• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

When is enough enough?!?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #21
    When to say when?

    When you find yourself stark awake with the lights on at 1:30 in the morning, lying in bed staring at the ceiling trying unsuccessfully to meditate so you can force yourself tomorrow morning to get back on that sucker One More Time.

    I've had that dubious "pleasure" twice.

    As the raven said, "Nevermore!"

    Comment


    • #22
      Originally posted by moonriverfarm View Post
      It is sorta like any other relationship: you quit when it stops being fun. If you have to force it, time for a change.
      This

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #23
        Thanks for the thoughts.. I think I'm gonna continue to see If he improves with this trainer for another few months, and go from there. I would like him to be out all the time, I personally believe that a lot of the "spook masters" issues could be improved by 24/7 turnout. If we dont mesh well together im sure someone will. I will post some pics a little later!

        Comment


        • #24
          2nd time I am going to say this tonight. Have him checked for ulcers. I deal with a lot of ottb's and generally they are not spooky for me. Spooking like that could be ulcers. I ride mine outside all the time, in the wind and in the field by themselves. Some just a week off the track and some with more downtime. I don't usually have issues, but then again some horses are just spooky.

          If his spookiness is already making you uncomfortable, and you don't want to dump a ton of money into him to get to the bottom of his issue that might just be his temperment, then rehome him with someone who will be comfortable with what he is and who will be willing to have him checked and treated.
          Derby Lyn Farms Website

          Derby Lyn Farms on Facebook!

          Comment


          • #25
            +1 on checking for ulcers - this has turned my spook-ball into an angel. I also agree that the spooking could be compounded by your horse not listening/respecting you. I have had a ton of luck with the dully halter by Monty Roberts.

            I did have to give up on a "dream horse" and it was devastating. He was purchased with blood, sweat and tears and he was too much horse for me and had a few screws loose. After 3 years he turned into a pasture ordiment. It's a tough decision but a smart one considering the consequences of this sport.

            Comment

            • Original Poster

              #26
              The vet is booked for this week for him to get him UTD anyways. I will get him checked for ulcers and get a overall exam, hopefully well get some answers!

              Comment


              • #27
                I'm going through this exact thing at the moment. I've had my girl for a year(tomorrow actually) she came with her issues, so it wasn't something I didn't expect. But after a year of trying to work through them with a trainer who knows TBs inside out I'm starting to wonder when I should just cut my losses and move on. I purchased her as a hunter prospect and planned on showing her this summer, but that's not going to happen. It's so hard for me because she is so nice on the flat, but point her at a jump and she loses her mind. And all I keep thinking is maybe one day she will jump around like she flats. I'm beyond frustrated right now.

                Comment


                • #28
                  Thank you OP for this great thread. I also am in the same spot! I am making some program changes to see if that may help me make my final decision. I am not overly attached to this horse so in certain ways the decision will be easier but because he has some "quirks" in his closet finding him an appropriate owner may pose some challenges. Nice to know I am not the only one "on the fence" (pun intended).

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    This may not be the issue with your horse, but I have a mare that I pretty much decided was going to be a pasture ornament, since she was extremely spooky, just nutso about stuff. Nothing worked that I tried, training methods, or supplements. Someone mentioned to me about Magnesium, and I really didn't think it would work, because I have tried Mag Ox and Quiessence already with this mare, and got minimal results. But I started her on the loading dose of MagRestore about a week ago, and it is amazing the difference. Apparently she was deficient, and I now have a new horse, which is awesome, because I would love to ride her, but quit doing so before because she was just a mess. It costs $16 bucks for the trial size for 10 days of a loading dose. If your horse is not deficient, you won't see a difference, but with mine it has been amazing.

                    Comment


                    • #30
                      Not to hijack the thread, but I'm going through a similar situation and am trying to come to a decision. Last summer I was given a free lease on a beautiful TB gelding - nice mover, found out he has a super jump, and great personality. The only thing is, he's been sitting in the owner's field for the last 5 years because she quit riding.

                      I feel like I'm a fairly competent rider, especially with flatwork, and this isn't my first green horse. However, this guy is a challenge for me. No spook, no buck, great try-er, but he's just, well, difficult. It's been 10 months and I still don't feel comfortable that I've got enough control to canter around a ring. He's the type of horse that you need to manage every. Single. Step. I've recently gotten a dressage trainer to come out and do some training rides in the hope that I can improve the flatwork enough to move forward with jumping. He's always fantastic after she rides him (the good moments are GREAT) but last night she echoed something that I've been thinking...that he's never going to be an "easy" horse (I want to do hunters) and that he's going to need quite a bit of training to get to the point where I want him. Does she think he's got it in him? Yes. Do I think I've got the money to pay for the training that it'll take to get there? No. In my heart I know the answer, but I've really gotten attached to this guy. Should I stick it out a little longer or do you think enough is enough? I'm not one to quit something just because it's hard, but reading another post about ending rides in tears has gotten me thinking.

                      Comment


                      • #31
                        It is such a personal decision, but I think when you stop looking forward to going to the barn and riding...that is when something has to give. Horses are a huge financial and emotional expense, that somewhere- something should be fun. Even if it is just decompressing while watching your horse graze.

                        Every person has different goals and abilities, and if the horse doesn't fit than finding the right situation for the horse (and giving yourself a chance to have a horse that does fit those goals and abilities) is the best situation. Life is short...enjoy as many moments as you can
                        Certified Spiritual Medium/ Animal Communicator
                        www.heatherevebristol.com
                        www.meliorastables.net

                        Comment


                        • #32
                          OP also check his feed. My OTTB was spooky (spin and wheel type) when he was on regular grain. Switched him to senior. Spooking stopped and he got quiet. Also, have a chiro check him. My chiro says that horses can get headaches. When my horse is about due for a chiro adjustment, he starts to spook again. Nothing like the way he used to spook thought. He was unrideable on a spooky day before. Now, i can just ride him through it.

                          Just some thought from a fellow OTTb owner.. my guy DID race though. 16 times Nothing earth shattering

                          Comment


                          • #33
                            I went through this with the very first horse I ever bought on my own. She was 8 months old when I got her and I was one of those silly people who thought draft horse + paint horse = warmblood-esque horse

                            I broke her myself at 2 and she was always very quiet and easy, but she had pretty much zero potential in the show ring. Horrible mover, heavy on the forehand, deadhead... However, she was AMAZING on the trails and really a joy to ride in the woods. Since I realized she was never going to be the horse I wanted her to be, I decided to find her a home where she would be some trail rider's dream horse. It definitely worked out for both of us in the end.

                            Don't try to fit a square peg in a round hole.
                            Southern Cross Guest Ranch
                            An All Inclusive Guest Ranch Vacation - Georgia

                            Comment


                            • #34
                              Originally posted by Rickys Rider View Post
                              Not to hijack the thread, but I'm going through a similar situation and am trying to come to a decision. Last summer I was given a free lease on a beautiful TB gelding - nice mover, found out he has a super jump, and great personality. The only thing is, he's been sitting in the owner's field for the last 5 years because she quit riding.

                              I feel like I'm a fairly competent rider, especially with flatwork, and this isn't my first green horse. However, this guy is a challenge for me. No spook, no buck, great try-er, but he's just, well, difficult. It's been 10 months and I still don't feel comfortable that I've got enough control to canter around a ring. He's the type of horse that you need to manage every. Single. Step. I've recently gotten a dressage trainer to come out and do some training rides in the hope that I can improve the flatwork enough to move forward with jumping. He's always fantastic after she rides him (the good moments are GREAT) but last night she echoed something that I've been thinking...that he's never going to be an "easy" horse (I want to do hunters) and that he's going to need quite a bit of training to get to the point where I want him. Does she think he's got it in him? Yes. Do I think I've got the money to pay for the training that it'll take to get there? No. In my heart I know the answer, but I've really gotten attached to this guy. Should I stick it out a little longer or do you think enough is enough? I'm not one to quit something just because it's hard, but reading another post about ending rides in tears has gotten me thinking.
                              Is this a horse you're only leasing? If so, I wouldn't put the money into training, period.

                              But if it's one you could own... how much do you love him? As in, do you prefer learning to ride him and the challenge that takes to getting to show hunters? If you get him going well in dressage he should eventually be adjustable enough for you to do a hunter round, but you need to give up on any hunter goals. That's such a very, very personal decision.


                              For me, I want to show my guy dressage and it's a bit of a fight to get him going well. We have seen improvements in the two years I've had him, though. But more important to me is the learning I'm managing, and my improvement as a rider. I find great joy in going out to see him daily, not dread. And I agree with those who think that's a good indication whether or not to try to keep going or change paths.
                              Originally posted by Silverbridge
                              If you get anything on your Facebook feed about who is going to the Olympics in 2012 or guessing the outcome of Bush v Gore please start threads about those, too.

                              Comment


                              • #35
                                Would OP care to come back with an update?

                                Know I am late but this is a good topic with input from those who have faced the same situation.

                                Have shared this one before, rescued one (really, embarrasing bag of bones) out of a field who was about an 8 mover on a 4 month trim with 3 shoes left. Rumor was he had done some jumping so we grabbed him really cheap.

                                Tatoo said he was 8 and backstory was full of holes but indications were no rated shows, no record under the show name he had for several years...he may or may not have done some timber or steeplecasing depending on who you believed, but there was no record of any starts under his JC name.

                                Turned him out, fattened him up and had pro rides as I could afford them. He was fancy but erratic-as in out of the blue blow ups. Chalked it up to lack of a regular program for too many years.

                                Had a financial windfall after about a year and he went into a full time training program, got a complete physical, ulcer meds, lameness eval and appropriate maintainance, fancy shoes and pad$$$. I got a better saddle that really fit him and took 2 to 3 lessons a week schooling around 3'6" plus riding alot of others.

                                We hit 16 AA shows that year, Pro did the First Years, got some jogs and pastels. I did the 2'6" due to the fact he still would flake out occasionally, I did real well but wanted to go to 3' real bad. Even with the really good Pros, he did not take a joke well. I paid for my bad jokes with a concussion, cracked ribs and alot of embarrasement. Looked good in the hack though.

                                Sooo I spend all that winter riding my tail off and paying for alot of Pro rides...he is doing pretty good by now but still erratic at times. THIS is the year. He's been in the full program a year, I am riding alot and, honestly, well. One week had taken the 2 lessons, hacked another 2 times, he'd been out 4 or 5 hours. Just riding around the indoor with about 6 other people doing the same thing.

                                He blew. No reason. Just trotting around. Not spooky. Just blew. I bailed before he knocked into somebody else, landed on feet hanging on to him and got him out of the ring. Came back and told trainer he was gone.

                                Time, alot (as in alot alot) of money, vet care, farrier, best riding available. Resulting in...what he was when we started. Just fatter and with a better "wardrobe". I don't believe in blaming breeding so won't mention he was a Mr P grandson on top and a S. Bid grandson on the bottom. The first known to get some that are erratic the other some that were chronically....overambitious.

                                I should have bailed after that first year. Took a jerk, did everything right. Ended up with a jerk. Not a friendly type on the ground either. I have no idea what he would be happy doing but it sure was not what I wanted him to do.

                                Funny thing, 2 weeks later a sale TB mare came into the barn. Backstory was owner only had her for 6 months and it was a total mismatch-mare was talented but quirky, she was scared of the mare. I wasn't and they took the gelding as partial trade in and sold him on to Wisconsin or something. Showed that one for years at 3' and then a few at 2'6" and retired her at 21 after 11 years of ownership.

                                Sometimes it's just not meant to be and sending them along is best for both.
                                When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

                                The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.

                                Comment


                                • #36
                                  findeight, i always love your wisdom.

                                  Comment

                                  • Original Poster

                                    #37
                                    UPDATE! SORRY SO LONG!

                                    UPDATE ON THE BOY! So recently had the vet come take a look and get his thoughts! Everything checked out ok! With that said, we doesnt recommend checking for ulcers just yet, seeing as how he worries a lot anyways, switch a few things around before hauling off to the clinic. As fate has stepped in, soon we will be moving to a different barn and turnout will not be an issue. I cant wait to see if this will make a difference!

                                    Lately, the times that I have gotten to ride, when the weather isnt nasty, have been great! Only slight spooks when walking to the ring! Hes really moving off my leg now and cantering around nicely! SOO happy with my man! For 3 bad rides, 1 nice one makes up for it! You know that feeling you get when you know you have made some progress, Yep, I got it!

                                    Comment


                                    • #38
                                      Glad to hear that things are going so well


                                      seeing as how he worries a lot anyways,
                                      This is all the reason in the world to either scope for ulcers or simply treat (no known side effects to the drugs when used appropriately) - as it is often several hundred $$ to scope (depending on area), many people opt to just trial ulcer meds.

                                      Merial Ulcerguard
                                      Canadian Omeprazole
                                      "Blue Pop Rocks" - search the forum for many posts on the topic.

                                      Incidence of ulcers in TB's is close to 80% - there is a study done on pastured broodmares & foals (that exhibited almost no classic ulcer symptoms), but scoping revealed over 50% with ulcers.

                                      Comment


                                      • #39
                                        Originally posted by Meliora View Post
                                        It is such a personal decision, but I think when you stop looking forward to going to the barn and riding...that is when something has to give. Horses are a huge financial and emotional expense, that somewhere- something should be fun. Even if it is just decompressing while watching your horse graze.

                                        Every person has different goals and abilities, and if the horse doesn't fit than finding the right situation for the horse (and giving yourself a chance to have a horse that does fit those goals and abilities) is the best situation. Life is short...enjoy as many moments as you can
                                        To make this as short as possible, THIS!!

                                        I had a mare that we bought as a coming two year old. She was a fireball from the get-go. Fast forward 5 years and she turned out to be one hell of a jumper. She is a peanut in the jumper ring at 15.0 on a tall day, but could jump 3'6" like a rockstar.

                                        Problem was, I could NOT ride this mare. I could lead and tack her, but I couldn't even walk her on the buckle, let alone do anything else with her under saddle. Trainer rode her like a dream, hubby showed her and kicked ass on her (she never lost in 6 outings), students loved her, but I couldn't even get her to stand at the block to get on!

                                        Girlfriend had my number and it was time for her to go. I now have a 16.2 13 year old Tb mare from HPAF in Florida (we've been BFFs for 3 1/2 years now). She and I... we click. Bella is my girl. She takes a joke like a champ and we are a team. THIS is the horse for me.

                                        Meloria knows all too well about clicking with a horse, because the horse that didn't work for me, is her dream horse. I know that fireball mare will have a forever home with Heather, just as Bella has a forever home with me.

                                        If it doesn't work out for you, everything happens for a reason. The horse that frustrates and saddens you, might be someone else's dream.

                                        If it works out for you, OP, wonderful. If it doesn't (and you've tried everything), calling it quits doesn't mean you are failing, you're just helping someone else find their dream horse!
                                        Steppin Not Dragon "Bella"
                                        Top Shelf "Charlie"
                                        Check out the Military + Horses fb page!

                                        Comment


                                        • #40
                                          Originally posted by Ponytime224 View Post
                                          .... I have the help of a trainer and wanna give this guy a chance. He is a hunter prospect, beautiful and a lovely mOver. But just don't know how much spookin I can take! Agh help!
                                          How much grain? How much turnout? Often this behavior is curable with a change of management. If he's still spooky with 24/7 turnout and minimal grain, you may just have one that is too "emotionally fragile" for the job you want him to do.
                                          madeline
                                          * What you release is what you teach * Don't be distracted by unwanted behavior* Whoever waits the longest is the teacher. Van Hargis

                                          Comment

                                          Working...
                                          X