both ways) in the snow to get to school?
                              No but my horse and I did ride the elevators to the Maclay finals! Now get off my lawn.

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                              • #55
                                Originally posted by PaintPony View Post
                                Did you also walk 10 miles uphill (both ways) in the snow to get to school?
                                Barefoot, remember, and everyone back then cleaned their tack with a toothbrush!
                                http://www.youtube.com/user/supershorty628
                                Proudly blogging for The Chronicle of the Horse!

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                                • #56
                                  Originally posted by Snowfox View Post
                                  No but my horse and I did ride the elevators to the Maclay finals! Now get off my lawn.
                                  If only there were elevators for all the equipment, instead of that five story ramp at the Garden.

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                                  • #57
                                    Originally posted by supershorty628 View Post
                                    Barefoot, remember, and everyone back then cleaned their tack with a toothbrush!
                                    Key word in the sentence "Everyone". Not "the groom". And your trainer told you to get back in there and use the brass/silver cleaner if things didn't sparkle.

                                    I'm so old, when I did leadline, they actually PLACED the class. Yes, little kids got red, yellow, white, pink, and green. It also mark my first brush with hunter ring politics, as I always placed 2nd behind the girl almost falling off and slumped over b/c her mom as really, really pretty with really, really big boobs and the show manager always was wanting to give her a kiss on the cheek and felt he could only do that if daughter won.

                                    IT'S CALLED CHARACTER BUILDING!!!!

                                    And whoever called it a Divi$ion - loves it. And the $1M Walk World Championship? *claps* I enjoy a little sarcasm this early in the AM.

                                    Now, from the business perspective, if people want to shell out the cash for it... by all means. *shrug*

                                    Comment


                                    • #58
                                      Originally posted by Pennywell Bay View Post
                                      QUOTE=Horseymama;6880058]

                                      I think A shows should be a little more special. What happened to barns that have a show trainer and a home trainer? Economic times have killed that. Top barns still have that but they are few and far between, from what I have seen. If you have worked hard and have the time and budget you go to a show or two with the show trainer. If you don't have the time or the horse or the money, you stay home and ride with the home trainer, maybe you go to some schooling shows, you work on your riding, you train your young horse, whatever. Not everyone is entitled to participate. Apparently, if they can pay the fees, management feels they ARE entitiled to participate, hair school pony and all. If that helps the shows stay in business and "possibly" keeps fees from creeping up (if that is possibe), who are we to begrudge it?
                                      In my area this is definitely what is going on. We have a good schooling show circuit that must be carefully be scheduled around rated shows within about an 8 hour driving radius (and college football, but that's a separate topic).

                                      Top barns still have the trainers who go to shows and the trainers who stay home, but most trainers I see in my area do not have this. They go to both the rated and the schooling shows to meet the needs of all of their customers. Except the customers who don't show, I suppose...

                                      I think it depends on what the goal of the program is, and the goal of many programs now is showing. How many years do most kids/new riding adults ride before they show? I spent my entire first year of lessons on the lunge line when I was a kid, which has paid off immensely in terms of how I ride now, and I don't think I did cross rails until maybe my third year of lessons. I can't see most parents and/or kids going for that today.

                                      Comment


                                      • #59
                                        Originally posted by Silk View Post
                                        Why do you guys care? If it makes money to support the shows and it allows people to enjoy it, why not?
                                        If it brings them into the sport for the long term, and starts a long, fruitful, lifelong relationship with horses, then bravo.

                                        If what it does is fleece the parents out of money before their child can even canter a course of fences, and sour them on the hassle and expense of a weeklong away show, causing them to leave the sport before the child ever is able to actually ride, then it's a bad thing.
                                        If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket

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                                        • #60
                                          I think it's ridiculous. If you can't walk trot and canter your horse, you shouldn't be at a show (much less a rated show). Personally, I think lead line and walk-trot should be out too.

                                          However, since lead line & walk-trot are long established and not going anywhere, why not have a walk class and maybe even a walk over poles class...

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