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2 Questions: Indestructable rein recs, and USEF Jogging rules

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  • 2 Questions: Indestructable rein recs, and USEF Jogging rules

    I have an A/O horse who is impossible to jog at the horse shows. (Before anyone jumps on me and tells me to practice at home, and discipline him, etc, I do, but his demeanor on the ground is way different at shows than at home...i think this is his way of manifesting nerves)
    When jogging for ribbons, he spends the whole length of the ring trying to bite me or run me down, despite having a crop in his face. It is made so much better if i just give up and let him chew on my reins as we jog- problem is, he is ruining all of my expensive reins!
    So, my questions are:
    1.) Does anyone know of any sort of really hard to chew through reins? If I found some, i could have a bridle made up with them just for jogging, kind of like how he wears a different bridle to hack. They don't have to be super pretty, but i'd like them to be less obnoxious than rainbow reins.
    2.) My life would be infinitely easier (and safer) if I could just jog him in a flash. For some reason, I think this is not allowed, but after scowering the USEF rule book for the last hour, I can't seem to find anything that says that it would disqualify me.
    Thanks in advance, oh knowledgeable COTHers!

  • #2
    Have the horse jog beside you, not you in front of him. Train him with a whip (reach behind you with a whip in the left hand) and touch him on the barrel/quarters. Do it with a halter/chain shank (over bridle). If he runs/stop him, if he drags behind you (you at shoulder only) come with whip. PRACTICE it between the you and the wall. Stop/stand him up/march on again. Should only take a few days to change his mind.
    I.D.E.A. yoda

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #3
      Originally posted by ideayoda View Post
      Have the horse jog beside you, not you in front of him. Train him with a whip (reach behind you with a whip in the left hand) and touch him on the barrel/quarters. Do it with a halter/chain shank (over bridle). If he runs/stop him, if he drags behind you (you at shoulder only) come with whip. PRACTICE it between the you and the wall. Stop/stand him up/march on again. Should only take a few days to change his mind.
      Thanks, but as I said before, we have spent plenty of time practicing at home, where he is easy to handle. This is a show time behavior, which I can't exactly train him for while jogging for ribbons.
      Until the horse gets used to showing (he is new-ish to it) I'm looking for other alternatives. I will keep practicing at home.
      Anyone know the flash rule? or have any rein recs?

      Comment


      • #4
        I'm pretty sure that you have to jog in the same bridle you jumped in... Kind of a nitpicky rule, but a rule none the less.
        "Are you yawning? You don't ride well enough to yawn. I can yawn, because I ride better than you. Meredith Michael Beerbaum can yawn. But you? Not so much..."
        -George Morris

        Comment


        • #5
          I believe you have to jog in the same bridle you showed in, the same bit definitely but not sure about the rest of the bridle. I think you could definitely be eliminated for jogging in a flash since you can't show hunters in one.

          Comment


          • #6
            HU125.2 - you must return for the jog in the same bridle that you competed with or the judge can refuse you an award. No flash, no chain over the nose, a whip in front (though you said that doesn't seem to work) is fine, too. A professional can also jog your horse - not against USEF rules at all. I have seen a pro jog a stallion or bad mannered horse for their A/O before. Also, changing bridles for the Under Saddle is fine.

            Comment


            • #7
              Even if the rules don't specifically address it, it is understood you jog in a legal bridle, usually what you showed in. The unconventional is frowned upon, if it wasn't, you'd jog in a halter with a chain.

              I am one of many who cannot stand rude and disrespectful ground manners, partly because they are pretty easy to fix. Biting while being led is a bad habit and unacceptable, sooner or later he will leave a mark on somebody if he hasn't already.

              There is some really good stuff out there on ground manners, particularly over on the western side. YES it translates when practiced consistently by all who touch the horse. Does not take more then 10 or 15 additional minutes for a few sessions plus never tolerating him trying to hurt you or push you around anytime/anywhere.

              Sorry, you are going to have to practice or take your chances on getting hurt or really embarrased in that jog line if he bites you or the the rein and you lose him in front of everybody. Gal pal of mine lost the tip of her middle finger that way. Really.
              When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

              The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.

              Comment


              • #8
                Practice at a show that you are not showing at, if one is local. Find a local schooling show. We take the younger horses out to ride and school at shows they are not showing at. Before everyone starts saying it is a waste of time, I think it is all part of training. A well behaved horse should be able to perform the same at a show as at home (or better).

                Can you trailer him anywhere else off the property and practice? The time and $ you spend in gas could be less than a new pair of reins. And you'll get a more polite horse out of it.

                Miles makes manners. I can not stand a rude horse. =)
                Come to the dark side, we have cookies

                Comment

                • Original Poster

                  #9
                  Thanks Guys, I knew that sneaky rule was in there somewhere. Guess I'll resort to using cheapy reins from here on out...
                  I wonder if the rubber backed leather reins would work? They make some pretty ones of those, and they'd probably be harder to destroy.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Maybe just buy a cheap pair of reins (Bobby's) for your show bridle, until your young horse gets some show miles under his belt, maybe then he will be more manageable during the jog.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Don't use reins that have rubber on them either. A judge may not see that, but if some of them do, you could be eliminated, too. I have been called by certain judges to tell hunter exhibitors that they will not be pinned with those. Just my best advice as a Steward, which is what I'd tell you if I were at the show and saw what you described. Cheap leather reins, that the previous poster suggested, will be a good idea for now.

                      Comment

                      • Original Poster

                        #12
                        Thanks Everyone!!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          If you give him a mint before you jog in, will he still try to bite you? That's won't temporarily distract him and perhaps make him associate the jog with better things?

                          I'm sort of confused by how a horse got to the A/Os with so few miles that he's nervous in the jogs. But you do need to nip this in the bud before someone gets hurt. Jogging is part of his job.
                          ~Veronica
                          "The Son Dee Times" "Sustained" "Somerset" "Franklin Square"
                          http://photobucket.com/albums/y192/vxf111/

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            To expand on the mint idea... You could also try to put a piece of carrot in his mouth and then tighten his noseband for the jog. He will be busy sucking on the carrot and not trying to chew on you. This is probably not a valid long term solution but may work short term. Also- is he a good jogger otherwise? Ie does he stay with you or do you find yourself dragging him along/him dragging you along? If he's a good jogger could you slip the reins through a loose noseband? (Obviously you couldn't do both of my suggestions at the same time.). That way he can't get to the reins?

                            Suggestions on practice- I'm not sure where you show or the set ups they have, but any way you could practice at the shows? Like in the barn aisle? Or off in a quiet corner? For bad FEI joggers (stiff and/or naughty) you see them "practicing" all the time, any reason you can't do the same until he learns a little respect?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I agree with F8 and the others and would not allow this behavior to continue nor would I ever tolerate a horse chewing on my reins, expensive or otherwise. I can't stand a mouthy horse, and one that offered to bite would be having a CTJ meeting with me, even if I had to do it in the ring in front of God and everybody. For now, I would definitely slip a mint into his mouth before the jog and I would make sure that noseband was as snug as I could get it... then as others have suggested, I'd go to a bunch of shows where the goal was to work on the jog first and foremost. If you have to have a pro do it a few times to get the message across, so be it... but I'd urge you to nip this in the bud. That kind of thing only escalates.
                              **********
                              We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
                              -PaulaEdwina

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by pinkpony321 View Post
                                ...but his demeanor on the ground is way different at shows than at home...i think this is his way of manifesting nerves)
                                Try this line of thought. WHY is his demeanor on the ground different at shows then at home???? What's different? He is not "manifesting nerves", he is trying to hurt you and there is no reason to tolerate that.

                                Does he act the same when jogged in the bridle at home with others after jumping? Or is the show the only time he is ever asked to do that? If so, thats easy to correct.

                                Do you stand around and wait for a long time? Try taking him back to the stall even for a few minutes to pee and grab a bite then go back and jog.

                                Does he think he is done when he jogs and is in a race to get back to the stall-if you think that's it, saddle back up and ride for 10 minutes after the jog.

                                Or has he learned he is immune from punishment in the show ring? That can be fixed and should be fixed by disciplining regardless of who is watching. Not worth swapping a pair of reins or chunk of skin for a ribbon you won't even remember in a few years.
                                When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

                                The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  I don't generally have much use for an unconventional noseband, but this might be the one time to try a tack noseband, or a chain noseband, or a crank noseband. Just for the jog.

                                  Any of those, properly adjusted, might help break him of this bad habit.

                                  The idea of feeding him something (mint, carrot, peanut butter) right before you jog may work, but then you might create a new issue if he gets pushy about looking for treats.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by Lucassb View Post
                                    I agree with F8 and the others and would not allow this behavior to continue nor would I ever tolerate a horse chewing on my reins, expensive or otherwise. I can't stand a mouthy horse, and one that offered to bite would be having a CTJ meeting with me, even if I had to do it in the ring in front of God and everybody. For now, I would definitely slip a mint into his mouth before the jog and I would make sure that noseband was as snug as I could get it... then as others have suggested, I'd go to a bunch of shows where the goal was to work on the jog first and foremost. If you have to have a pro do it a few times to get the message across, so be it... but I'd urge you to nip this in the bud. That kind of thing only escalates.
                                    I agree with all of this except for the mint. I would have as many CTJ meetings in the show ring with this horse as are necessary to stop this behavior right now, even if I ended up giving up a lot of ribbons as a result.

                                    You also might try jogging him in the schooling ring at the shows to have your CTJ meetings there instead of the show ring if possible. Go to some schooling shows, etc. Whatever you have to do to stop this garbage, do it. And don't let him chew on your reins. This is not the kind of thing that will get better with "mileage" unless you do something to MAKE it get better. He won't just stop doing it on his own.

                                    My horse used to be this way even jogging at home (for the vet, etc.). We had CTJ meetings about it for about a month, and now we have refreshers on groundwork a few times a month and any time he decides it might be a wise idea to get mouthy or pushy on the ground. My horse will strike and charge his handler eventually if things are permitted to escalate. When I say we had CTJ meetings about ground manners, I mean we both ended up soaked in sweat and the horse was saying "Yes ma'am" with his head down and his face/body relaxed by the end of each session.

                                    To be honest, your horse will actually feel better if you address this and make it clear that his aggressive, dominating behavior is not permitted. It is stressful for them to not have a real leader. It is much less stressful for them to be put in their place. My horse is much, much, much more content if the rules are clear...which also means the rules can't change at shows.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      How about some no chew spray on the reins?

                                      nasty stuff..you don't want to get it on yourself... but maybe you could try it a couple of times to see if it would work.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        My friend has a junior that she feeds peanut butter just before the jog because it'll keep his mouth stuck shut for a minute. Even then she jogs in a chain noseband, generally they look the same as a normal noseband and the judge won't notice. Even so, better to train the horse and loose a ribbon, then let the horse run over you.
                                        Mendokuse

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