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Critique My Riding

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  • Critique My Riding

    Hi. I've posted quite a few threads so sorry if I am bothering anyone. I have made a video for a working student position. I tried to make it as professional as a I can. If you were looking for a working student at professional show barn, would you consider hiring me? Do you think that this video is professional enough? Also, please don't judge me on the classes I was showing in. There are/were all young horses and were at the cross-rail or 18' level. That doesn't mean that I am on that level. As a trainer, please tell me an honest opinion of my riding. Thank you! Here is the link to the video:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vT9zzeC0VuA

  • #2
    I'm no professional, and I haven't spent a lot of time at show barns, so take this for what it's worth! First, there is a typo in your intro ("working sudent"). Second, if you are capable of riding horses at a higher level I would suggest doing anything possible to get some video, or at a bare minimum, pictures, of you doing such. Even if you have to pay someone to ride their higher level horse or something, if you are serious I think it would be money well spent. I won't presume to critique your riding, but I think you look quite capable on young/green horses. It would however be nice to show the full range of your abilities. Good luck!

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #3
      Originally posted by Tuesday's Child View Post
      I'm no professional, and I haven't spent a lot of time at show barns, so take this for what it's worth! First, there is a typo in your intro ("working sudent"). Second, if you are capable of riding horses at a higher level I would suggest doing anything possible to get some video, or at a bare minimum, pictures, of you doing such. Even if you have to pay someone to ride their higher level horse or something, if you are serious I think it would be money well spent. I won't presume to critique your riding, but I think you look quite capable on young/green horses. It would however be nice to show the full range of your abilities. Good luck!
      Ok thanks. That's a good idea, to ride an upper level horse. I just need to find one.....I will look into that! But thank you for your input.

      Comment


      • #4
        I would like to see more professional video (or at least more clear and steady!) as well as a more professional appearance. It's great that you can ride the greenies but I would want to see you jumping higher.
        Charlie Brown (1994 bay TB X gelding)
        White Star (2004 grey TB gelding)

        Mystical Moment, 1977-2010.

        Comment

        • Original Poster

          #5
          Originally posted by AliCat518 View Post
          I would like to see more professional video (or at least more clear and steady!) as well as a more professional appearance. It's great that you can ride the greenies but I would want to see you jumping higher.
          Okay. I wish I had the horse that could go higher. I have jumped up to 3'6 but on someone else's horse, who isn't at my stable anymore.

          Comment


          • #6
            Yeah, I would like a shorter video of you riding at whatever the highest level you are capable of. And, no T-shirts. Wear a polo shirt or some other shirt with collar.

            If whomever is hiring is getting a lot of applicants, I would be concerned that the first impression you make - that of riding in a 18" class - would cause the person in charge of hiring to skim by you. Good luck!
            Unrepentant carb eater

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Tuesday's Child View Post
              First, there is a typo in your intro ("working sudent").
              Also, the single tick mark ' indicates feet - not inches. To write out that you were showing in an 18 inch class, it would be written 18".

              Good luck with your search! I have no idea what kind of video is required for that...?

              Comment


              • #8
                No. The single most important thing on a green horse is straightness. 18" jumps aren't a deal killer, but not being in the middle of them is. You look nice on a horse, so put together a video where you ride with more attention to detail. Straight lines, straight jumps, straight landings.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Another thing to add to the already good points: your video is just plain too long. Nine minutes is outrageously long... 2 1/2 minutes, max. Unless you're Beezie Madden, I don't want to watch 9 minutes of you riding.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I like the idea of showing you on different horses, but be very careful about your wording. The "unbroke" Appy is trotting and cantering.

                    I would cut the video down in time, and show short clips of riding different horses. Like others have said, pay attention to detail on picking the BEST clips. Good position, distance, track (straight) is more important that height. However, if this pro barn is hoping to have the working student show the 3' and 3'6 horses then you should find one where you can demonstrate a few jumps on.

                    Also, be clear on your abilities. I would much rather have an honest novice rider apply than a novice rider who says they can do more than they can. Work ethic, trainability and humbleness is often more important than being able to ride at "x" level already.

                    Comment

                    • Original Poster

                      #11
                      Thanks for the critique. I will go back and fixt the problems on the video and make it shorter. I posted this in the Hunter/Jumper discussion because that's what I ride, but I am looking into some eventing stables for working student positions. Is there a difference in what trainers look for in those two disciplines?

                      Comment

                      • Original Poster

                        #12
                        Originally posted by SquishTheBunny View Post
                        I like the idea of showing you on different horses, but be very careful about your wording. The "unbroke" Appy is trotting and cantering.

                        I would cut the video down in time, and show short clips of riding different horses. Like others have said, pay attention to detail on picking the BEST clips. Good position, distance, track (straight) is more important that height. However, if this pro barn is hoping to have the working student show the 3' and 3'6 horses then you should find one where you can demonstrate a few jumps on.

                        Also, be clear on your abilities. I would much rather have an honest novice rider apply than a novice rider who says they can do more than they can. Work ethic, trainability and humbleness is often more important than being able to ride at "x" level already.
                        Thanks for your comments, and I really agree with that last paragraph you typed. Honestly, I don't know what level I am at. I know that I am well beyone cross rails, but I have never had the chance to compete on a nicer horse in the 2'6 or 3' divisions. Once I learned to jump and showed through the 18'' division on my own horse, I began riding lots of different horses and a few people have began to pay me to ride/show their green horses. So that's where I have been for the past 2 or 3 years. I really want to move up though. I don't know what to do, I feel like I'm stuck. I think I have the potential to expand and be better than I am now. But I do believe that I have improved a bunch from just riding these young, inexperienced horses. I have learned a lot about how horses think and how to get what you want from them in a civil way. It's been a good experience, but I am ready to move up.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Im not a pro and am probably about your age but here goes nothing. A minute in I got a head ache from the unsteadiness of the video. The big things I saw when you were showing was that your lines weren't straight and you didn't nail your distances, those are two big things with greenies! Then when you were schooling at home you were in a tee shirt and a dressage or all purpose saddle, I would wear a polo tucked in and ride in a close contact saddle. You were coming off more eventer-y than hunter rider. I am assuming you are applying for a H/J position? Also while schooling the back ground in the indoor was really distracting, I understand having shavings and hay stored in the corners but the chairs and four wheel were not only a distraction but a safety hazard. Like others have said 10 minutes is way to long!!!! I only skimmed through it so I probably missed stuff and plus I'm not a pro!! But if I was a pro and I had 20 other applications on my desk I wouldn't even watch the entire video if the first thing I saw was a typo and then a green horse cantering over cross rails. I'm not saying this meanly, I just know sometimes it's hard to interpret what someone means from a paragraph. Oh and quality over quantity !!!
                          Princess: evil first pony, Patch: RIP my baby girl, Lucky:I miss you, Molly:be good for your new kid, Charisma: my current project

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Can you find a local lesson barn where you can take a few lessons on a horse that can jump higher and get some video? I would definately take out any video with you in a t-shirt. You do ride well and have very soft hands. I would market yourself as someone with a lot of experience with young horses who is willing and motivated to move up.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Okay, here are the things I am seeing:

                              1. Better fitting coat, saddle pad and boots. People will try to fool you and say that the clothes you wear do not matter if you're a good rider, but in reality, you need to do whatever you can to make you look as professional as possible. That may also mean upgrading helmets as velvet isn't a common site in North America. At the very least fix the strap dangling. And polish your boots until you can see your face.
                              2. Shorten your video. Nobody wants to watch over 9 minutes of somebody jumping 18".
                              3. Jump bigger. If you can do it, you better prove it.
                              4. Put your toes in!
                              5. Get straight to your jumps, jump them in the middle, then land straight. This is important.
                              6. Try to get video that isn't shaky.
                              7. If you're going to sit the canter make sure that there is no 'air time' or time where your bum is out of the saddle. Go with the motion.
                              8. Practice no stirrup work. It forces you to ride well or you fall off. No pain no gain!
                              9. No T-shirts. Only clean, well fitting polo shirts.

                              You definitely have the potential to be a lovely rider with the right influences and I hope you are able to achieve your goal. All the best.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I think you have potential as a successful working student, but I don't think this video is going to help you much.
                                I agree with what the others have said, especially with the length of the video. I watched the first round, then skimmed through the remainder of it. Clear video is a very good asset, and the flat clips (I believe schooling at home?) are a little too dizzy.
                                Additionally, your clips weren't well organized (two jumping rounds, some schooling at home, more show clips, etc - jumped around a bit too much). I think a good way to utilize your time would be:
                                -Opening slide with 2-3 pictures of you jumping 2'-3', name, contact info, etc. For me the 18' course right off the bat didn't show your best capabilities.
                                -1-2 minutes of flatwork, starting with WTC of the flat-only greenies and then some sitting trot, lateral work, counter canter, or anything else of that type (that you can do well) on the horse you did the first two courses on.
                                -1-1.5 minutes of pole work, crossrails, or other training work with the younger, greener horses.
                                -2-3 minutes of 2'+ (if possible) coursework with any horses. If you can, find a 3'+ horse, even if you have to pay for it. Doing a 3' course well shows a lot more potential than a 2' course.

                                And some other ideas to help you:
                                -When filming, wear a solid polo, tucked in with belt. It appears you might have 2 helmets, one for show and one for schooling, as well as tall boots and half chaps? If I am correct, use the half chaps and nicer helmet - the tall boots look a little short, at least in the first few clips.
                                -If you are jumping lower courses, make sure they really show off your skills as a rider. The drifting, unstraight lines as well as the occasional "iffy" distance do not prove that you are a capable rider. Make sure you are straight and accurate.
                                -I think the indoor ring is a bit too small and dark for filming without the dizzying effect. If at all possible, film your clips outside (but make sure to zoom in).
                                -The long pause introducing each new horse adds time. To cut down on that, start the clip but have a subtitle at the bottom while the video plays describing the horse.
                                -If you can, borrow someone else's camera that has better video capabilities. A clearer video is a lot easier to see.

                                Best of luck!

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  I agree with all comments above but going to add if you are wanting to switch to an eventing barn truthfully I don't know of any around me that would put you on as a working student withOut experience in eventing ESP cross country. Cross country is dangerous in itself and truthfully they all would maybe let you ride some old schoolies but they are not going to want you working on training in of the horses. Reason for one you probably have no real experience in dressage. Dressage is the key to eventing. You work off your dressage score so you need to put in the best test possible and unless you have been riding dressage and understand the mechanics of it they are not going to want you trying to train it. Also as I mentioned cross country is about distances and also being straight to a jump. In the video you missed a few and were off to the side a lot. Stadium rounds you could probably handle ok but like i said the other two days are very important. I think you'd have a better chance at a hunter barn for a position then eventing. If your wanting to move to eventing you need to start lessons at a barn for a good while and learn more about it. I think you are a good little rider in hunters but 18" in not showing us much except you are pretty good with greenies. You need higher fences and see how it all stays together. If it's been a few years, like I believe you are saying, since you've jumped over 18" then you are proabaly going to be rusty at the higher jumps.
                                  Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole

                                  Comment

                                  • Original Poster

                                    #18
                                    Thanks for the help! My barn is not the fancy, neat kind, as you can see. We're rough and ready- that is how I have been brought up. No polo shirts, fancy tack (or horses), exc. Maybe I should have posted this thread in the Eventing Fourms instead. That is something I am very interested in, although I have no experience with it. I know I have barely any experience and am not that good, but I WANT to be. You comments are helping, and I will fix up the video and get some better shots before I send it out. Should I still post this in the Eventing Fourm too?

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      I grew up in what was basically a jumbo sized backyard barn. We weren't fancy and unfortunately my ex-trainer was the type that liked to make us all think we were better than the folks who had money/were "fancy". Do not get into this mindset. People will understand that you're tough, low maintainence girl, etc. once they meet you. You need to show that you know how to present yourself well and act professionally. You don't need a $3,000 saddle to show that you can ride and produce a good turnout for yourself and a horse. Don't say "Well I don't have that stuff so I can't produce a higher quality advertisement for myself. People will just see how good I am regardless." It doesn't work like that... atleast with the high end barns. Make some connections and find some people with capable horses and get some footage of yourself jumping 3'+ in nicer attire.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        You need to expand your horizons. Go to larger shows and see how people dress and present themselves. Copy what they do. You have to dress the part if you want to be taken seriously. As in the real working world, you dress for the job you want, not the job you have. You can find killer deals on show clothes and boots if you know what you are looking for. I became the queen of Ebay and consignment stores to find quality show clothes for my daughter at a great price. Your need to invest in a quality saddle that fits you well. If you do get a working student job, you will take your saddle with you, so you want a good one. There are good deals on high quality used saddles. Remember you are making an investment in your future. You need to take lessons at a barn that will let you learn and ride at a higher level. You must prove to a trainer that you are competent at higher fences, and your videos do not show this. Are your parents on board with you pursuing a working student opportunity? It is going to cost them more for you to get the experience you need in order to be considered for a position.

                                        Comment

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