• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Blog on crest vs. auto release

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Blog on crest vs. auto release

    Ran into this interesting blog, seems there are several points of merit. The photos are interesting as well.

    Never been a fan of the lay up the neck jumping, the author states that the crest release is born of laziness in not developing proper balance, allowing riders to advance in height without a proper foundation.

    Counterpoints?

    http://glenshee.blogspot.com/2009/01...as-ruined.html

  • #2

    It must be true. I read it on the internet.
    www.OneJumpAhead.ca

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #3
      Originally posted by Ravencrest_Camp View Post
      It must be true. I read it on the internet.
      If you disagree (or agree), I am interested in the how/why.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Misanthrope View Post
        If you disagree (or agree), I am interested in the how/why.
        Spend -- literally -- 30 seconds searching the forum and you'd find enough to keep you buys reading for a week.

        Then get back to us.

        Comment


        • #5
          While I didn't admittedly read that whole blog post, I skimmed it and found that it took a bit of a harsh perspective on the crest release. In every picture that they used to portray a crest release, they also used a rider with poor lower leg position and a very low upper body but (in my opinion, incorrectly) attributed all of the error in the photo to the rider's hand position.

          I think a well-done crest release is a much better option than a poorly done auto-release. Here are some pictures of GOOD crest releases that the author of that blog might want to consider:

          http://ridemagazine.com/sites/defaul...nd_saphire.jpg

          http://www.floridahorse.com/2008Jax/...MWard11808.jpg

          http://www1.pictures.gi.zimbio.com/O...rYITE-cDIl.jpg

          http://cdn.newsday.com/polopoly_fs/1..._600/image.jpg

          i mean it can't be too horrible if those people are all using it...can it?

          just my .02.

          Comment


          • #6
            Is this your blog? Why not just say so?
            http://weanieeventer.blogspot.com/

            Comment


            • #7
              I personally dislike most "extreme" views on anything to do with riding, such as those in the blog post OP linked to.

              Why?

              Because I think that different methods and styles of riding are all tools. Just like a good toolbox has more than one kind of screwdriver, I think riders need to have more than one way of riding in their "toolbox." (that applies for more than just releases, but I'll stick with releases) I know how to properly execute the basic releases (long, short, automatic, crest) and utilize them all regularly. I would never eliminate one from my toolbox because I felt like one would do a better job 100% of the time than having four options to go to.

              The properly done crest release has its place as does the properly automatic.

              As I said, that's just my opinion. Off my soapbox now.
              Trying a life outside of FEI tents and hotel rooms.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by enjoytheride View Post
                Is this your blog? Why not just say so?
                Because if you have to post your own blogs on a forum, people might not realize it contains fresh new never-before-seen insight. It's much better if a stranger posts it and implies the same.

                Oh wait...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by LochNessD View Post
                  Because if you have to post your own blogs on a forum, people might not realize it contains fresh new never-before-seen insight. It's much better if a stranger posts it and implies the same.

                  Oh wait...
                  LOL!
                  Unrepentant carb eater

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'm with GingerJumper. That's pretty normal, though

                    I think different releases have their places. I happen to use the crest release far more often than the automatic release for a variety of reasons, but it's my personal preference (and my horse's preference!).
                    http://www.youtube.com/user/supershorty628
                    Proudly blogging for The Chronicle of the Horse!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Considering this blog post appears to be from several years ago, I'd guess it's probably not the OP's. If it was someone looking to drive traffic, there are much newer posts they could have linked to.
                      Blog chronicling our new eventing adventures: Riding With Scissors

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I learned to ride in the 70s and came back to riding after I had my kids. I discovered this blog some time ago and bookmarked it because I liked it. It helped me figure out what was bothering me about the riders I was watching at the local shows. I do think riders who use the current style can be very skillful, but I think they are at a disadvantage because their stirrups are too long and they tend to "stand" in their stirrups and drape themselves forward. The crest release is just one of the characteristics of this style of riding.

                        Originally posted by goodlife View Post
                        While I didn't admittedly read that whole blog post, I skimmed it and found that it took a bit of a harsh perspective on the crest release. In every picture that they used to portray a crest release, they also used a rider with poor lower leg position and a very low upper body but (in my opinion, incorrectly) attributed all of the error in the photo to the rider's hand position.

                        Not true. You are correct that the riders show poor position, but the blog author does not blame this on their release alone. She mentions specifically that the modern riders in the pictures she uses all ride with too-long stirrups, pivot off the knee, and drape themselves on the horse's neck in order to get their weight out of the saddle.

                        I think a well-done crest release is a much better option than a poorly done auto-release. Here are some pictures of GOOD crest releases that the author of that blog might want to consider:

                        http://ridemagazine.com/sites/defaul...nd_saphire.jpg

                        http://www.floridahorse.com/2008Jax/...MWard11808.jpg

                        http://www1.pictures.gi.zimbio.com/O...rYITE-cDIl.jpg

                        http://cdn.newsday.com/polopoly_fs/1..._600/image.jpg

                        True--the pictures you use are all characteristic of excellent riding. However, note that these are all highly-skilled jumper riders, none of whom is riding with too-long stirrups. The blog author specifically mentions hunter and equitation riders as most likely to be guilty of the faults she mentions. I can't believe she would have any issue with Beezie Madden.

                        i mean it can't be too horrible if those people are all using it...can it?

                        just my .02.
                        I agree that the blog author is a bit harsh against the crest release, and I don't want to incite a flame war. But she makes some valid points, and the pictures of Kathy Kusner are sublime.
                        I heard a neigh. Oh, such a brisk and melodious neigh as that was! My very heart leaped with delight at the sound. --Nathaniel Hawthorne

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by supershorty628 View Post
                          I'm with GingerJumper. That's pretty normal, though

                          I think different releases have their places. I happen to use the crest release far more often than the automatic release for a variety of reasons, but it's my personal preference (and my horse's preference!).
                          Great minds and all that

                          Horse preference is also super important, which you mentioned. Not all horses like an auto release, no matter how perfectly executed it is! Different horses like different things, no way around it. There is no one size fits all in ANYTHING when it comes to horses.
                          Trying a life outside of FEI tents and hotel rooms.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I thought it was interesting that the author of the blog didn't post any pictures of herself doing an automatic release... if it's so awsome you'd think she'd want to show how much better she rides now that she's using it... also the picture of the novice rider using one is just scarey, since that horse looks like it is about to flip over.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I think this was a well written article explaining (with excellent photos) exactly what a crest vs automatic release really is. Having just come back into the hunter world after 35 years and and having never been taught this "new" type of riding I simply could not master this touching the neck thing when I started back over fences. Never, NEVER was I ever permitted to do such a thing when I was riding back then. It was considered a mortal sin to touch your horses neck anywhere over a jump. If you did not have enough balance to ride without doing so you simply did not jump until you did.

                              When my current and well known trainer told me in no uncertain terms that I simply could not show in the hunter ring without using this crest release thing I thought to myself how sad is it that a beginner technique over fences has become the norm and those of us that still perfer to use the more shall I say advanced? method would be penalized in the show ring. Well I simply could not force myself to do it, my trainer threw a hissy fit because I refused to relearn to do it the "proper" way and we have since parted ways. I will continue to do it the old fashioned way and will have to wait to hear what the new hunter judges will think.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                There is a huge difference, though, between attempting to do any sort of release with stirrups that are too long and doing a proper one with stirrups at the appropriate length. All of the pictures in that blog show a crest release with excessively long stirrups.

                                I don't like to use other people's pictures without their permission, so I'm using a few of mine. I don't use the automatic release on my horse, nor do I think it's the second coming of sliced bread that a lot of people think it is. It's a tool and it has its place, just like anything else in riding, but the high and mighty attitude that some people get about it is, frankly, kind of strange.

                                Stirrups properly adjusted, decent sized fence, crest release: https://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphot...90547378_n.jpg

                                Again (not as good of an angle, sorry): https://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphot...7_372866_n.jpg

                                And I can do an auto release (https://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphot...917_4029_n.jpg) but I choose not to.

                                There is nothing about a properly done crest release that makes you unbalanced or too far out of the saddle. With that being said, I'm not sure that the hunter ring is the best place to look for pictures of classic equitation, regardless of release.
                                http://www.youtube.com/user/supershorty628
                                Proudly blogging for The Chronicle of the Horse!

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  I never ceases to amaze me how much mental energy some people waste by getting upset about things other people do that has absolutely no bearing or effect on them personally.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    That was a really weird perspective, that crest releases allow bad riders to become top level competitors (the whole cheating theme--odd . . . ), or that they completely derail your balance. IMO it is reversed--if you lose your leg you fall on the horse's neck. But there is no reason why a properly executed release would make you lose your lower body.

                                    I event, which may teach things a little differently, but in general there the release has to do with the fence/combination, the terrain, how your horse is going (too bold, going to be long/short), what you need for the next fence.

                                    But defining the ride by the hand position seems awfully myopic.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Both releases can lead to awful habits when not taught from the grass root up.

                                      We have a trainer in this area infamous for telling her beginner to mid-level riders "THROW YOUR HANDS TO HIS EARS". (we all have one) If it was one rider who tends to smack the horse in the mouth o/f, I could understand. But it is literally each and every one. Then what you get is the lovely hurled-upper-body and snatch back affect. It's an atrocity...

                                      I feel a big fault with the crest release is limited adjustment over the fence. In the lower level hunters, this may not be such a necessity. While progressing to high caliber hunter classes, jumpers or XC style riding o/f, it' a vital skill needed. And if you're an older rider, we all know how difficult it is adjusting our bodies to a new skill. I think this is how the crest release is viewed as a crutch, limiting a riders' ability to advance in their jumping.
                                      "Truth is incontrovertible, malice may attack it and ignorance may deride it, but, in the end, there it is." Sir Winston Churchhill

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by AmmyByNature View Post
                                        I never ceases to amaze me how much mental energy some people waste by getting upset about things other people do that has absolutely no bearing or effect on them personally.
                                        Eh, we all do it. On this forum, for instance, I have been astonished more than once by how much energy people spend on the question of whether or not one should ride in a black saddle, a green jacket, a breast plate, or rust breeches. I belong to a baseball forum, too, and people absolutely agonize over team decisions they have no control over. Why do they do it when it "has absolutely no bearing or effect on them personally"? I'm not sure, but it sure is human nature.

                                        In this case, I think it's partly a matter of people who are older feeling that things have changed for the worse (which may or may not be true) and partly general concern for the state of the sport. I teach at a university, and we all worry constantly over the state of education, students today, administrative and state attitudes, etc.--many of which don't "affect us personally" but which cause us concern for the future.
                                        I heard a neigh. Oh, such a brisk and melodious neigh as that was! My very heart leaped with delight at the sound. --Nathaniel Hawthorne

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X