• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

I think I'm done

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • I think I'm done

    I think I’m done. I’ve ridden Hunters and Dressage for the better part of 40 years. Although I stopped showing a while ago, I’ve volunteered, judged and generally had horses in the industry for a long, long time. I’ve seen the changes, both good and bad, and truly the Hunter Derbies are the best thing I’ve seen in many years. The interest, the spectacular horses, and the improved riding. Although I’m a confirmed TB person, the current WB hunters are absolutely stunning – both in looks and ability. It’s poetry to watch them gallop and jump in the derbies.

    That said, I’m done. I’m completely changing disciplines. (No, I’m not going to say what I’m going to do – needless to say there will be enough whine and popcorn over this post by the time I’m finished without adding that to the firestorm).

    I still attend a lot of the shows. And frankly, I’m not at all sure I want to be associated with them anymore. For several reasons, one of which is cost. For many years the costs were on par with my salary. I’m a professional, and made a good salary. Now, the costs for shows (and horses) have so far outstripped my salary that I’m completely priced out. There is no way I could participate if I wanted to. Between stabling and associated costs charged by the show, and all the fees, it’s a minimum of $400 before entering a single class. Trainer Fees, splits, Ready Room/Tack Room charge, tips, staffing hotel arrangements, braiding and the like (not to mention paying board/training to keep your stall at home) have gotten ridiculous.

    Then don’t get me started on the classes. Now there are the usual Hunter Classes, Plus all the divisions in between , to the point that every three inch increment has a division complete with champion and reserve. And now they add Cross Poles. At an “A” show? Really? So now Mom and Dad can spend an obscene amount of money on a pony so DD can show at an “A” Rated show and bring home lots of pretty ribbons. Seriously?

    There is also the fact that by the time we separate out by age, fence height, and horse or pony, none of the divisions have more than 7 people entered. So basically, everybody gets a trophy. A trainer can bring 20 horses to a show, and yet nobody has too big of a division so that everybody can go home happy and feeling good about how much they’ve won.

    I was volunteering at a show and was helping organize the championship ribbons and coolers. There are so many now that the ribbons are printed with a generic title like ‘Children’s Hunter’ so it can be used for different age groups, or ‘low’ or ‘high’, and if it isn’t used this year, it can be used next year. The coolers only have the shows name, not the division. We have cheapened the sense of achievement of winning, even while upping the cost to an astonishing degree.

    Even the whole saddle question is irritating. Please tell me why everybody and their uncle has to have a custom saddle? Do we really have so much money than somebody who rides twice a week, and weekends at shows really needs a custom saddle? I know people who have never spent that much money on a horse, yet still manage to do just fine.

    The problem may not be the industry; that is a question of business models and who will pay the price. Nor the fact that we have shut out so many people who would like to participate because of the cost.

    Instead it may just be me and my perspective. I’m involved with a non-profit working overseas, and I’m getting quite an education about the world outside the US. As such, it’s a bit unreal to go to the shows and see the vast amounts of money are being spent by people who truly don’t believe that they are wealthy. And more power to them. It that’s what they want to do, then go for it. But whining about the fact that you can’t afford the latest hunt coat is truly a first-world problem, and in the scheme of things it’s is pretty unimportant.

    I do realize that this will open a can of worms, but this is truly just my opinion, and offered up for neither agreement nor disagreement, but more as food for thought, and a chance to get it off my chest. But I’m already feeling refreshed by my new riding discipline, and the new people I’m meeting and the wonderful horses I’m getting to know, and have yet to meet. I have no doubt that there are much the same issues involved, but because it’s new and fresh, I’m not yet jaded by it.

    And ultimately, this is about horses, their loving nature, and the fact that they are patient enough with us to jump over color sticks of wood if we ask, or prance on cue in a white rectangle just to please us. They will always nicker at us when we come in the barn, and practically purr when you scratch just that right spot regardless of the disicline that we ride.

    I’ll still watch the derbies with admiration and joy of a beautifully jumping horses, but I’m just not willing to be part of that world anymore. There are bigger things in life. I'm not willing to support it any more, and 'agree that it's the RIGHT discipline'. As I said, I'm done.
    The truth is always in the middle.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Thoroughbred1201 View Post
    But whining about the fact that you can’t afford the latest hunt coat is truly a first-world problem, and in the scheme of things it’s is pretty unimportant.
    Originally posted by Thoroughbred1201 View Post

    And ultimately, this is about horses, their loving nature, and the fact that they are patient enough with us to jump over color sticks of wood if we ask, or prance on cue in a white rectangle just to please us. They will always nicker at us when we come in the barn, and practically purr when you scratch just that right spot regardless of the disicline that we ride.
    .
    I don't have anything to contribute, other than the fact that I absolutely love these statements.
    Originally posted by rustbreeches
    [George Morris] doesn't always drink beer, but when he does, he prefers Dos Equis

    Comment


    • #3
      I've nothing to add, other than that I totally agree with you and think your post is awesome. Go out and enjoy your TBs (or whatever other horses you have or will have) in whatever way makes you happy.

      I briefly re-entered the h/j industrial machine a few years ago after kind of just dabbling on the edges for many years after my junior years were over. Had my horse in a big h/j "program" with a trainer that went to all the big shows, WEF, etc. (though, no, I did not go to WEF - I have a job, am not made of money, and can't get away that long even if I wanted to). It was an unpleasant experience for many reasons, and the one AA show I went to with that barn was an unmitigated disappointment on so many levels (and disaster, really, as my horse was badly injured within less than 12 hours of being on the grounds). I watched the trainer give Dex to every showing horse in the barn (How did I know? She annouced it!), and no, they did not all have allergies.

      So, now I have my little TB at an eventing barn, even though neither of us will probably ever event. I'm enjoying him more than I ever have before. Last night, we did a little bareback ride. It was a lot more fun, and a lot less expensive than taking him to shows where I won't have a good time.

      I hope you find happiness in whatever you end up doing!

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #4
        Originally posted by FineAlready View Post
        I've nothing to add, other than that I totally agree with you and think your post is awesome. Go out and enjoy your TBs (or whatever other horses you have or will have) in whatever way makes you happy.
        !
        Thanks so much. It sounds like you are having fun as well. I have to say, as the H/J world has deterioated, the Eventing riders are getting better and better. They have the most beautiful, effective positions in the air these days! I bet it's a fun place to be, even though you don't event.

        I'll always be around and involved with horses. I can't imagine not. What shape it will take? Well, who knows!
        The truth is always in the middle.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Thoroughbred1201 View Post
          I bet it's a fun place to be, even though you don't event.
          It is! The horsemanship is fabulous both in the saddle and on the ground. It's a good and knowledgable group, and they all really seem to put their horses first.

          Comment


          • #6
            I definitely enjoyed reading you post and agree with you. I grew up just learning to ride. We had someone give me lessons and take care of our horses in exchange for board and she taught me how to ride and our shows consisted of VERY local "fun shows" as they were called and I had a blast. As I grew up and onto college I was introduced to the h/j world and felt like an outside. I just wanted to have fun, I really didn't care what my horse looked like (brown spots or purple) or how he accomplished his job, I just wanted to enjoy my time and he be able to look forward to a ride versus getting barn sour, which I found many to do.

            Once I hit the real world I stayed in horses but was a bit bummed out. I have to say that I was actually lucky in finding a group of friends at college that did it for the pleasure and not for the shiny metal/trophy and we had our group and were separate from others.

            Today I no longer participate in the hunter ring....waaaaay to political for my taste and never knowing who the judge will pick today. I started the jumper ring where the timer judged who got the 1st place spot. I have loved it. I have again been lucky to find a great local, unrated, show to go to and LOVE it. I every once in a while have thought of going to the Hits, but its so expensive. $50 for just ONE class... that's like my whole division and then some at the local shows.

            I am a TB person as well and gotten heavily involved in TB only shows/classes and when I show that's what I do. I like to show off his breed and prove he can do anything...and we're just breaking into the eventing world..which I have found he enjoys...minus ditches...

            Good Luck to you in your new ventures and I hope you find the happiness and be content!
            Calm & Collected, 13, OTTB
            Forrest Gump (Catasauqua) , 17, OTTB
            Little Bit Indian, 29, TB
            Owner of Spur of the Moment, Custom made spur straps! Find us on Facebook

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by FineAlready View Post
              It is! The horsemanship is fabulous both in the saddle and on the ground. It's a good and knowledgable group, and they all really seem to put their horses first.
              I've found eventers to be some of the most knowledgable riders too- a lot of them seem more willing to work with "quirky" horses, and have amassed a lot of knowledge about how to work with different types of horses.
              Blog chronicling our new eventing adventures: Riding With Scissors

              Comment


              • #8
                It's 'rich people problems' for sure. I'm in what I call the 'use and enjoy' group. I have a horse solely for the purpose of using and enjoying him. I do feel that there is some kind of stigma on those people who choose to only jump their horse to say 2'3" (but your ruining his jump, he has the potential to do so much more, yadda yadda yadda).

                I hope whatever you are deciding to do with your horses that you get all the use and enjoyment out of them possible! Good luck on your new journey, wherever it takes you!

                Comment

                • Original Poster

                  #9
                  Originally posted by PaintedHunter View Post
                  I've found eventers to be some of the most knowledgable riders too- a lot of them seem more willing to work with "quirky" horses, and have amassed a lot of knowledge about how to work with different types of horses.
                  Nowdays, absolutely. I remember the days that Cross Country was the end-all, and just running at fences was acceptable. However, with all the safety concerns of the last years, the quality of riding has improved exponetially. I'm more and more impressed with the quality of riding by eventers. I also applaud their bravery because personally, I think they're nuts to do what they do. I'd be scared to death!!!
                  The truth is always in the middle.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I totally agree with you OP. I am so glad I am content to school at home, take the occasional lesson/clinic, and show infrequently. I know so many people that HAVE to show on the A circuit and their families make major sacrifices to make it happen.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      These are some of the reasons I switched to dressage, besides the fact that my horse wasn't a big winner in hunters. Didn't have that flat knee going for him. All is true to a degree. I've found with dressage as long as I stick to the schooling shows it's still fun and everyone is so nice. I will show usdf but the majority is schooling shows because of the people and the cost is soooo much less than hunter shows or usdf shows. The only thing I would say is I just received my first custom saddle, I've been riding over 15 years. Reason was for my horse and not me or to be cool. He needed it because of how he is built and he'd get very back sore.
                      Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole

                      Comment

                      • Original Poster

                        #12
                        Originally posted by HRF Second Chance View Post
                        I'm in what I call the 'use and enjoy' group. I have a horse solely for the purpose of using and enjoying him.
                        LOL, I love it. I've always been part of that group as well. and considering that I keep all my horses until they drop, I'd better enjoy them!
                        The truth is always in the middle.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thoroughbred1201, I agree fully with your post and personally, don't see how a can of worms could BE opened (even though someone will haha).

                          What you said was well thought and logical. It wasn't whiney to me, it was truth. It IS what it is becoming.

                          I showed more than I EVER have this summer because I went pro (on top of a cattle ranch and a couple real jobs) and had horses to show. Sure, it was fun not having to cover bills on a few of them, but wow did I learn to not really enjoy showing. My options in the jumper ring were pretty limited for my horse... I could do the 1.15m and the 1.20m ... done. And, only 3 days. I showed the others in hunters, where there were plenty of options... then had to find an ammy (awesome one by the way) to cover the weekend classes for me.

                          I dunno, I liked it, had my moments of joy and fun (all the horses did extremely well, so it's not like I was losing!), but the checks I had to write, wow. Divisions didn't fill, one day's class was HUGE but empty the other 2 days, etc. It just wasn't something that allowed my boat to float.

                          As a good friend put it... there are show riders and there are training riders. I found I had way more fun restarting off track TBs and putting time on other people's horses, rather than showing (which I'll do occasionally cuz I can't help myself but am not in love with being at shows constantly like some people quite enjoy)
                          Kelli
                          Horse Drawings!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by PaintedHunter View Post
                            I've found eventers to be some of the most knowledgable riders too- a lot of them seem more willing to work with "quirky" horses, and have amassed a lot of knowledge about how to work with different types of horses.
                            I could not agree more. My horse freaking loves his training rides from the eventing trainer.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by FineAlready View Post
                              I could not agree more. My horse freaking loves his training rides from the eventing trainer.
                              I gave my really quirky, hard-to-ride gelding to an eventing trainer, and he is going around so happily for her. She knows just what buttons to push and which ones not to. No one has ever been able to ride him like she does.
                              Blog chronicling our new eventing adventures: Riding With Scissors

                              Comment

                              • Original Poster

                                #16
                                Originally posted by PaintedHunter View Post
                                I gave my really quirky, hard-to-ride gelding to an eventing trainer, and he is going around so happily for her. She knows just what buttons to push and which ones not to. No one has ever been able to ride him like she does.
                                My fancy TB Hunter was as quirky as they come. My trainer used to laugh that if I ever leased him out, we'd have to send his large rule book with him. He wasn't easy, but he taught me to ride and to think like a horse. My trainer put a lot of time into him (as did I) and we did very well, but it certainly was a ton more work that most people are willing to do today. But it's the quirky ones that often the best show horses once you find their key. Event trainers really are will to unlock that whereas few H/J trainers seem to be willing to take the time anymore.
                                The truth is always in the middle.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by PaintedHunter View Post
                                  I gave my really quirky, hard-to-ride gelding to an eventing trainer, and he is going around so happily for her. She knows just what buttons to push and which ones not to. No one has ever been able to ride him like she does.
                                  The "not to" part is trickier, lol! I am sometimes surprised to find out that my horse has more "eject" buttons that you might suspect, just looking at him.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    I don't know how this could open a can of worms. I couldn't agree with you more. I have finally accepted the fact that my trainer and barn, though 50 minutes away, is exactly what I want. She puts the horses first, doesn't drug and makes sure that we all know what we are doing. It's imperative that we know about our horse's health and care. She has helped me bring along a few young ones and I can't wait for mine to be old enough to start. We are lucky because we have a very competitive local circuit and are surrounded by great rated shows. A lot of the big trainers in the area school at our local circuit shows so it's pretty competitive. If I really want to go to an A show I can and have a trainer that is more than willing to take me. I love that my horse is turned out for 8-12 hours a day. I am so happy she isn't drugged. I am lucky to have a trainer that I trust implicity with her care. I couldn't ask for anything better. I hate the direction the discipline has gone in. When I was a kid getting to go to a big rated show was a huge deal. It meant you had learned to ride well enough to go and compete without embarassing yourself or killing yourself in the ring. I wish more people these days just enjoyed their horses instead of just showing.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by Jack16 View Post
                                      When I was a kid getting to go to a big rated show was a huge deal. It meant you had learned to ride well enough to go and compete without embarassing yourself or killing yourself in the ring.
                                      SO TRUE! I forgot about this. I didn't do my first A rated show til 2008 when I was about 26 years old (on horses I started off track myself) and I've formally ridden h/j since I was 6... and my husband and I budgeted all year for that one week. It was SO COOL! I'd finally "made it". I felt so in awe to be there...

                                      As a kid, I was allowed to go along to a rated show and just help groom. I thought that was the coolest ever. And, the young kids who were showing were amazing riders. I was so impressed.

                                      Now, sad to say, anyone who can afford it, goes. In MY world, I have pride in being the best, so if my horse or I are not ready, we don't make a public appearance just to say we went. *but let me say, there still ARE the best riders at the rated shows, just lots more "not best" riders around than I remember.
                                      Kelli
                                      Horse Drawings!

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        I am afraid that the big money influence is creeping into eventing...

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X