Stallion Spotlight

Sir Donnerhall_02Beelitz

Real Estate Spotlight

100_7261
  • Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You�re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the Forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it�details of personal disputes may be better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts, though are not legally obligated to do so, regardless of content.

Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting. Moderators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts unless they have been alerted and have determined that a post, thread or user has violated the Forums� policies. Moderators do not regularly independently monitor the Forums for such violations.

Profanity, outright vulgarity, blatant personal insults or otherwise inappropriate statements will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

Users may provide their positive or negative experiences with or opinions of companies, products, individuals, etc.; however, accounts involving allegations of criminal behavior against named individuals or companies MUST be first-hand accounts and may NOT be made anonymously.

If a situation has been reported upon by a reputable news source or addressed by law enforcement or the legal system it is open for discussion, but if an individual wants to make their own claims of criminal behavior against a named party in the course of that discussion, they too must identify themselves by first and last name and the account must be first-person.

Criminal allegations that do not satisfy these requirements, when brought to our attention, may be removed pending satisfaction of these criteria, and we reserve the right to err on the side of caution when making these determinations.

Credible threats of suicide will be reported to the police along with identifying user information at our disposal, in addition to referring the user to suicide helpline resources such as 1-800-SUICIDE or 1-800-273-TALK.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it�s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users� profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses � Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it�s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who�s selling it, it doesn�t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions � Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services � Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products � While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements � Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be �bumped� excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues � Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators� discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the �alert� button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your �Ignore� list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you�d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user�s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 5/9/18)
See more
See less

thoughts on this training concept?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #61
    Thought I'd share this, as it covers a related topic and provides some excellent visuals of what is being talked about. The narative he provides is excellent, as well.

    "How To Engage Your Horse's Back"
    BAEN's 2-Minute How To Video - with Will Faerber (Master Horseman/Classical Dressage Trainer)

    http://www.bayequest.info/2minvideo/109.htm

    Comment


    • #62
      To answer some of the questions, honestly it does take 2 very important elements, a certain amount Finesse and Patience.

      Once your horse gets the idea, he'll improve greatly and rather quickly.

      You need to be consistent and not just try this and then go back to your old style of riding.

      That does not mean you let your horses head stay low, it means he picks his head up, but also keeps his back raised.

      You'll get it and lose it lots of times, but progress is what you are after, building muscle structure.
      http://community.webshots.com/user/summitspringsfarm

      Comment


      • #63
        Originally posted by englishivy View Post
        Come play with us! I am looking for a late Jan/early Feb clinic at my farm!!

        She also goes to Four Seasons Farm with Kat DeMas Mulkey quite often, and she is in Madison too. Much less of a trek for you (but we are fun and well worth the drive )
        Have y'all set a date? This thread makes me really want to ride with her ASAP.

        Comment


        • #64
          Originally posted by Summit Springs Farm View Post

          That does not mean you let your horses head stay low, it means he picks his head up, but also keeps his back raised.

          You'll get it and lose it lots of times, but progress is what you are after, building muscle structure.
          This is also what the dressage trainer in the video said. You raise the poll and if the back hollows than you let him lower his head again. The horse can't raise his head and stay round through the back without the necessary musculature.

          Comment


          • #65
            Date is set!

            Originally posted by OveroHunter View Post
            Have y'all set a date? This thread makes me really want to ride with her ASAP.

            She is coming our way Sat Feb 18th, weather permitting (which I am starting to feel is more like "god willing"...what is the up with this weather! )

            Anyone who would like to audit is welcome to come out; we usually do some sort of pot-luck hang out, so if you want to eat you have to bring something to share . You can PM me for more info.
            www.englishivyfarms.com
            Hunters, Jumpers, & Welsh Ponies
            All I pay my psychiatrist is the cost of feed and hay, and he'll listen to me any day. ~Author Unknown

            Comment


            • #66
              I have to chime in. My initial reaction to this video (not knowing anything about Anne) was that I cannot comprehend anyone being a good/knowledgeable trainer who lets a horse poke around like this one. FORWARD is the most basic principle -- whether hunters or dressage. And, I really doubt whether her version of "long and low" is likely to result in ANY changes to the horse's musculature if his hind end isn't being asked to work AT ALL. Quite honestly I felt rather horrified, because I view this as such a tremendously basic point.

              Having now looked at some pictures (posted on this thread) of horses that have been in training with Anne, that appear to be going well, and have correct musculature -- I felt quite a bit more comforted.

              But -- I would not put that training video on my website. Perhaps I really don't understand what she's doing. True, if your choice is to have a lazy/pokey horse with his head up, or a lazy pokey horse with his head down -- I'd choose the latter. But that seems like minimal progress to me. I cannot understand why she wouldn't ask the rider to at least urge him on.

              Comment


              • #67
                Originally posted by fatappy View Post
                Someone more educated than me, please, enlighten.

                Everyone keeps saying slow: Slow the walk to the pace that they can carry. If I slow my ottb then I end up like the horse was in the beginning of the video. Inverted, head up, tounge out, etc. I am not saying my horse can't be slowed down, I guess what I am trying to say is if i hold her at slow, she gets tight. So my question is, are we looking for slow, or what the horse is comfortable with? And also, if you only go at the pace your horse can carry, how do they build up? Do you continue to ask them to keep stepping forward? If so when do you know if your horse is competent at this pace, time to ask for more?

                Sorry for all the questions. I am intrigued by this. I have trained with eventers that push into the bridle and that didn't fit well with my OTTB. So we have geared down and are working on slowing down her body to slow down her mind and this would be great for her to work on!
                The key is to slow the horse down from your seat, not your hand.

                Of course, horses aren't born knowing how to respond to a seat aid, so you have to teach them. And to teach them, you help him understand with your hand.

                So.
                Firstly, I think for whatever psychological reason the trot walk transition is easier for the horse than the walk halt. So pick up a trot, sit and "hold" him slower, and expect a walk.
                You won't get one, because he doesn't know yet, so after a stride or two of seat-request, use your hand along with the seat to slow him to a walk, then a halt, then gently back two steps.
                Repeat until you can get the walk transition without using your hand (if you get a walk without any hand, there is no need to halt and back. This is part of the reward for getting it right.)
                Do this over and over -so, 10 or 15 steps of trot only at a time before you ask again for a walk. Then three or four steps of walk and then 10 or 15 steps of trot to start the teaching process again.


                Now that he understands the basic mechanics of a "seat-whoa", ride him and monitor very closely whether he is "under your seat" or barging out ahead of your seat into your hand. If you feel him "get past your seat" even a step, do a seat-whoa and if you don't get an answer immediately back it up with hand. Eventually you will feel when he starts to rush out from underneath you within the gait, and you can ask him to "hold up, stay here with me" with a seat-whoa for a stride.

                It is very important to let him make the mistake, rather than trying to prevent them. Trying to prevent a horse from going too fast just means you constantly ride with the hand brake on. Like you said, if you "hold her at slow"...
                Don't hold her at slow: LET HER get quick for a step and then CORRECT it, she will learn to maintain the proper pace on her own.

                Once you have this level of control of the pace FROM YOUR SEAT, you can let go with your hands and send him forward into freedom (or into a positive, flowing contact) instead of a pace-monitoring hand.
                The Noodlehttp://tiny.cc/NGKmT&http://tiny.cc/gioSA
                Jinxyhttp://tiny.cc/PIC798&http://tiny.cc/jinx364
                Boy Wonderhttp://tiny.cc/G9290
                The Hana is nuts! NUTS!!http://tinyurl.com/SOCRAZY

                Comment


                • #68
                  Originally posted by rileyt View Post
                  FORWARD is the most basic principle -- whether hunters or dressage.
                  It is also the most misunderstood basic principle.
                  At a lot of stages of training, a too-forward ride is just rushing.

                  When I came out of hunter world into dressage with my hair all on fire about "FORWARD!" the clinicians were constantly telling me to slow the eff down and let the horse learn to engage and carry.

                  You CAN NOT engage a horse if the front end is running away from the hind.

                  I heard it over and over again from every. single. trainer. and they were right.
                  The Noodlehttp://tiny.cc/NGKmT&http://tiny.cc/gioSA
                  Jinxyhttp://tiny.cc/PIC798&http://tiny.cc/jinx364
                  Boy Wonderhttp://tiny.cc/G9290
                  The Hana is nuts! NUTS!!http://tinyurl.com/SOCRAZY

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    Originally posted by rileyt View Post
                    I have to chime in. My initial reaction to this video (not knowing anything about Anne) was that I cannot comprehend anyone being a good/knowledgeable trainer who lets a horse poke around like this one. FORWARD is the most basic principle -- whether hunters or dressage. And, I really doubt whether her version of "long and low" is likely to result in ANY changes to the horse's musculature if his hind end isn't being asked to work AT ALL. Quite honestly I felt rather horrified, because I view this as such a tremendously basic point.

                    Having now looked at some pictures (posted on this thread) of horses that have been in training with Anne, that appear to be going well, and have correct musculature -- I felt quite a bit more comforted.

                    But -- I would not put that training video on my website. Perhaps I really don't understand what she's doing. True, if your choice is to have a lazy/pokey horse with his head up, or a lazy pokey horse with his head down -- I'd choose the latter. But that seems like minimal progress to me. I cannot understand why she wouldn't ask the rider to at least urge him on.

                    She does not advocate pokey. She advocates slow feet which allow the horse to learn how/where to put feet and then pick up the pace as the horse strengthens and is more educated. You have to stablilize the horse first, then ask it to carry itself.

                    Most of the horses we deal with are rushing on the forehand (cause the riders with pokey forehand horses don't always know there is a problem....slow=safe and correct, right ). At the beginning stages of the reschool, if you ask for more pace, the horse will revert to old habits and get rushy on the forehand. Which leads to rider holding with their hands. Which leads to horse very on forehand. And we are back at square one.

                    If you aren't clear on why she goes slow at first, I highly suggest you send her an email to better discuss what she teaches. I can PM her email to you. Or you can watch the video about building topline in the other thread. The only true difference is the pace (she prefers slow at first, and they have more pace) but the concept is the same.

                    It is a very old method that, as others have said, has become a lost art.

                    And to throw some names out there, she trained and worked with both Holly (Hayes) Orlando and Laura Kent Kraut throughout their junior careers. She has told me first hand that these techniques were used to reschool a pony Laura had as a child. So it can't all be crazy
                    www.englishivyfarms.com
                    Hunters, Jumpers, & Welsh Ponies
                    All I pay my psychiatrist is the cost of feed and hay, and he'll listen to me any day. ~Author Unknown

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      Originally posted by meupatdoes View Post
                      It is also the most misunderstood basic principle.
                      At a lot of stages of training, a too-forward ride is just rushing.

                      When I came out of hunter world into dressage with my hair all on fire about "FORWARD!" the clinicians were constantly telling me to slow the eff down and let the horse learn to engage and carry.

                      You CAN NOT engage a horse if the front end is running away from the hind.

                      I heard it over and over again from every. single. trainer. and they were right.
                      This is for sure! Forward should mean more energy and perhaps larger length of stride. But with control of your tempo. My horse is balanced and strong enough that our forward now is far different from what our forward was when I got him two years ago - and while he was learning to have some movement in his back too much forward would have just been running him onto his nose. He built the strength where he picked himself up as I pushed him to the edge of what forward he could do and he learned to use his haunches/bend his hocks more.
                      If Kim Kardashian wants to set up a gofundme to purchase the Wu Tang album from Martin Shkreli, guess what people you DON'T HAVE TO DONATE.
                      -meupatdoes

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        Originally posted by meupatdoes View Post
                        The key is to slow the horse down from your seat, not your hand.

                        Of course, horses aren't born knowing how to respond to a seat aid, so you have to teach them. And to teach them, you help him understand with your hand.

                        So.
                        Firstly, I think for whatever psychological reason the trot walk transition is easier for the horse than the walk halt. So pick up a trot, sit and "hold" him slower, and expect a walk.
                        You won't get one, because he doesn't know yet, so after a stride or two of seat-request, use your hand along with the seat to slow him to a walk, then a halt, then gently back two steps.
                        Repeat until you can get the walk transition without using your hand (if you get a walk without any hand, there is no need to halt and back. This is part of the reward for getting it right.)
                        Do this over and over -so, 10 or 15 steps of trot only at a time before you ask again for a walk. Then three or four steps of walk and then 10 or 15 steps of trot to start the teaching process again.


                        Now that he understands the basic mechanics of a "seat-whoa", ride him and monitor very closely whether he is "under your seat" or barging out ahead of your seat into your hand. If you feel him "get past your seat" even a step, do a seat-whoa and if you don't get an answer immediately back it up with hand. Eventually you will feel when he starts to rush out from underneath you within the gait, and you can ask him to "hold up, stay here with me" with a seat-whoa for a stride.

                        It is very important to let him make the mistake, rather than trying to prevent them. Trying to prevent a horse from going too fast just means you constantly ride with the hand brake on. Like you said, if you "hold her at slow"...
                        Don't hold her at slow: LET HER get quick for a step and then CORRECT it, she will learn to maintain the proper pace on her own.

                        Once you have this level of control of the pace FROM YOUR SEAT, you can let go with your hands and send him forward into freedom (or into a positive, flowing contact) instead of a pace-monitoring hand.
                        I use a trememdous amout of groundwork to establish that a walk transistion (or halt for that matter) comes from my voice, which I feel is the most accurate aid you can have. Riders can use the wrong amout of leg, or too much hand, or lean forward when they mean to stretch up....but nobody says "haul ass" when they mean "whoa".

                        I teach re-schools or youngstock that when I say "whoa" and take a huge breath, we relax into a downward. It starts with hand walking, moves into on the lunge line and ground driving, and then into the saddle. So I don't even need the hand that much from the start, and the horse learns to regulate pace/transistions from my body language. And then I start to back off and allow them to hold pace on their own. (the beginnings of stabilization!)
                        www.englishivyfarms.com
                        Hunters, Jumpers, & Welsh Ponies
                        All I pay my psychiatrist is the cost of feed and hay, and he'll listen to me any day. ~Author Unknown

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          I've come late to this, and need to go carve the mud off my terra cotta covered Dutchman to make a lesson...

                          I'm surprised at the folks that don't understand self carriage and stabilization.

                          As englishivy says, it is a very old method. Littauer explains it well in his book, Schooling Your Horse.

                          The Old Dead Cavalry Guys still have it right after all these years.

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            Hmmmm... While I recognize that many confuse rushing with "forward", that doesn't seem to be this particular horse's problem. Again -- based on pictures I've seen of OTHER horses, I'm not going to question Ms. Kenan's methods TOO much. And I get the idea of stabilization.

                            But, for me, if the horse isn't pushing off his hind end, it's all for naught. I don't believe all the slow work in the world will develop the horse's strength (and topline) if there isn't enough forward thrust to get the back up.

                            It sounds like there is much more to this trainer's credentials and knowledge than what I see in this video. So perhaps it would be a more successful ad if she showed the same horse in her system 3 months later. What I see in this one video does not impress me.

                            Comment


                            • #74
                              rileyt,
                              I don't know where you got the idea, that Ann did not want the horse to use his hind end, that's exactly what she does want, the horse tracking up from behind going, round moving through himself for self carriage, not using the reins to carry him.
                              The slow part, the way I think of it, is the same idea as when a person lifts weights, you are supposed to go slow for max effect.
                              http://community.webshots.com/user/summitspringsfarm

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                To me this is just another tool for the training tool box which should be large enough to include many techniques.

                                I find it easiest for the horse to start on the ground by first making sure the horse can: lift his back and withers, arch his neck and tuck his pelvis. If the horse cannot do these things without a rider it silly, to me, to try to get them under saddle.

                                I include TTEAM ground driving which teaches the horse to correctly shift his balance to his hindquarters from a signal on the chest. Then I use leading and lunging exercises with a low head (I do not own side reins.) This encourages the horse to lengthen his top line.

                                Since I am often reschooling OTTBs I usually have much work to do on re-educating their mouths so I use a balance rein around the base of the neck which serves to rebalance them and slow them while lengthening the top line. I'll use a hackamore or side pull frequently in the beginning which eliminates incorrect responses to the bit until I have the rest of the body where I want it then I will go back to the bit. I do different things with different horses and don't rely on one technique.

                                Teaching the horse to stretch into contact, to me, is most effective in lengthening the top line. Lateral work then increases strength and carrying ability.

                                I have used the technique shown in the video (I call it half trot and half walk) with some horses but this often comes well after the other work. I use these to help relax and soften some horses and to get them what I call, "drapy." I may alternate this with more forward and forward and down. By "down" I mean into contact with a connection all the way "through."

                                Like I said, it is just one technique and a good trainer should have many.

                                Comment


                                • #76
                                  It is honestly getting a little depressing to read all of this extensive debate and analysis as if the ability to ride a horse in a controlled and relaxed manner in the very most preliminary state of carriage is some sort of revolutionary never-before-seen skill.

                                  But I guess on a forum where dressage is regularly dismissed as being detrimental to hunters, not surprising.
                                  The Noodlehttp://tiny.cc/NGKmT&http://tiny.cc/gioSA
                                  Jinxyhttp://tiny.cc/PIC798&http://tiny.cc/jinx364
                                  Boy Wonderhttp://tiny.cc/G9290
                                  The Hana is nuts! NUTS!!http://tinyurl.com/SOCRAZY

                                  Comment


                                  • #77
                                    Originally posted by meupatdoes View Post
                                    It is honestly getting a little depressing to read all of this extensive debate and analysis as if the ability to ride a horse in a controlled and relaxed manner in the very most preliminary state of carriage is some sort of revolutionary never-before-seen skill.

                                    But I guess on a forum where dressage is regularly dismissed as being detrimental to hunters, not surprising.
                                    Well, I agree that it is depressing.....but it is not from this discussion. It is depressing seeing horses inverted and incorrect, not just at a local level, but at all levels of showing. Some of them even have high price tags. Usually, the owners don't have a clue; sometimes the trainers don't have a clue!

                                    I don't find this discussion depressing at all. I find it great that many people are asking about, and trying to understand, a training concept that produces correct horses of quality. It makes for better riders and better horses.

                                    We constantly complain that the next generation of riders lack the skills, and we as a nation lack the horse flesh, to be serious international competitiors. But if we don't take the time to discuss how to do it, how are they to ever learn?
                                    www.englishivyfarms.com
                                    Hunters, Jumpers, & Welsh Ponies
                                    All I pay my psychiatrist is the cost of feed and hay, and he'll listen to me any day. ~Author Unknown

                                    Comment


                                    • #78
                                      Originally posted by englishivy View Post
                                      Well, I agree that it is depressing.....but it is not from this discussion. It is depressing seeing horses inverted and incorrect, not just at a local level, but at all levels of showing. Some of them even have high price tags. Usually, the owners don't have a clue; sometimes the trainers don't have a clue!

                                      I don't find this discussion depressing at all. I find it great that many people are asking about, and trying to understand, a training concept that produces correct horses of quality. It makes for better riders and better horses.

                                      We constantly complain that the next generation of riders lack the skills, and we as a nation lack the horse flesh, to be serious international competitiors. But if we don't take the time to discuss how to do it, how are they to ever learn?
                                      Well, a commitment to regular dressage lessons would go quite a long way to clearing up the big mystery. It is not a lost art or revolutionary exhalted skill that only lives on in rare trainers and is barely ever taught anymore, it is right across the road in the dressage barn nearest you. Riders who want to learn it will go find a dressage trainer to teach it to them if for whatever reason their hunter trainer (who should probably be re-evaluated if this is the case) can't or won't teach them.

                                      I agree with you that what is out there sometimes -especially the ignorance of paid professionals- can be infuriating.
                                      Last edited by meupatdoes; Jan. 14, 2012, 01:50 AM.
                                      The Noodlehttp://tiny.cc/NGKmT&http://tiny.cc/gioSA
                                      Jinxyhttp://tiny.cc/PIC798&http://tiny.cc/jinx364
                                      Boy Wonderhttp://tiny.cc/G9290
                                      The Hana is nuts! NUTS!!http://tinyurl.com/SOCRAZY

                                      Comment


                                      • #79
                                        It does not help the horses any that all anyone wants to do is jump, jump, jump. It's the culture at my barn. I wish it were possible to explain the beauty of riding a horse that is connected back to front, or the thrill of feeling that the horse is giving you his back, but that is really boring stuff to most people, and it's a shame.
                                        2012 goal: learn to ride like a Barn Rat

                                        A helmet saved my life.

                                        Comment


                                        • #80
                                          Oh I disagree that dressage lessons are right across the street from you! Their are what they think is dressage but from what I've seen around here not so much.
                                          Case in point a was asked to get on a dressage horse by a lady I really didn't know well and her horse had no idea what leg was and he was 8 years old.
                                          I think the problem is people don't realize that it's a process, they think they can get on a horse,kick him up into the bit,and viola your have a horse who accepts the bit carried himself and is back to front. That is a forced frame,IMHO.
                                          If you do the slow work, build up the muscles you can move into a horse who is capable of carrying you,round and is on contact, but it takes time, not forced every ride until he works up the muscles that way and goes around disengaged because the muscles you developed were done so through a short muscle frame work, not long and slow.imho
                                          http://community.webshots.com/user/summitspringsfarm

                                          Comment

                                          Working...
                                          X