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Etiquette when someone comes to see a horse you have for sale?

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  • Etiquette when someone comes to see a horse you have for sale?

    I am selling a horse for the first time, so I just wanted to know what was expected when someone came to look at your horse. Like if they ride him, say they love him, ask about a trial, etc. and then never call/email you....?

    Backstory - horse was for sale - ad ran out and I did not renew because I am pregnant and can't exactly keep a horse marketable in this state! A friend of Hubby's is a trainer and she said she had seen his ad in the past and was interested in him for a client. I said he's technically off the market, but I'll allow you to come out and try him. They did - he was great despite having been out of regular work awhile already. Said they loved him, asked about a trial, etc. Never heard from them. Been almost three weeks! Hubby saw her yesterday and she said he's "at the top of the list." If that is so, wouldn't they have said something to me in the past three weeks?!

    Pony is actually on full lease on my farm now and I am totally happy with that as I really didn't want to sell him anyways, so this is a win-win (was just trying to cut back to one horse to ride since I am going to have a human child now!), but I just wondered for those of you who have sold horses in the past - is it normal for a potential buyer to come, ride a horse, say they love it, and then drop off the face of the earth but say they are still interested? Hubby did not seek her out, she came to him. I just think it's weird, every time I've looked at horses, I kept the seller in the loop - never just dropped off for weeks with no "yay, nay, or maybe"

  • #2
    Since you are not actively marketing the horse they are likely thinking that they can take their time and look around. I would be thinking that based on what you wrote. Buying a horse is a big deal and I would take advantage of the time so everything else out there.

    That said, I bought my horse within a week of seeing him, right after the PPE but he was actively being advertised.

    Edit: Congrats on your upcoming endeavor !

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    • #3
      Originally posted by HappyHorselover View Post
      is it normal for a potential buyer to come, ride a horse, say they love it, and then drop off the face of the earth but say they are still interested?
      Yes, it's very common. Probably as common as the potential buyers not showing up in the first place. I think usually they are not yanking your chain, something changed, (found a different horse, decided not to buy at all), but I know how frustrating it is to get your hopes up.

      As Stolen Virtue points out, if he isn't actively on the market now they may feel like they have more time

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      • #4
        I bet they have another horse to go look at, or he is at the top of their budget and the buyer wants to see if they can find something better/more in their price range.
        Freeing worms from cans everywhere!

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        • #5
          I would say, as others did, that this happens a lot more than you would think. It seems that in the time since they saw the horse you have leased him out? Is that month by month or for a longer period of time? Maybe they heard about this and have assumed that they have more time?

          Sounds like it worked out for you in the end but this does happen. Or people that talk to you for weeks via phone or email and "plan" to come down but just stop talking to you. Which is fine but no one likes to waste their time. I would appreciate a simple- he isn't what I am looking for or I found something else but such is life.

          I hope that everything works out for you.
          www.equestrianathart.com

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          • #6
            And then some people have the attitude that if he isn't there when they are ready to purchase, then it wasn't meant to be.
            http://community.webshots.com/user/summitspringsfarm

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            • #7
              Nearly everyone that came to see my horse LOVED him. They all expressed what a great horse he was, and how good their rider looked on him. Never heard from the majority of them again.

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              • #8
                Agree with the others, they know you said he wasn't being actively marketed, so they don't feel any rush and are seeing if there are better/less $$ horses.

                Also agree that its common for people to sound like they want the horse and never hear from them again.
                Epona Farm
                Irish Draughts and Irish Draught Sport horses

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                • #9
                  Firstly, three weeks in the scheme of buying a horse isn't that long, especially if the horse is off the market.

                  Secondly, they may want you to think they are taking the horse more seriously than they are...I have no sense of what this horse is like, but many/most potential buyers, especially if they have a personal connection with you won't tell you they hate your horse, they just will fall of the face of the earth and "go with another option." This may or may not be the case, depending on the quality of your horse, his rideability, and price.
                  “Don’t ask yourself what the world needs; ask yourself what makes you come alive. And then go and do that. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive.” -Howard Thurman
                  (}---{)

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                  • Original Poster

                    #10
                    Originally posted by hequestrian View Post
                    I would say, as others did, that this happens a lot more than you would think. It seems that in the time since they saw the horse you have leased him out? Is that month by month or for a longer period of time? Maybe they heard about this and have assumed that they have more time?

                    Sounds like it worked out for you in the end but this does happen. Or people that talk to you for weeks via phone or email and "plan" to come down but just stop talking to you. Which is fine but no one likes to waste their time. I would appreciate a simple- he isn't what I am looking for or I found something else but such is life.

                    I hope that everything works out for you.
                    He is leased to a friend. She comes here to my farm to ride him and my other horse. It's open ended, but allows him to stay here. Not that I needed to sell him, just felt he was going to be "wasted" if I only had time to ride one after baby, and chose the other one because he is an easier ride who is the same every time and doesn't need to be in a consistent program to do his best like the other does. I was really only trying to sell because I felt pressure from all sides to have such a nice horse be "wasted." Now he's not - my friend loves him, and he's still in my backyard, which is perfect.

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                    • Original Poster

                      #11
                      Originally posted by Cacique View Post
                      Firstly, three weeks in the scheme of buying a horse isn't that long, especially if the horse is off the market.

                      Secondly, they may want you to think they are taking the horse more seriously than they are...I have no sense of what this horse is like, but many/most potential buyers, especially if they have a personal connection with you won't tell you they hate your horse, they just will fall of the face of the earth and "go with another option." This may or may not be the case, depending on the quality of your horse, his rideability, and price.
                      I must be weird then - because when buying all three of mine, I was very quick to respond to the sellers about whether I was interested or not. Doesn't seem to be the norm from the posts!

                      He is a very athletic, fancy horse, and was priced very low (not gonna find much cheaper unless they go to a straight off the track adoption) as he is still a little green at 10 because he spent like 3 years just sitting in a field between coming off the track and going into re-training. He's had a lot of schooling miles and pro training, but not a lot of showing (only a few schooling hunter shows) He's pretty cool

                      I'm just gonna keep him, Hubby will have to deal!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by HappyHorselover View Post
                        I must be weird then - because when buying all three of mine, I was very quick to respond to the sellers about whether I was interested or not. Doesn't seem to be the norm from the posts!
                        I was like this when shopping too. I had to go through 2 failed PPE's but when I tried the horses and liked them the check for me to take the horse on trial for the PPE was in the owners hand the next day. And for the second I leased the horse for a month (on their farm) but she wasn't sound when it came time for PPE. Found Houston and they knew I wanted him but negotiations took a bit longer for him because I couldn't bring him home for trial.

                        Sounds like your pony will continue to get the great care and love that you want him to get and you get to keep your eyes on him so that is great.
                        www.equestrianathart.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Congratulations... sounds like things are falling in place rightly for you!
                          Yes, a win-win on your pony & friend -- who in time you may feel comfortable offering him to her for sale.. if, selling him is your ultimately goal.

                          People? yes, common. Ive had folks say they are going home for their trailer and never heard from them again.! In the past 2 days, in a flurry of phone calls-emails, a lady wanted first dibs on a horse appt --sure, she called first -- so set for Tuesday since She said today was bad due to rain..ok... so she calls tonight at 9pm saying she bought a horse today, AND............had a little money left over if I was willing to sell my horse for that amount (half the price). A very polite > no.

                          But, it was ME who dodged the bullet with this impulsive buyer -- and it may all just be a *story* to get my horse priced down -- who knows, who cares, it doesnt matter.
                          When you simply do good business, you weather through the rest. (and sometimes have good stories to tell over lots of glasses of wine).
                          IN GOD WE TRUST
                          OTTB's ready to show/event/jumpers. Track ponies for perfect trail partners.
                          http://www.horseville.com/php/search...=1&ssid=057680

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                          • #14
                            Shoot my trainer had a jr. client looking for horse, parents for some reason felt they knew more than anyone. Had a lovely, typey horse on trial for I think a month and lowballed an offer. Horse went back to owner A YEAR later, still looking for a horse there was one who was an absolute saint, marched down to the jumps easy peasy ride perfect for this kid but he'd been a bit neglected so despite my trainer saying he'd gain weight they turned him down and asked if the first horse was available!

                            I think with anything in sales it just happens whether it's a horse, a car, house, vacation etc. People express interest and don't want to disappoint anyone so just go away.

                            Sounds like you've established a win-win situation right now anyway.

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                            • #15
                              I think the situation you describe is very normal. Buyers often like, or "love," or "put at the top of their list" a horse when they try it and still don't end up buying it. I would assume these folks are not truly interested, don't worry about it, and continue on as you have been with your lease.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Maybe call them and follow up? I've done that in the past. Potential buyer was lagging a little and I followed up with an email, asked if they were still interested in coming and seeing the horse, and that got them in gear, they drove the 12 hours to come see him, made an offer on the spot and within a week he was paid for and on his way.

                                Then there have been buyers who have drug there feet for months, "we're still interested" but things just didn't fall into place for them.

                                Everything works out as it should, generally. The right person will come along for your horse, and ultimately, that is what is most important....
                                Stoneybrook Farm Afton TN

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Yes, I have had buyers do this before several times. It reminds me of that guy you have an amazing first date with where he talks about all the things you're going to do together, and then you never hear from him again!

                                  If the perspective buyers express serious interest, I see nothing wrong with following up in a few weeks to see where they're at. I have done this in the past. It can't hurt. Good luck

                                  Comment

                                  • Original Poster

                                    #18
                                    Originally posted by brightskyfarm View Post
                                    Congratulations... sounds like things are falling in place rightly for you!
                                    Yes, a win-win on your pony & friend -- who in time you may feel comfortable offering him to her for sale.. if, selling him is your ultimately goal.
                                    I honestly couldn't be happier having her leasing him - and she knows if she was ever in the place to own, he could be hers. But I am fine feeding him and having his adorable face in my backyard forever if that's how it goes! Just so happy she and he are enjoying each other right now (and she's keeping my main ride in shape for me while I'm preggo too, so it's awesome!)


                                    Originally posted by tidy rabbit View Post
                                    Maybe call them and follow up? I've done that in the past. Potential buyer was lagging a little and I followed up with an email, asked if they were still interested in coming and seeing the horse, and that got them in gear, they drove the 12 hours to come see him, made an offer on the spot and within a week he was paid for and on his way.

                                    Then there have been buyers who have drug there feet for months, "we're still interested" but things just didn't fall into place for them.

                                    Everything works out as it should, generally. The right person will come along for your horse, and ultimately, that is what is most important....
                                    No way, I'm done with trying to sell him since he's leased! If they wanted him, they'd come to me. I told them I only want to sell him if the right person comes along. Guess it's not them! I wish my friend was in a place to own, she's great for him. But it's not like it costs me much to keep him, he lives out 24/7, is barefoot (even when jumping out XC, he has awesome feet, esp for a TB!), and just a sweet boy. This situation is perfect really, I'm glad to be done trying to sell him. Just wondered if my experience with these buyers was normal! Seems it was

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      When selling, you can't get too wrapped up in worrying about what buyers are thinking. Better to just take buyers at face value. Generally I assume that if someone wants to buy a horse they will actually buy the horse. Sure, every once in a while someone will call you back a week or so later after thinking about it, but thats more of an exception.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        I need to throw something in here as well - as someone currently horse shopping, I have a really hard time telling someone their horse isn't what I want. I've seen enough situations where someone gets offended (a lot of times these are in situations where the owner is selling the horse, rather than the trainer), or they want to argue with me or try to reason with me and somehow explain that the horse actually is what I want. That just gets awkward.

                                        I try to be very respectful when I try horses. If I'm looking for an uphill jumper ride, and I get on a horse with a more downhill hunter frame, I've gotten off within ten minutes, saying it wasn't the right ride for me. In some cases, this is appreciated by the seller, since I'm not burning up their horse for no reason. In other cases, people are pissed off, since they've taken the time and energy to get the horse ready, set up the appointment, etc.....this is what makes horse shopping so hard, as opposed to car shopping. A car has x number of miles, it either has the features you want or it doesn't.....it's pretty objective. A horse is SOOOOOO much harder - even if it looks just right on video, you can get on and sometimes know in ten minutes that it isn't the right fit, and other times, if it is a bit different than what you are used to, it might take longer to figure out one way or the other.

                                        I think also in this economy, there are so many people so desperate to sell horses, it's very hard as a buyer to let people down. Personally, it's harder to face that disappointment and explain why it won't work than to just not contact the person again. Yes, it's a chicken s**t way to do it, but when people have so many emotions invested in the process, you start to run out of emotional reserves to deal with making lots of people unhappy.

                                        And this doesn't even touch the scenario where someone thinks a horse is worth WAY more than you would be willing to pay for it. Try explaining that to someone once, and you'll understand why people tend to take the path of least resistance. I'm not saying it's right, and I try not to do it, but I can certainly understand it.

                                        Sorry - needed to vent for a minute....

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