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Critique My Riding

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  • Original Poster

    Originally posted by ActNatural View Post
    Very quick post here but wanted to say that I can relate.

    First, i think there is a gap between your experience and what you want and that gap needs to be filled with lots and lots of real lessons on schoolies that can jump so that you become the rider you want to be. You have been riding the greenies too long now so time to focus on yourself instead. The green horse experience will be so helpful down the line but you need to be fined turned. Even if you dont want to be an EQ rider, you need someone to polish you up!

    Second, dont put off college for this. Pick a school with a great IHSA program or in a location with quality barns in the area where you have the opportunity to advance. Maybe you can clean stalls and feed in exchange for lessons at a nice barn. Then, when you graduate and are a better rider and have an education, you can look for working student opportunites then. They will still be around. Your education is more important. Trust me. Been in your shoes before and I really didnt want to hear it but its true
    Thank you. The "college before w.s" quote has been said to me so many times now that I think I'm finally starting to get it, lol. My (tentative) plan is to pick a school in an area where there are lots of good barns and try and be a part time working student and go to college part time. Something along those lines.

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      Originally posted by ActNatural View Post
      Very quick post here but wanted to say that I can relate.

      First, i think there is a gap between your experience and what you want and that gap needs to be filled with lots and lots of real lessons on schoolies that can jump so that you become the rider you want to be. You have been riding the greenies too long now so time to focus on yourself instead. The green horse experience will be so helpful down the line but you need to be fined turned. Even if you dont want to be an EQ rider, you need someone to polish you up!
      Also, I really agree with what you said here. I have had a lot of realizations from posting this video of myself, and I'm SO glad I did because I was sort of in that mindset of "Well, since I ride all the problem horses and greenies, then I MUST be good and someone will take me on." I see now that I do need some fine-tuning of my skills. I have a good foundation and learned a TON about horses and their minds, but you're right- it's time to focus on me and my skills now. I already have a few barns where I am going to go as a working student this summer (just a few days a week) on top of the barn I am at now. Thanks for your help!

      Comment


      • OP, another great source for learning is the USEF network (just google it and the website will come up). They have the George Morris horsemanship sessions, which I have been watching religiously since my trainer is in Wellington for three months and only comes in town once a month. I also spend a lot of time on these boards looking at not just the hunter/jumper threads but also the eventing and dressage threads. I started riding again after riding as a child/young adult when I was 24 and in grad school. Even though I was not an experienced rider, I was a hard worker and was able to find opportunties to ride. I spent a lot of time watching others ride under a great trainer I had at the time. He even did course design so I would help him with that when I had the opportunity. To this day I love to go to the AA shows like Upperville and Capital Challenge to watch the great trainers schooling their clients. You really can learn alot. I also have several books that are my go-to when I am working on my own and I have a problem-Lessons with Lendon, Cross-training your Horse (Jane Sevoie), and Hunter Seat Equitation (George Morris). I spend a lot of time doing lower level dressage with my horse and try to take dressage lessons when I can, the better your flatwork the easier the jumping will be and you'll know how to deal with them pulling, leaning on you, rushing, etc. I wish you the best of luck, please let us know what you end up doing this summer!

        Comment


        • If I were discussing a position with you, I would completely disregard that video. 9+ minutes is too much. I saw what I needed to know in the first 30 seconds.

          The qualities which are important to me are as follows.....

          1) You can take direction.
          2) You are cheerful when you show up to work.
          3) You don't over use your cell phone when you're here.
          4) You sincerely like horses and treat them kindly.
          5) You are willing to work long hard days.
          6) You are physically fit.

          The riding issues can be addressed, you obviously know how to ride a horse but need more training to bring yourself along to the next level, as I'm sure you're aware.

          Since we're a small operation of just 8 to 9 horses the most important thing is your attitude, willingness to do what I ask, and a willingness to travel, ride, and do grunt work. I'm pretty sure this holds true for most trainers looking for a working student.
          Stoneybrook Farm Afton TN

          Comment


          • Go get 'em girl!

            Comment

            • Original Poster

              Originally posted by serendipityhunter View Post
              OP, another great source for learning is the USEF network (just google it and the website will come up). They have the George Morris horsemanship sessions, which I have been watching religiously since my trainer is in Wellington for three months and only comes in town once a month. I also spend a lot of time on these boards looking at not just the hunter/jumper threads but also the eventing and dressage threads. I started riding again after riding as a child/young adult when I was 24 and in grad school. Even though I was not an experienced rider, I was a hard worker and was able to find opportunties to ride. I spent a lot of time watching others ride under a great trainer I had at the time. He even did course design so I would help him with that when I had the opportunity. To this day I love to go to the AA shows like Upperville and Capital Challenge to watch the great trainers schooling their clients. You really can learn alot. I also have several books that are my go-to when I am working on my own and I have a problem-Lessons with Lendon, Cross-training your Horse (Jane Sevoie), and Hunter Seat Equitation (George Morris). I spend a lot of time doing lower level dressage with my horse and try to take dressage lessons when I can, the better your flatwork the easier the jumping will be and you'll know how to deal with them pulling, leaning on you, rushing, etc. I wish you the best of luck, please let us know what you end up doing this summer!
              Yes, I actually am a non-competing member of USEf and take part in their High School Equestrian Athlete program. I have never read or watched videos on the site though, I will have to check that out. Thanks so much for the support and advice, I will keep everyone updated!

              Comment


              • Horserider15, I think your problem is your current barn. You've simply outgrown the lesson program there. As you mentioned, it's a bit rough and tough. That's fine to start, but you eventually need to be able to ride a variety of school horses. And, frankly, if the comments here are not similar to what you're hearing from your trainer, then it's time to move on.

                You don't need to go to a fancy show barn. You don't need a great WB or a fancy French saddle. But you DO need quality instruction, with lesson horses and lessons that are managed professionally.

                You're ready for a good instructor who will work on your equitation, jumping/distances, and help you move up the levels. You just are not getting that level of instruction where you are.

                I agree with posters who suggested dressing for the job you want. You don't need TS breeches, but you do need clean breeches, a nice polo, etc. And a horse that is SHINING from top-notch grooming!

                Anybody looking for a WS will want somebody who takes fabulous care of the horses (as demonstrated by a gleaming, well turned-out horse), somebody who is hard-working (again, grooming), presentable (your clothes and general look), and somebody who is willing to take criticism and learn!!

                Good luck! (And do keep your health insurance coverage whatever else you do!)
                Born under a rock and owned by beasts!

                Comment

                • Original Poster

                  Originally posted by ako View Post
                  Horserider15, I think your problem is your current barn. You've simply outgrown the lesson program there. As you mentioned, it's a bit rough and tough. That's fine to start, but you eventually need to be able to ride a variety of school horses. And, frankly, if the comments here are not similar to what you're hearing from your trainer, then it's time to move on.

                  You don't need to go to a fancy show barn. You don't need a great WB or a fancy French saddle. But you DO need quality instruction, with lesson horses and lessons that are managed professionally.


                  Thanks, I agree. I am anxious to move on and take lessons at different barns.

                  Comment


                  • Here's my take, I'm currently a working student/assistant trainer at an A/AA hunter/jumper barn. Based off your video there is no way you are ready for this postion. I think you would be best suited to get a summer job, work hard and start paying for lessons at another barn with a good trainer that has the knowledge to teach you the basics. From what I saw you pretty much need to start from the ground. Prove to that trainer that you are willing and eager to learn. Start off by offering to groom for the trainer or lesson program on your days off. Do not expect anything to be given to you. I promise you I have worked my butt off to get where I am today. I started my first "working student" gig when I was 13. My parents would drop me off at the barn and I would spend the morning feeding grain then have my lesson and clean tack. After all the horse owning clients had their lesson the lesson program started. I groomed ponies cleaned tack and supervised the lesson kids. As I showed the trainers I was responsible and a skilled horseman then I started getting more rides. This sport and especially a ws position take time hard work and patients. I think you can develop the skills to become good enough for a ws position but it is going to take a couple of years of hard work. Above all else DO NOT put off college to get a ws position. Even if it's community college plan your classes to fit. I do night or online classes to make this work.
                    Spend so much time improving yourself that you have no time left to criticize others.

                    Comment


                    • The greenies are fun, but it's nice to learn on a lesson horse and work on yourself. =] You're welcome to come take lessons at our place! Jackson is currently available. He's an Appendix QH who has some spark but is wonderful.

                      Comment

                      • Original Poster

                        Originally posted by Kiera View Post
                        The greenies are fun, but it's nice to learn on a lesson horse and work on yourself. =] You're welcome to come take lessons at our place! Jackson is currently available. He's an Appendix QH who has some spark but is wonderful.
                        Yeah, and I think that is what I need to improve. I'm gonna try and come out with Tawny this summer! I have lots of plans but I'm going to try and make time for hunter/jumper as well as eventing. I am at the banquet right now! Lol

                        Comment


                        • Lol me too. The awards are so pretty!

                          Comment

                          • Original Poster

                            Originally posted by Credosporthorses View Post
                            Here's my take, I'm currently a working student/assistant trainer at an A/AA hunter/jumper barn. Based off your video there is no way you are ready for this postion. I think you would be best suited to get a summer job, work hard and start paying for lessons at another barn with a good trainer that has the knowledge to teach you the basics. From what I saw you pretty much need to start from the ground. Prove to that trainer that you are willing and eager to learn. Start off by offering to groom for the trainer or lesson program on your days off. Do not expect anything to be given to you. I promise you I have worked my butt off to get where I am today. I started my first "working student" gig when I was 13. My parents would drop me off at the barn and I would spend the morning feeding grain then have my lesson and clean tack. After all the horse owning clients had their lesson the lesson program started. I groomed ponies cleaned tack and supervised the lesson kids. As I showed the trainers I was responsible and a skilled horseman then I started getting more rides. This sport and especially a ws position take time hard work and patients. I think you can develop the skills to become good enough for a ws position but it is going to take a couple of years of hard work. Above all else DO NOT put off college to get a ws position. Even if it's community college plan your classes to fit. I do night or online classes to make this work.
                            Ok, thank you. I found a working position at a barn in my area for this summer! It is an eventing barn but I get free dressage and cross country lessons in exchange for my work, as well as lots of involvement in Pony Club. I still have to look into it but it is a possibility. I am also going to try and take some hunter/jumper lessons as well

                            Comment

                            • Original Poster

                              Originally posted by Kiera View Post
                              Lol me too. The awards are so pretty!
                              I know, I got 3rd so I was one away from getting a pretty award, lol! Where are you sitting?

                              Comment


                              • Wow, am I bad replier. I'm up at the front, second table from the door. Congratulations!
                                Last edited by Kiera; Mar. 9, 2013, 10:38 PM. Reason: yay for iPhones..

                                Comment

                                • Original Poster

                                  Originally posted by Kiera View Post
                                  Wow, am I bad replier. I'm up at the front, second table from the door. Congratulations!
                                  I saw you, congrats to you too! I had fun

                                  Comment

                                  • Original Poster

                                    Originally posted by Kiera View Post
                                    Wow, am I bad replier. I'm up at the front, second table from the door. Congratulations!
                                    I saw you, congrats to you too! I had fun

                                    Comment


                                    • That eventing barn sounds like a good fit for you and where you are now. You can learn better flatwork, learn to open up the stride and not pitty pat around. Best of all Pony Club can help with the wrapping, poulticing, first aid, bit science and selection and 100 other horsemanship details you lack at the moment. Also help with the contacts you are learning to develop.
                                      When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

                                      The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.

                                      Comment

                                      • Original Poster

                                        Originally posted by findeight View Post
                                        That eventing barn sounds like a good fit for you and where you are now. You can learn better flatwork, learn to open up the stride and not pitty pat around. Best of all Pony Club can help with the wrapping, poulticing, first aid, bit science and selection and 100 other horsemanship details you lack at the moment. Also help with the contacts you are learning to develop.
                                        Yay, I'm excited My parents and I just went up today to make sure we can find the place before we go to meet the owners and riders, and it was very nice. Nothing fancy or anything, but it seems like a good place for me to start.

                                        Comment


                                        • Originally posted by Horserider15 View Post
                                          Also, I really agree with what you said here. I have had a lot of realizations from posting this video of myself, and I'm SO glad I did because I was sort of in that mindset of "Well, since I ride all the problem horses and greenies, then I MUST be good and someone will take me on." I see now that I do need some fine-tuning of my skills. I have a good foundation and learned a TON about horses and their minds, but you're right- it's time to focus on me and my skills now. I already have a few barns where I am going to go as a working student this summer (just a few days a week) on top of the barn I am at now. Thanks for your help!
                                          Growing up, I was much like you and rode a LOT of green horses. While it taught me many things and I did a nice enough job with them, I will tell you that the very best thing I ever did for my riding was take lessons with the best coach I could afford on the nicest made horses possible.

                                          After several months of riding with excellent instruction on nicer horses, it improved my skill set greatly and I developed "feel".

                                          Now, I can ride a greenie and get it straighter and better balanced in a MUCH shorter time frame simply because I have had the education on how to do it correctly and what correct feels like. Because of that, I have developed a small-scale freelance business training and giving lessons at the local level. I'm not going to be the second coming of trainers, but it helps me to pay the bills for my own horse.

                                          I really cannot express how important I think this step will be for you in your journey. It will also open a lot of doors for you.

                                          I do not have a lot money, but I have had the opportunity to work with 2 excellent higher end trainers who were happy to take me on because of my work ethic and my humility and ability to take criticism. I have also found that it is extremely important it is to a trainer that you COMMIT to their program fully. If you're learning from someone in this type of situation, follow their every instruction to the T. You have asked for their help for a reason, put your faith into their program and you will see the results!

                                          Good luck!
                                          Proud Member of the "Tidy Rabbit Tinfoil Hat Wearers" clique and the "I'm in my 30's and Hope to be a Good Rider Someday" clique

                                          Comment

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