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OTQH to Jumper?

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  • OTQH to Jumper?

    Does anyone have an OTQH that they trained to jump? Any pros/cons or things to look for? I'm familiar with OTTB, of course, but I have no experience with OTQH.

    Thanks.
    “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”
    ¯ Oscar Wilde

  • #2
    I do! He's currently in the middle of his jumping training. They're a little trickier than an OTTB, purely because while most TBs can easily be trained to jump, QHs aren't always built for it and therefore have issues in the beginning. Other than that, it is very much the same as training an OTTB! Ideally, you want to look for an OTQH who either has some TB in him, is an appendix, or is built more like a TB and less like the traditional stocky QH type. Most OTQHs have some TB in them though, so finding one that will jump well isn't too challenging.

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    • #3
      My old A/O hunter was an OTQH. She was awesome. Much easier to train than an OTTB and every bit as talented. Most OTQH are a large percentage TB.

      Comment


      • #4
        At a sales barn where I rode, we had both OTTB and OTQH. I didn't do anything different in training them and wouldn't say there was a notable difference in the two types. The owner of that barn had years of expertise, used to ride with Chapot but broke her back in a fall, so moved to selling horses. She knew how to pick them, so I imagine her being the sole buyer had something to do with the similarities - she picked a good mind above all else, in both the QH and TB and any other breed she found. The only differences I noticed were in individuals, so I'm sure if you find a nice prospect OTQH, it'll be just as fun and rewarding as a good OTTB. I do find they hold their prices better, because of the breed show potential, I imagine.

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        • Original Poster

          #5
          Thanks, all. I have my eye on one, but just wasn't familiar with QH racing and the QH race horse.
          “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”
          ¯ Oscar Wilde

          Comment


          • #6
            I have an OTQH that I have done jumpers with. We are doing mostly dressage right now but he is very talented over fences.

            My guy is a pretty high percentage TB for what its worth. Amazing mind and very athletic.
            My blog:

            RAWR

            Comment


            • #7
              I had an OTQH that I sold to a top rider for a speed horse to show at big A shows. Although he was only 15.1 he won lots in top competition. He was a sweet horse, but he was STRONG and not fun to flat!!

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              • Original Poster

                #8
                Did most of you get the horses off the track, or did you buy them with some retraining already?
                “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”
                ¯ Oscar Wilde

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by ParadoxFarm View Post
                  Did most of you get the horses off the track, or did you buy them with some retraining already?
                  I met my guy the day he came off the track and worked with him briefly before he was given to a trainer (I didn't own him at the time). He and that trainer did not get along, so he was turned out to pasture and later given to me. So I did his initial training off the track (very initial...probably 3 months), then worked with him again after bad training/benign neglect.

                  My experience with him when he was right off the track was that he was incredibly sane, quiet and just needed lots of basics.

                  My experience with him after his less than wonderful training experience was that he is now more mentally sensitive but his willing personality and quiet demeanor never changed.

                  I am sure quite a lot depends on the horse. My trainer and I have both noticed that my guy has an exceptionally good brain in the sense of sanity and willingness(I am sure I am biased but my trainer's opinion is likely a realistic assesment). He is my first off the track horse and though he is quirky he has been very easy to work with overall.
                  My blog:

                  RAWR

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    My heart horse was an OTQH (well, mostly TB appendix)!

                    She was wonderful. Lovely uphill build and put together very well. I started riding her in the hunters and eq when I was in middle school. When I took her to college I dabbled in eventing, and she was a machine on XC.

                    As a hunter, she had a beautiful, round jump and bascule. I didn't start riding her until she was probably eight or so, so she didn't have any OT habits that I ever noticed. Well, except for a couple times. If we were riding out in the big pasture as we often did in August in Texas (we moved our jumps out of the dry, dusty, HARD arena and into the field), she could get a bit wound up. For fun one day, a friend on another OTQH and I decided we would "race" at the canter. Welp, that didn't go as planned. She got to boogying, and it took me quite awhile to stop her. We were moving so fast and the wind we created so strong, that my contacts folded up in my eyes and I couldn't see anything. There's a reason jockeys wear goggles!

                    Aside from that experience she was lovely! I had her until she was about 20 and loved every minute with her. She was also incredibly sound and had great feet. I think she threw maybe two shoes ever in all those years.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I would imagine that in areas where they have the pari mutual racing for the QHs, somebody is getting them thru the let down, evaluation for a second career then putting them out there.

                      My first 3 ft hunter, 24 at the time, was an appendix that had a tatoo confirming where he started. I used to know people who did this but lost track and that was 30 years or so ago-must be somebody still at it. Maybe try websites for Los Alamitos (that is still operating isn't it?) out in So Cal, Sunland Park in New Mexico The track websites might have links to second careers. Of course it's not specifically going to be aimed as a Jumper but conformation and movement are better predictors then papers anyway.

                      IIRC they did nothing different then you would with a TB but the horses were a little quicker and needed some re education about that blazing burst of speed. Heck, most of them have a ton of TB in there anyway, just on the sprint side not the distance.

                      If you look, watch your hip and shoulder angles, many have a way short step to get organized out of the gate and fly quicker, maybe look at 3 or 4+ furlong types that can stretch out a bit more. Oh, and they do yards, not furlongs, for distance in their races-440 yards is 1/4 mile or 2 furlongs- 880 would be 1/2 mile or 4 furlongs and some meets do race them at 880.
                      When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

                      The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I found that as long as the horse was let down off the track physically - food in the belly, any drugs out of the system - all the OT horses of whatever breed rode like stiff, green-broke horses with variations just coming from their individual temperaments. You will also want to make sure their hooves are in good shape, not racing plates on, and to check for ulcers, chiro issues, etc. If they are physically recovered from the track, training shouldn't be an issue.

                        In the sales barn, the only WBs/sport horses we got were cheap because of bad training somewhere, so they were way harder to ride than the OT horses! I found the track training was really not an issue to overcome; they are more like a blank slate than having training to undo - if they were handled fairly. They go forward, not all framed up/on the bit, so no one has ruined their mouths. They don't do alot of suppling, so yeah, they are stiff and green, but they are all pretty easy to get going long and low and work with from there.

                        Caveats would be abusive handling that could make them untrusting, and the one thing they are taught that differs from riding horses in general - pulling back on both reins and keeping pressure on them both means GO! So, don't do that Oh, and most do not understand that they should hold still while you get on - they are used to walking off as a jockey is swung up. So, just take the time to teach them that like you would a baby. I often didn't deal with it a lot - it doesn't bother me to get on as they walk forward - backward or sideways, no, forward, whatever. I know they need to learn it, but being a sales barn, I wanted to get on and wtc/jump as many as I could in a day, and didn't have a helper to hold, so I didn't want my training session to be all about the mounting process. It's not hard to do, just time I didn't often take in that environment.
                        Last edited by LilyandBaron; Jan. 9, 2013, 12:43 PM. Reason: wanted to mention ulcers/physical issues

                        Comment

                        • Original Poster

                          #13
                          Thanks, all. I have been enjoying reading everyone's posts. This horse I'm considering has been off the track for five months. He has had some reschooling (western) but owner thinks he would do better in another discipline. He is 16.2, so a good sized horse.
                          “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”
                          ¯ Oscar Wilde

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Owned one for 15 years...from the day he came off the track until he passed away. Lovely brain on that horse and scope to boot!! He did both jumpers and hunters as well as rode western...was a good all-around guy.

                            Mine was built like a TB. I would ride or buy another again!
                            Never Ride Faster Than Your Guardian Angel Can Fly
                            Way Back Texas~04/20/90-09/17/08
                            Green Alligator "Captain"

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by ParadoxFarm View Post
                              Does anyone have an OTQH that they trained to jump? Any pros/cons or things to look for? I'm familiar with OTTB, of course, but I have no experience with OTQH.

                              Thanks.

                              Living in Oklahoma I get quite a few of these......along with OT Paints and Appaloosas, since we run those here as well. They are track-trained somewhat differently than a TB, most don't get the long, daily gallops that a TB gets and can be a bit 'fresh' with a few days off. Once 'wound up' they come down a lot slower than a TB, just due to the training they get and the job they have to do (short, fast sprints).

                              That being said I've had a ton of success with them in all arenas and they do have 'more options' than a TB with regard to rehoming and finding buyers for them when trained.

                              You can check out your OT QH the same way you would your TB on the equibase.com site. Where the horse/jockey/owner/trainer toolbar comes up just type the name into the toolbar. You will get pedigree, race record, etc.

                              Make sure you get the registration papers with them.....breed shows, unlike USEF, requires original registration papers if you are planning on showing and doing those events. BTW, AQHA even has a dressage division now.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                So glad this post came up! I'm sort of looking at OTQH's after spending the past two years with an OTTB before selling. I have been interested in OTQH's because they actually run those down here in Texas! Glad to hear they aren't much different!
                                www.thetexasequestrian.com

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by gallupgirl View Post
                                  Living in Oklahoma I get quite a few of these......along with OT Paints and Appaloosas, since we run those here as well. They are track-trained somewhat differently than a TB, most don't get the long, daily gallops that a TB gets and can be a bit 'fresh' with a few days off. Once 'wound up' they come down a lot slower than a TB, just due to the training they get and the job they have to do (short, fast sprints).

                                  That being said I've had a ton of success with them in all arenas and they do have 'more options' than a TB with regard to rehoming and finding buyers for them when trained.

                                  You can check out your OT QH the same way you would your TB on the equibase.com site. Where the horse/jockey/owner/trainer toolbar comes up just type the name into the toolbar. You will get pedigree, race record, etc.

                                  Make sure you get the registration papers with them.....breed shows, unlike USEF, requires original registration papers if you are planning on showing and doing those events. BTW, AQHA even has a dressage division now.
                                  I just cracked up trying to imagine an Appaloosa race!

                                  (This based on my old Appy who was possible the slowest thing on 4 legs - I'm sure the racing Appys are different)

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    I look at a lot of race QH stud photos, and the majority are higher in the hip than the wither, so I would look carefully at that. Otherwise, you will probably get a much stronger rear end drive train than with the average OTTB.

                                    One of our QH Assn directors here in Colo acquired a very famous QH race gelding that ran for years on major tracks, but is now this guys trail and elk hunting horse.
                                    Comprehensive Equestrian Site Planning and Facility Design
                                    www.lynnlongplanninganddesign.com

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