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Rearing 2 1/2 year old

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  • Rearing 2 1/2 year old

    I have been working with a 2 1/2 year old gelding who has definitely had an attitude the whole time we have been working together but nothing danergous or alarming. We actually have made some progress and hes been going great and couldnt be happier. Every now and then he will refuse to move forward and dig his feet into the ground and will not go forward sometimes he will even throw a hop ( or a mini rear) in but nothing scary at all. Today and yesterday he has decided to start rearing and I am not talking a small rear, I am talking grab neck and pray.
    I get after him as soon as his feet hit the ground but now (last two rides) I feel like hes rearing to get out of working but its a bit dangerous. I do have his full sister who was stubborn like him but never reared. Need suggestions thanks in advance.

  • #2
    I would send him off to a trainer or try having someone on the ground snap a lunge wip when he goes up. Another thing is carry a water ballon in your coat pocket and hit him on top of the head with it when he rears. Sorry I don't have more ideas.

    Maybe he is too young? Maybe just do lunge work?

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #3
      I am a trainer and I wouldnt want someone sending me a rearing horse, not saying I am not willing to have someone come in and work with him, he is not to young he has not pulled this rearing bit at all and now some how in the last two rides he has decided that this is something new for him to try out on me

      Comment


      • #4
        I'd do ground work working on forwardness when asked etc. He's probably rearing out of confusion or some kind of gap in his training which isn't a quick fix.. go back to basics and through all of the steps in his training again. If he has been taught everything correctly things will progress quickly.. if not, hopefully you find where you have skipped something or something he doesn't fully understand and you can get it resolved.

        Comment


        • #5
          The hop was your warning that this was coming. You need to catch him before he goes up, not after. That means turn head to your knee, spin him, then kick forward. Repeat. They cannot go up if you catch it at the right time. You can work on the lunge too, and help just by instilling forward on the line before you get on.
          I am a trainer and I wouldnt want someone sending me a rearing horse
          Heh. Unfortunately people tend not to mention it beforehand. Consider this good practice for the future.

          Comment


          • #6
            I don't really believe in the water ballon/egg/etc over the head. Never seen it work and it takes a lot of balance and timing by the rider. I would get on with a dressage whip and the minute he starts to stop give him several good whacks behind the saddle. Horses usually respect a dressage whip he is more likely to jump forward rather than go up.

            Comment


            • #7
              I've come across rearing where pain is involved, particularly in the mouth. Are teeth changing, and there is pain? Especially in a horse that young, I'd be looking at every possibility of pain first, then attitude second. Just my humble opinion, hope this can be figured out!
              A rearing horse is never a safe horse to be riding, no matter the level of the rider.
              All that is gold does not glitter;
              Not all those who wander are lost.
              ~J.R.R. Tolkien
              http://theimperfectperfecthorse.blogspot.com/

              Comment

              • Original Poster

                #8
                Agree I usually will deal with alot but rearing I am not so into..... My vet is always out at the farm so I can have him look at him to see if it is physical but in my gut I know he is just being a punk, I introduced the dressage whip for the first time on Tuesday but just to help him moving forward, although he reared a few times yesterday they weren't all that bad today was more like women I am going to get rid of you so leave me alone! ...... I had my groom come in and get behind him (no whip just his voice) and that seemed to work but I will have my vet look him over and try some of the advice given, thanks!

                Comment


                • #9
                  2 1/2 is very, very young to be under saddle. However its not my horse and I understand that people have different ways of doing things. Have you have been having others ride the horse? Horses can learn to rear from a heavy handed rider, possibly someone that exercises the horse is contributing to. I am not poking at anyone's riding skills, but if it is causing the problem it is a plain fact that needs to be taken care of in some way.

                  Its hard to get out of them once they start, my mare almost never rears now. I bought her with the problem as she was the only A show level horse I could afford. It took two years of work and understanding how her little pea brain works. She will do it on the ground and under saddle from time to time, I would never let anyone other than myself ride her.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'm with englishcowgirl. Why are you riding him at that age to begin with? Chances are he was physically not ready and you have unknowingly overcharged him. Now there is the drama that you can't back off without giving him an 'I've got the better' experience V. bad situation.
                    I think I would go back to ground working only for a while to work through the rearing up thing, then throw him in a field to mature so he will hopefully forget about everything that happened before. Then completely restart at a more appropriate age.
                    Sorry but I don't think it's a generally good idea to be on a 2.5yo on a regular basis. It's one thing to sit on them for a few times and walk them around just so they get used to the idea of carrying a rider. But working them with a rider on is something I wouldn't advocate during the 2yo year at all.
                    There is almost no breed that is physically developed enough to do work with a rider on in their 2yo year. The fact that racehorses are running at this age doesn't make it acceptable to me either.
                    Froh zu sein bedarf es wenig...
                    http://www.germanhorseconnection.com
                    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Germa...m/237648984580

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I'm with English & Kareen too... too young and he's telling you so. Listen.

                      Ground driving is fine and recommended. Give him more time to finish growing up, both physically & mentally.
                      <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- Being negative only makes a difficult journey more difficult. You may be given a cactus, but you don't have to sit on it.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by ChocoMare View Post
                        I'm with English & Kareen too... too young and he's telling you so. Listen.

                        Ground driving is fine and recommended. Give him more time to finish growing up, both physically & mentally.
                        Fourth that. I know rearers who were older, and there are certainly ways to deal with them, but they were just being nasty; it sounds like your boy is just being 2 and a half and trying to tell you he needs to grow up a wee bit more.
                        Trying a life outside of FEI tents and hotel rooms.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by CBoylen View Post
                          The hop was your warning that this was coming. You need to catch him before he goes up, not after. That means turn head to your knee, spin him, then kick forward. Repeat. They cannot go up if you catch it at the right time. You can work on the lunge too, and help just by instilling forward on the line before you get on.
                          Yup, exactly this. I have had a few bratty three olds try to rear. If addressed correctly and quickly, they won't get their feet off the ground and won't keep trying (unless they are rearing in response to pain).

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by CBoylen View Post
                            The hop was your warning that this was coming. You need to catch him before he goes up, not after. That means turn head to your knee, spin him, then kick forward. Repeat. They cannot go up if you catch it at the right time. You can work on the lunge too, and help just by instilling forward on the line before you get on.

                            Heh. Unfortunately people tend not to mention it beforehand. Consider this good practice for the future.
                            Yes, this EXACTLY. I have a 6 year old who was a rearing freak between ages 3-4. And, yeah, not little hops...straight up. The key is to catch them the instant right before they go up, spin them like little tops with their noses literally to your knee, and then immediately trot or canter off very FORWARD. The timing is really important. If you don't catch them before the front feet are off the ground, you actually risk them falling.

                            I am really good at catching my horse now right before a rear starts (which is almost never these days). He has reared I think exactly twice as a 5-6 year old (as opposed to every day as a 3-4 year old), and both times could have been prevented if I was paying more attention. It's his fresh "OMG, I am so EXCITED" standby response. For what it is worth, I really trust this horse now and don't ever feel unsafe riding him. So I do think it is something that they can get over, although I think the propensity towards it is always there.

                            Also, please don't try some of the things some others have suggested. Several of them are just dangerous. Cracking a lunge whip when the horse rears? I am positive my horse would have flipped over if someone had ever done this during one of his rears. Water balloon? No way to coordinate, and in the case of a defiant or fresh rear out of a young horse, more likely to further incite them than fix anything.

                            And, I will just state for the record that I do think 2 1/2 is a bit young for a horse to be in work beyond perhaps being saddled up and going for short walks, etc. If the horse is in substantial work at this age (walk, trot, canter), which it kind of sounds like he might be, I think it is too much. This could be contributing to the rearing issue, whether you would like to think so or not.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by keepthelegend View Post
                              I don't really believe in the water ballon/egg/etc over the head. Never seen it work and it takes a lot of balance and timing by the rider. I would get on with a dressage whip and the minute he starts to stop give him several good whacks behind the saddle. Horses usually respect a dressage whip he is more likely to jump forward rather than go up.
                              Just speaking from my own experience here, this would (and did) cause my horse to rear more and higher. The spinning really, really, really is the only way to go.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by GingerJumper View Post
                                Fourth that. I know rearers who were older, and there are certainly ways to deal with them, but they were just being nasty; it sounds like your boy is just being 2 and a half and trying to tell you he needs to grow up a wee bit more.
                                Yup. Baby is letting you know that this is too much for his wee brain/body at this time. Go back to ground driving, leadline manners, turnout as much as possible and try again next year.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  In my experience rearing typically comes from Thoracic discomfort, I have worked on several training horses sent to me with "rearing" problems, only 10% of the time was this strictly a defiance issue. It is quite common for a young horse to have spinal issues when ridden at a younger age. Consider that the spine at this age is much like a suspension bridge, as he grows and matures in some places and not others he goes through several awkward periods making it hard to know how to carry himself, therefore creating tension and in most cases pain issues.
                                  If this were my horse I would go back to ground work until I feel the problem is in hand and then give this horse a few months off to grow. I do not take horses into under saddle training until their 3 year old winters so that they can go home as started 4 year olds and take a few months off to grow and let the muscles "come back" as first time training tends to build some of the wrong muscles due to confusion. I like to have a cleaner slate when bringing my horse into complete work later on when they are done growing.

                                  I agree completely with the earlier poster that said that said that the hop was a warning, the rear has developed to a dangerous degree. If this horse were older I would do a lot of exercises on the flat sorting the horses hock and feeling the topline so that when I feel he is going to stop or get sticky I can ride the hind end forward and through, if I am too late, turning the horses head and then pushing through is great as long as the horse can balance and this doesnt lead to falling... something I would worry about in riding a horse so young.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    When I got one of my younger horses, he had barely been started and he would pretty much do the same thing when asked to go forward, stop and rear. He was 3.5 at the time and my thought process was either he is being a shit or he doesn't understand what I want. Considering his age and experience (or lack of) I decided he had a bit of an attitude but mostly had no idea what I wanted so I went back to ground work for a couple of months to fill those gaps in his training. When I got back on, he was much much better and happier. There was still the occasional rear for the next month but then I would put his face to my knee and kick him side ways then send him forward as some other posters have said and I haven't had to do that for almost a year now.

                                    Your horse is probably confused and as other people have said, he might be uncomfortable considering the age. You should go back to ground work for awhile and let the horse grow up and understand what you want. There is no really no good reason to be on his back right now.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      He is not too young, he has a 'tude , doesn't want to work and has discovered this resistance. The way to avoid rearing is MAKE THEM KEEP GOING FORWARD, at whatever pace you can manage. They can't rear if they are going forward. This will mean many sessions where not much training goes on, just FORWARD.

                                      We specialize in helping difficult/problem horses and have a GREAT rider to deal with it, if you get to the point of needing help.
                                      Laurie

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        I have seen rearing caused by ulcers. Treated the ulcers, end of problem.

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