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Girth-y horse WDYD

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  • Girth-y horse WDYD

    I brought my post back from the past because I am still having trouble with my poor horse.

    He is doing much better since the chiro - but tried a mohair girth and no luck. He was stiff with this girth and the saddle slipped back.

    I broke down and just ordered the Mikmar comfort girth... PRICEY uggg... I sure hope it works if not I guess it will be on ebay.

    I notice when the girth is tight my horse moves stiff in the beginning. I really feel it's his muscles where his sternum is. He is very narrow there or maybe his back. I am going to have him looked at today again by the vet....

    Just feel so bad for him because he's not trying to be a bad horse... he just hurts someplace.

    Any other ideas would be really appreciated!!!




    Well title says it. Horse doesn't like to be girthed. Use a sheepskin girth, go up very slowly and he "deals" with it...

    What kind of girths have you found work with the sensitive guys?
    Last edited by doublesstable; Apr. 11, 2013, 12:45 PM.
    Live in the sunshine.
    Swim in the sea.
    Drink the wild air.

  • #2
    I would first rule out any stomach/ulcer related issues. Some horses who have such reactions to the girth being tightened are saying "ouch that hurts!" Others who are girthy have skin that is being pinched. So, keep doing as you do with going up slowly and be sure you're alternating sides with elastic on both sides so you can go up evenly. Then help him get a nice stretch by pulling his front legs forward to make sure his skin is not pinched under the girth. Also, never get mad at him for having a reaction to getting his girth tightened. He is allowed to express himself as long as he doesn't aim at you.

    Comment


    • #3
      A lot of horses are better if you do the little things that could make a difference;
      1. Try doing to slower than normal.
      2. Try to put the girth on outside of the barn (Have someone hold your horse)
      3. Tighten one notch, walk, tighten one notch, walk.

      Patience may be your friend!
      Save The Date 08-15-2011

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #4
        He was scoped a few months ago and doesn't have any other signs of ulcers. I did leave a message for the chiro - maybe a rib issue?

        Since I have owned this horse (purchased him in August 2012) about six months the first time we saddled him he leaped up. And the guys didn't go too quickly with the girth.

        I do use a Edgewood sheepskin girth with elastic on both sides right now.

        I did read something about tight muscles so when I see him next I will try a massage.

        We never get mad at him, it's not his fault.. he is trying to tell us something just figuring it out is the fun part.

        Thanks for your help.
        Live in the sunshine.
        Swim in the sea.
        Drink the wild air.

        Comment


        • #5
          My mare has rib issues so she worries about having her girth fastened even when its so loose there's air between the girth & her belly. I have her in a neoprene girth with double sided elastic. We usually take about 6 adjustments to get her girth to riding tight.

          As oversimple as this is, I switched to a girth that was long enough that I ride at 5 holes up on either side and reward her with a small treat after fastening the girth (at 1 hole on each side) and for the first couple of adjustments. It took a little time but now she sees me pick up the girth, pricks her ears and starts chewing.

          Comment


          • #6
            ^^^^ this. I use a double elastic neoprene, but also a fuzzy girth cover. Girth is long enough that it can be very loose on first attachment. Then, gradually tighten with treats. I take my time, and give him time to "process" after each tightening and treat. I also walk away and busy myself with other stuff for a minute or two after the initial attachment. Then he is looking for me and his next treat to come back to him in the crossties.

            He also likes his very fuzzy Fleeceworks sheepskin pad.
            Rest in peace Claudius, we will miss you.

            Comment


            • #7
              One thing I have found to be careful of when using a girth that has elastic on both sides, is that it is easy to over tighten.

              I love the double ended elastic fleece girths for schooling, because I just throw them in the wash after I ride, but I have to be mindful not to tighten too much.
              FREE TACK/APPAREL ADS: BITS AND BARTER BOARD: http://bitsandbarter.proboards.com/i...ay&thread=5450

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              • #8
                I like the neoprene girths for girthy horses because I feel like I can ride them with a slightly looser girth because the neoprene reduces the slip.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Is he girthy otherwise? Any reactions when you groom the area? Can you pet/rub there? From one side under the bottom to the other? I'm just curious, I have no helpful suggestions other than what's been listed here .

                  It does make me want to get a longer girth...we have to streeeeetch to get the first hole when putting on Rory's current girth. I kinda feel like I'm being unfair now, even though all he does it give me a "really?" face. Good luck!
                  COTH's official mini-donk enabler

                  "I am all for reaching out, but in some situations it needs to be done with a rolled up news paper." Alagirl

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                  • Original Poster

                    #10
                    The more I think about it and read here, the more I think it is pain related not just sensitivity.

                    On the girth; I custom ordered a 58" Edgewood sheepskin and it is roomy enough to girth up slowly. That's actually why I got it LOL because that struggle with one of my other horses just to get it in the holes because he was such a bloater.... thank goodness my bloater horse is NOT a girthy horse. That would be lots of fun...

                    I wont see him again until Thursday. He's at a show so I will check out the area to see if it's abnormally sensitive. I did rub him softly around that area as the groom was saddling to help calm him, fed him cookies and that worked pretty good. I didn't notice him being sensitive in the girth area but I really didn't poke around. The grooms are super aware of his issue and take their time with him. They will walk him and go up slowly for him.

                    I just have to figure out why he is hurting. I had one horse that I got that was a bit girthy and over time he got better. But I did chiro, massage, changed his diet and used elastic ended girths in which his previous owner rode Dressage so I wonder if that had any relevance? I had to custom order this horse a girth too, a 60" LOL. But I did so many different things I really don't know which of them worked because that particular horse is fine now.

                    Thanks so much for your ideas and thoughts.
                    Live in the sunshine.
                    Swim in the sea.
                    Drink the wild air.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      My horse is really girthy and extremely offended about being girthed (to the point that he will sometimes attempt to "grab" me with a front leg when I go to do up the girth!). In his case, it is somewhat justified as of late because he recently had a major overgirthing incident that caused massive hematomas in his girth area (long story, and old news that I don't feel like getting into).

                      I have found that his problem is actually that his conformation makes him especially prone to the girth being VERY tight at the very bottom (sternum area) and loose on the sides. So, people tend to want to overtighten because they don't realize how tight it is on the bottom.

                      Anyway, after his recent "incident" I started riding him in a mohair girth, which molds to him a little bit better. I try to girth him up slowly, and, as others mentioned, I give him breaks between tightenings where I go away completely (put my helmet on, etc.). He also objects somewhat less to having the girth tightened when he is not in the cross ties, for whatever reason. I think it might be that he is more comfortable if he has his head down low while it is tightened.

                      I did just have him chriopracted last week and he had two ribs out. This is a pretty routine finding for him at every chiro appointment, so he may have consistent rib pain that bothers him.

                      He is also really sensitive about grooming or any kind of touching in that area.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        What about his back? Pain in the back (from the wither to sacro iliac) can cause a horse to be girthy.
                        ~ Enjoying some guac and boxed wine at the Blue Saddle inn. ~

                        Originally posted by LauraKY
                        I'm sorry, but this has "eau de hoarder" smell all over it.
                        HORSING mobile training app

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                        • #13
                          Have you considered that he might be "cold backed"? My medium pony was, no sensitive areas, just didn't to be warmed up to put weight on her back or tighten girth completely.

                          For me, I learned to brush off saddle area first, then put on saddle, brush mail, fasten girth with it not touching belly. Went up on hole every time I did something. By the time she was tacked up, the girth was still quite loose by riding standards. would get on and slowly tighten as we walked around.

                          In the winter she was much worse that in the summer, but even then still had to go slow. However, she was fine to retack at the ring for the under saddle as long as she had all ready been ridden. (After the model in the morning, you still had to go slow).

                          It may simply not be a pain thing, but simply uncomfortable until he is warmed up.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Are you positive you have a well fitting saddle? That's always the first thing I'd want to check, then move on the other ideas...
                            "On the back of a horse I felt whole, complete, connected to that vital place in the center of me...and the chaos within me found balance."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              My horse is quite girthy, too. I thought maybe it was ulcers. But recently he was diagnosed with cervical arthritis, and that is one of the symptoms that is described for it. I also agree with the other poster who've said they've had this issue because the back or ribs are out of alignment. You might discuss this with your vet.

                              Comment

                              • Original Poster

                                #16
                                Originally posted by Ainsley688 View Post
                                Are you positive you have a well fitting saddle? That's always the first thing I'd want to check, then move on the other ideas...

                                Yeah I have a CWD that has been fitted to him.

                                I do notice under his belly on the bottom where the girth goes is thin (he has a narrow conformation)... like FineAlready says it may be conformation combined with a rib issue. And that area right between the front legs but back where the girth goes can get a tad swollen; not after the saddle but when you get him out.

                                I did call the chiro who is also a vet and maybe that is something that will help.
                                Live in the sunshine.
                                Swim in the sea.
                                Drink the wild air.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  I had a long talk with my vet about this "rib out" business that chiros promote. I don't believe in it.

                                  In my horse's case (see above), bone scan revealed nothing in his neck or withers as we had suspected. It did show a hot spot at T18 (near back of saddle). Ultrasound of spine showed arthritic changes at that location, so we did u/s guided injections which seem to be helping him.
                                  Rest in peace Claudius, we will miss you.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by ToTheNines View Post
                                    I had a long talk with my vet about this "rib out" business that chiros promote. I don't believe in it.

                                    In my horse's case (see above), bone scan revealed nothing in his neck or withers as we had suspected. It did show a hot spot at T18 (near back of saddle). Ultrasound of spine showed arthritic changes at that location, so we did u/s guided injections which seem to be helping him.
                                    My horse is only chiropracted by a vet (a great vet from a great clinic). I'm not sure how you can "not believe" in this "rib out business" if you have ever seen a horse get adjusted. I knew one of my horse's right ribs was out before his appointment on Thursday. When a rib is adjusted, it is very obvious and the horse gets relief immediately. Mine holds his breath just before the adjustment, the adjustment is a very distinct "popping" movement, and then he lets out a huge sigh afterward and licks/chews. He also immediately becomes less touchy in the girth area.

                                    Comment

                                    • Original Poster

                                      #19
                                      Originally posted by FineAlready View Post
                                      My horse is only chiropracted by a vet (a great vet from a great clinic). I'm not sure how you can "not believe" in this "rib out business" if you have ever seen a horse get adjusted. I knew one of my horse's right ribs was out before his appointment on Thursday. When a rib is adjusted, it is very obvious and the horse gets relief immediately. Mine holds his breath just before the adjustment, the adjustment is a very distinct "popping" movement, and then he lets out a huge sigh afterward and licks/chews. He also immediately becomes less touchy in the girth area.
                                      I like you use a chiro/vet and agree that once you see it with your own eyes it's amazing.

                                      I have never had the rib out issue (yet)? But sacroiliac many times and jaw, neck too and I have always been a believer because of what I have seen.
                                      Live in the sunshine.
                                      Swim in the sea.
                                      Drink the wild air.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        If he is sensitive on his sternum you can try a Gibaud girth. It has this big soft elastic piece over the sternum. My horse LOVES it. It's definitely not cheap (about $250) but well worth it.
                                        \"In all manners of opinion, our adversaries are insane.\" Mark Twain

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