• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Children. Grrrr...

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #61
    It is a safety issue. The entitled kids previously mentioned are allowed to run around and "experience" everything as if it were a petting zoo. Climbing in the tractor bucket, etc., getting behind the wheel of the golf cart and "driving." How would these people feel if they came out of the supermarket and some kid were behind the wheel of their car "driving"? We have a ton of new lesson kids, and to their families, it's a trip to the park. Fido comes song, all the little brothers and sister, Grandma in her walker. That's a lot of not very fast moving people ambling along and taking up the whole barn aisle when I'm trying to hand walk my horse.

    I know they are just showing their support and their sense of wonder at the beauty of these creatures, but it does get old. I hope the kids keep riding and taking lessons, and help keep the riding facilities economically viable, I really do. I just lose patience when I have so little time to get my horse taken care of but I always have to be on the lookout for toddlers.
    2012 goal: learn to ride like a Barn Rat

    A helmet saved my life.

    Comment


    • #62
      It's just consideration for others, that's all it is, to not have your kids make a mess or dogs run off-leash. And the so-called parents (they're not, they're people who had children but don't have the intelligence to be parents) who don't manage their kids are being totally self-absorbed.

      Everyone has to be well-bhaved and the ones responsible for dogs and kids have to be willing to be responsible. So many parents won't be that.

      But the BMs who allow this to take place on their premises are ultimately responsible and if they don't want to find themselves in court... they might want to start enforcing rules.

      Comment


      • #63
        And we all wonder why kids aren't getting into riding anymore. Could it be the crotchety old biddies whining about them? I'm sure it is. We ride hunters/jumpers but have our horses at a cattle penning/sorting barn. My horses are turned out with a herd of cattle most days . When there is a penning there are horses tied up and down the barn isle. My horses are stalled right by the indoor. They see all the commotion. People even tie there horses in front of my stallions stall and *GASP* he doesn't do anything. Why? He's used to it and knows how to behave. BO's have kids. There are big wheels and bikes in the barn. My grandson rides them in the isle while I do stalls. None of the horses care. Seriously you people are taking all the fun out of everything. I wouldn't want to be in your barns if they were free. Kids are kids. Life is too short to whine about everything. My barn at my house is empty. It's too quiet, no fun. I much prefer the cutting barn.

        Comment


        • #64
          Originally posted by CHSatwork View Post
          And we all wonder why kids aren't getting into riding anymore. Could it be the crotchety old biddies whining about them? I'm sure it is. We ride hunters/jumpers but have our horses at a cattle penning/sorting barn. My horses are turned out with a herd of cattle most days . When there is a penning there are horses tied up and down the barn isle. My horses are stalled right by the indoor. They see all the commotion. People even tie there horses in front of my stallions stall and *GASP* he doesn't do anything. Why? He's used to it and knows how to behave. BO's have kids. There are big wheels and bikes in the barn. My grandson rides them in the isle while I do stalls. None of the horses care. Seriously you people are taking all the fun out of everything. I wouldn't want to be in your barns if they were free. Kids are kids. Life is too short to whine about everything. My barn at my house is empty. It's too quiet, no fun. I much prefer the cutting barn.
          So you'd be cool if a random kid were running inbetween your horses legs and detroying the property too, right?

          I think I speak for most people when I say we have no problems with well behaved kids who are supervised. Its the unsupervised destructive ones whos parents are too busy with the horse that we are complaining about.

          Comment


          • #65
            I get to see what happens when children are raised without discipline and expectations: I teach 8th grade. I have 99% great, reasonable, considerate 13-14 year old kids in class. But that 1%!! Oy.

            So cute when they are 3-4 pulling that crap, not so funny at 14 in school.

            Same stuff in public or at a barn--I hear you OP. I love kids! They are super people, but I expect parents of said kids to manage them and instill in them a modicum of common sense and consideration for others. When they don't, I will be the first to tell them to stop.

            Horses don't have to "get over it". I expect a safe, relatively quiet and stable environment to ride in at a boarding barn or show. That is safe and produces a quality experience for everyone involved. Can the aisle (yeah, that's how it is spelled) be a bit active, with kids/wheelbarrows/dogs? Sure, unless those things cause a safety issue, then they stop.

            I reamed a pair of tween girls at a show once, and was applauded by the manager. Large show facility with a huge indoor that is surrounded on 3 sides (inside) with a wide concrete apron. Said children were using roller blades and a dog to entertain themselves during the show. After being asked twice in my hearing to stop they didn't. I halted my horse during a break for schooling and told them to get their mom (she was close by) and I then told them all to GET OUT. You were asked nicely, now you are being told. I explained, briefly how dangerous their behavior was, how inconsiderate, etc. Judge overheard the whole conversation and thanked me, too. Mom should have managed her kids. She didn't, so I did for her.
            Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!

            Comment


            • #66
              Occassionally the kids will run up on a horse when they are playing and not paying attention. They're kids. It happens. They do appologize. None of these kids destroy anything. None of the people who come to the pennings have kids that destroy anything. Hmmmm I'm starting to think this is an "English" rider problem. I've been doing this 40 years. Yes I enjoy riding english and jumping. I just can't tolerate the "English" barn environment. I have yet to see kids like those described at "western" barns. I wonder

              Comment


              • #67
                Weird CHS- Just the opposite experience for me. I don't think this is a riding discipline issue, it is a KID issue and more importantly, a parent issue.

                Look, I spend thousands of dollars every year to ride my quite expensive horse. I'd like to maximize every ride, not manage some dimwit kid. Kids will do dumb things, that's expected. But in a barn/riding situation, those dumb things can have serious consequences.

                And, I'll say this, the Western folks I know/ride with, it is a more shall we say, casual atmosphere (no helmets, lots of yahooing around, halter and bareback, riding in the aisle) that I find unsafe all the way around. And when your fastest pace is a "tranter", a little spook might be the biggest rush of your day.
                Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!

                Comment


                • #68
                  Originally posted by CHSatwork View Post
                  Occassionally the kids will run up on a horse when they are playing and not paying attention. They're kids. It happens.
                  So, when the kids "run up on" a horse and it knocks them clean to next Sunday because it's startled, or in a bad mood, or kicking at a fly... Does that also just "happen"?

                  I think many folk here are more concerned about what might happen to the kids (and the ensuing horse-owner's liability) than worried about their precious pony being distracted.

                  Horses are unpredictable. Kids can get hurt. Unfortunately, parents can be litigious. Wanting to minimize risks seems reasonable.

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    Originally posted by paw View Post
                    So, when the kids "run up on" a horse and it knocks them clean to next Sunday because it's startled, or in a bad mood, or kicking at a fly... Does that also just "happen"?

                    I think many folk here are more concerned about what might happen to the kids (and the ensuing horse-owner's liability) than worried about their precious pony being distracted.

                    Horses are unpredictable. Kids can get hurt. Unfortunately, parents can be litigious. Wanting to minimize risks seems reasonable.
                    If I could "like" this, I would.

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      The kids at my barn rollerblade, skateboard, and play hockey in the barn aisle. IT definitely makes me nervous.
                      I am also all for horses being kid 'proof' dog 'proof' and loud noise 'proof', however when I was bringing my horse back to work after his injury, when he was filled sky high with the crazies from his time off/lack of work it definitely made things a bit dangerous for me!! And my horse IS pretty everything 'proof'! (Not so much the rollerblading/skateboarding ones, but another family with a baby that liked to open and slam shut the top of the mounting block)

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        Originally posted by CHSatwork View Post
                        Occassionally the kids will run up on a horse when they are playing and not paying attention. They're kids. It happens. They do appologize. None of these kids destroy anything. None of the people who come to the pennings have kids that destroy anything. Hmmmm I'm starting to think this is an "English" rider problem. I've been doing this 40 years. Yes I enjoy riding english and jumping. I just can't tolerate the "English" barn environment. I have yet to see kids like those described at "western" barns. I wonder
                        If you don't like here, feel free to leave. I'm sure you can find a message board full of squealing, jumping, running, banshee-yodeling children anywhere.

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          My first barn was mostly western, and my very young Arab was exposed to everything crazy. I'll never forget leading him out and a teenage girl really screaming and running towards us being chased by a teenage boy hell bent for catching her
                          I braced for an explosion and.. Nothing. He apparently, unlike me, could distinguish fun screams from chaos and must have known the kids in question
                          If my Arab were 17 hands and spooky, I would not feel so sanguine about it.
                          Last edited by Chall; Jan. 16, 2012, 09:17 AM.

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            Wow. So much venom spitting here.

                            No, disrespectful/out of control kids without supervision should not be around unpredictable 1200 lb animals.

                            That said, yes, horses DO need to "get over" some things. Isn't that what training is all about?

                            If you ever want to take your horse off property where things aren't always in your control (debatable anyway), horses should be exposed to as much as possible. Kids, dogs, bicycles and motorized vehicles all can be seen out on the trail even.

                            I sympathize with those with greenies or horses coming back from injuries-BTDT- but really, there are risks we take when riding and handling horses. Our job is to minimize these risks to ourselves, our horses and others.

                            We can't expect non-horsey people/kids we encounter to know how to act around horses. They'll need some guidance. Don't think part of your job is to be an equine ambassador? Think back to your beginnings with horses and the people that helped get you started.

                            Comment


                            • #74
                              I think all adults should be supervised..

                              Or put on a leash.

                              Here's what you do if you want no children in your barn, ever.

                              1. Don't have any.

                              2. Buy your own barn, and your own show facility.

                              3. Don't be all surprised if no one shows up.

                              Really guys, most of the adults I've come across are far worse than the children. Don't get your panties in a wad and start yelling lawsuit. I've never actually met anyone that got sued for failing to supervise their child and having it get hurt.

                              Riding is suposed to be fun, and if you all get bitchy and whiny, well, go over to eventerland and see what the rider says when a horse runs out on course when he's galloping toward something 4 feet high that won't fall down if his horse hits it. Who's owners paid a lot of money for, to compete in an event that happens Once a Year, that is an Olympic and WEG qualifier, not some local show.

                              He said nothing, "just part of the game,".

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                Originally posted by 2ndyrgal View Post
                                I've never actually met anyone that got sued for failing to supervise their child and having it get hurt.
                                Of course not. It's the poor person minding her own business when that child runs in front of her horse or car and gets hurt that is sued. No one can sue the negligent a-hole parents.
                                Holy crap, how does Darwin keep missing you? ~Lauruffian

                                Comment


                                • #76
                                  [QUOTE=ElisLove;6083264]The kids at my barn rollerblade, skateboard, and play hockey in the barn aisle. IT definitely makes me nervous.
                                  QUOTE]

                                  Oh He!! NO!!! That would not be tolerated. My child is respectful and actually said to a judge (she is 4 mind you so thank gosh everyone laughed) at a HB show from the rail

                                  "Don't walk behind a horse!!!"

                                  My barn kid plopped her hand over my child's mouth and whisked her away. Then we had to discuss what judges (and adults) are allowed to do....and what little people ARE NOT.
                                  Come to the dark side, we have cookies

                                  Comment


                                  • #77
                                    I started riding at a barn that had both Western and English instruction. There were a great number of kids around. We learned very quickly: Thou Shalt Not Run In The Barn. Thou Shalt Not Scream In The Barn. Thou Shalt Make Thine Horse Aware Of Your Presence If You Walk Up Behind Him. Thusly Shall Thou Not Get Hurt. Children who refused to behave and parents who refused to make them were not invited back.

                                    Not an English or a Western thing. It's a safety thing. Darwin was a smart guy, but I doubt even he trusted to "survival of the fittest" to raise his kids.

                                    Don't get me started on unleashed dogs... there's one individual who unleashes his Golden Retriever, and, being happiness stuffed into a dog skin, the Golden gambols everywhere... including behind my not-so-dog-friendly horse. I've taken to shouting "Call your dog back, my horse kicks!" every time I see his person. Who is usually a quarter mile behind the dog. UGH.
                                    "I'm not always sarcastic. Sometimes I'm asleep." - Harry Dresden

                                    Amy's Stuff - Rustic chic and country linens and decor
                                    Support my mom! She's gotta finance her retirement horse somehow.

                                    Comment


                                    • #78
                                      Originally posted by cyberbay View Post
                                      It's just consideration for others, that's all it is, to not have your kids make a mess or dogs run off-leash. And the so-called parents (they're not, they're people who had children but don't have the intelligence to be parents) who don't manage their kids are being totally self-absorbed.
                                      ^This It's the heart of the issue.

                                      Perhaps if we were taught to Think of Others First/Be Considerate of Others First from wee ones on, like my mother taught me and reinforced it again and again and again, we'd not see quite the rash of ruffians we see everywhere, not just the barn.

                                      It started when I was very little...

                                      --"Suzie, please move the grocery cart to the side of the aisle, this lady needs to get by."

                                      --"Please hold the door for this gentleman since his hands are full."

                                      --"While you're filling that water bucket, ask Mrs. So-N-So if she would like you to fill her horse's too."

                                      If parents would Think of Others First (and horses too), they would teach it to their children and keep a shorter leash on their wee ones, as well as correct the behavior to reinforce the lesson of Looking Beyond Your Own Eyes.
                                      Last edited by ChocoMare; Jan. 16, 2012, 10:57 AM.
                                      <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- Being negative only makes a difficult journey more difficult. You may be given a cactus, but you don't have to sit on it.

                                      Comment


                                      • #79
                                        ChocoMare-- what a delightful post! Such parenting is a lost art for many, I'm afraid. However, I do find it amongst the parents of the kids who ride at our barn. Safety first, kindness and consideration in equal measure. I think there are two schools of thought at work in this thread:

                                        Those who feel that children should and can be taught to respect other people's right to ride/work in a calm, quiet, happy and safe barn/arena/show and those who feel "anything goes" and the devil take the hindmost. Well, not quite, but more along the lines of "my kid/dog/horse can behave the way they want and you all just get used to it".

                                        Sure, my horses and I can handle noise and upset (we show hunters and have encountered flying chairs, umbrellas, dogs in the ring, hats, Harley's, ambulances, flying tents, garbage cans, loud music, loud people, running children, running adults, and portapotties that are seemingly haunted). Should I have to encounter all those things on a daily basis?

                                        No. Control your dog and child, and I'll control my horse and my temper.
                                        Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!

                                        Comment


                                        • #80
                                          What's the big deal? Lock the kids and the dogs in a stall....The same stall.

                                          Comment

                                          Working...
                                          X