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" Junior superstars" article in COTH- is it just me or

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    #41
    Originally posted by Big_Grey_hunter View Post
    Sour grapes much? I hate these "I'm better because I don't have money" posts.

    I'd eat as many sour grapes as you gave me if you gave me some money too. I wish I had some money! damn horses take all my money....
    Stoneybrook Farm Afton TN

    Comment


      #42
      But I would say that working throughout middle and high school and slaving away for another four years at college so that I could graduate with honors and winning both of my division/major awards and spending what little money I made taking care of drunk kids and managing other RAs on books and supplies for four years is different than someone bragging about something they've 'worked hard at' for a couple years and managed to get to the top based on someone else' networking and money alone.

      It's a magazine about equestrian sport, and probably the Junior Issue where they feature top junior riders. The article wasn't in the New York Times or Education Today. Of course the COTH is going to have an article about successful riders, just like Running Times writes about successful runners.

      They must have had some talent as there are a lot of wealthy, well connected kids riding that they compete with.

      I don't read the COTH to hear about a hardworking college student (unless it is an IHSA article). I read it to hear about horsepeople. So while, yes, it is sad that good students don't get enough press, it is not really a topic for a horse magazine.

      And some of those 11 year olds have some talent- especially the ones making up green ponies.

      Comment

        Original Poster

        #43
        Originally posted by tidy rabbit View Post
        I'd eat as many sour grapes as you gave me if you gave me some money too. I wish I had some money! damn horses take all my money....
        Heeheeeheee tidy rabbit- me too.
        " It's about the horse, and that's it."
        George Morris

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          #44
          Originally posted by Midge View Post
          Tori Colvin is a freak of nature with a natural talent the rest of us should hope to have in our fingernail filings. Hell, half the time I think Tori rides better than Scott. I wouldn't recognize her without her helmet, so it's not like we are best buds, but it would be nice if people who don't know what they are talking about could grasp that maybe, just maybe, it's not all money.

          Think about it. Almost everyone showing regularly at A shows has to have money or money behind them, or making an enormous sacrifice to have a shot. When a couple kids rise to the top, over and over again, it isn't because they are richer. It's because they are better.
          Oh shush with your logic! Surely these people don't beat me because I suck more than them?!? Say it ain't so!

          You think half the time, huh? I think you are selling her short.
          Your crazy is showing. You might want to tuck that back in.

          Comment


            #45
            Originally posted by DMK View Post
            Oh shush with your logic!
            Midge can be so annoying that way.

            Comment


              #46
              Originally posted by MIKES MCS View Post
              11 Year olds do not ACHIEVE success, success is bought for them, perhaps that is where the resentment comes from, You know from those adults who have scrimped, saved, starved, spent 18 hour days in the barn, rode everything under the sun and moon, made the SUCCESFUL transition from ponies to say at least a horse. Ponies are not exactly a sport where actual talent and skill is needed to win. Other wise why would so many pay so much for those tiny little packers who can take a Joke so gracefully. Now if you put that same 11 year old in the jumper ring and it can clock around on a undrugged, unbroken, athletic horse, I'll agree that's success.
              See article. Tori Colvin, age 13 (ok, so not 11) won her first grand prix. She beat Margie Engle. That's not achieving success????

              http://www.sidelinesnews.com/wp/week...es-it-all.html

              Why are some people so quick to discredit these kids? Just because they're young?
              ~ Citizens for a Kinder, Gentler COTH...our mantra: Be nice. ~

              Comment


                #47
                Originally posted by Midge View Post
                Think about it. Almost everyone showing regularly at A shows has to have money or money behind them, or making an enormous sacrifice to have a shot. When a couple kids rise to the top, over and over again, it isn't because they are richer. It's because they are better.
                An excellent point.
                "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

                ...just settin' on the Group W bench.

                Comment


                  #48
                  All the money in the world and all the packer ponies would not have made me the rider some of these girls are. I love horses, but am not as driven as you need to be to excell, and not as naturally athletic or brave either (and I wasn't as a kid). I am a good rider and admire great riders, but I give credit where credit is due, and anyone who can consistantly ride well at the A level is there on their own merits. Yes, the money helps to get and keep them there, but there are countless others who give up or ride the lower levels.

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                    #49
                    Originally posted by tja789 View Post
                    Perhaps threads about junior riding superstars bring claws out because many posters seem eager to heap praise upon these children because of their "drive and talent". But drive and talent are rather common. For every little riding superstar on the AA circuit, there are a 1000 girls who have tons of riding talent and work their butts off to ride at all. They would give anything for the opportunities the little riding stars are given. The achievements of children in the horse show world are entirely dependent on a team of adults making it happen for the kid. This can mean having very wealthy parents or parents who are horse professionals or parents who otherwise make sure the kid is always where they need to be to ensure success at horse shows. Adults make things happen for kids in expensive sports like riding. Granted the kids who become stars have sufficient drive and talent to take advantage of the opportunity they are offered. But it's the opportunity that's rare and special, not the kids themselves.

                    While there's no reason to dislike or insult little horse show stars, excessive praise and admiration don't seem warranted either. They're not necessarily more talented or dedicated than most other aspiring young riders, just vastly better supported.
                    I would agree with this for the most part. There is no doubt that those kids are quite talented and have worked hard but it ultimately comes down to the adults involved who have sacrificed time and money to take their kids to the top and the professionals who have chosen to help along these fine riders.

                    It takes so much to become a top rider- talent, hard work, money (from someone), opportunities to ride talented horses, etc. Very rarely (if ever), does a top rider make it to the top on their own accord.

                    But I do appreciate COTH running these articles. It is always interesting to learn more about any rider, young or old, who is doing well. When I was young, I LOVED reading this type of article. Honestly, reading about other people's successes helped push me to be successful (and ultimately become a professional). I figured if they can do it then so can I!

                    Comment


                      #50
                      Originally posted by snaffle635 View Post
                      See article. Tori Colvin, age 13 (ok, so not 11) won her first grand prix. She beat Margie Engle. That's not achieving success????

                      http://www.sidelinesnews.com/wp/week...es-it-all.html

                      Why are some people so quick to discredit these kids? Just because they're young?
                      Another girl that has really come along is Lucy Davis- she kicked some MAJOR butt in the Grand Prix classes this winter.

                      Comment


                        #51
                        Originally posted by magnolia73 View Post
                        It's a magazine about equestrian sport, and probably the Junior Issue where they feature top junior riders. The article wasn't in the New York Times or Education Today. Of course the COTH is going to have an article about successful riders, just like Running Times writes about successful runners.

                        They must have had some talent as there are a lot of wealthy, well connected kids riding that they compete with.

                        I don't read the COTH to hear about a hardworking college student (unless it is an IHSA article). I read it to hear about horsepeople. So while, yes, it is sad that good students don't get enough press, it is not really a topic for a horse magazine.

                        And some of those 11 year olds have some talent- especially the ones making up green ponies.

                        Well said!

                        Comment


                          #52
                          Originally posted by Trixie View Post
                          What a perfect example of an adult acting like a jealous child.

                          We're not talking about pony kids, here. And plenty of pony kids work as hard as any adult.



                          And why do you think that is, exactly?


                          I would venture it's generally because they're um, more talented and dedicated than many other aspiring young riders.
                          Nonsense. Talent and dedication, even huge amounts, don't magically get a young child riding instruction at an early age and access to top trainers, ponies, and AA circuit horse shows with all of the assorted arrangements and costs involved. Adults make all of this happen and the more opportunities they provide, the more kids can accomplish.

                          The kids in the story are succeeding at the national level because of their favorable family circumstances, combined with talent and dedication. Implying that their success is solely due to their superior talent and dedication is such an unfair put down to thousands of other kids who ride fantastically and work just as hard. But no one ever hears or cares about them because family support maxes out at the local show or 4-H level.

                          It's fine that life isn't fair. No pity party needed. Just see things clearly and call a spade a spade.

                          Comment


                            #53
                            Originally posted by tja789 View Post
                            Implying that their success is solely due to their superior talent and dedication is such an unfair put down to thousands of other kids who ride fantastically and work just as hard.
                            No one is saying that wealthy kids have superior talent and dedication to those of more modest means. But implying that they only got where they did due to money is equally untrue. As someone already mentioned, all the money in the world wouldn't allow most of us to accomplish what Tori, Reed and Taylor Ann have in their young careers. And what parent isn't going to buy their children the best horses, and instruction they can afford? I suppose Bruce Springsteen should buy his daughter lousy horses to make everyone else feel better? Life is unfair, but COTH's junior issue is showcasing some exceptional young riders.

                            Did anyone actually read Tori's responses? The kid has an absolute passion for the sport, her favorite horse show is "every horse show", she doesn't take vacations, she rides all day long every day. And she's only 13 years old.

                            Comment


                              #54
                              Look the Chronicle is a magazine that caters to the horseshow world...... so the kids won at that game....

                              . Now if you put that same 11 year old in the jumper ring and it can clock around on a undrugged, unbroken, athletic horse, I'll agree that's success.
                              I'd call it a Disney movie if the kid lived and won, and a local show if the kid merely survived.

                              At 13, the child did a Grand Prix. At 37, I can barely jump a crossrail course. I'm impressed. She rode 11 ponies, that is impressive. She made up some ponies.

                              Does she deserve the cover of Life Magazine or Sports Illustrated, no. But if we define success as a junior rider as winning a lot at the biggest shows, on a number of horses across two disciplines and multiple divsions, than I think it reasonable for the publication that reports on these shows to have an article about her.

                              There probably are harder working riders, but it hardly sounds like she sits around filing her nails and texting while mumsy holds her show coat and Rico brings up the next pre-programmed pony.

                              I get SO SICK of adults being mean about kids who won the family lottery. What would make you happy? If they took a vow of poverty? The young rider at my barn with the fancy junior horse appparently did a missionary trip to Africa.... can we please not classify her as a spoiled brat? Or maybe the gal at my barn who shows junior jumpers who pretty much manages her own barn and horses- can we give her the benefit of the doubt that she rides because she loves it? Or the kid making up a project pony to fund her next purchase- can we give her credit for being a good rider?

                              Thanks.

                              Comment


                                #55
                                Originally posted by tja789 View Post
                                Nonsense. Talent and dedication, even huge amounts, don't magically get a young child riding instruction at an early age and access to top trainers, ponies, and AA circuit horse shows with all of the assorted arrangements and costs involved. Adults make all of this happen and the more opportunities they provide, the more kids can accomplish.

                                The kids in the story are succeeding at the national level because of their favorable family circumstances, combined with talent and dedication. Implying that their success is solely due to their superior talent and dedication is such an unfair put down to thousands of other kids who ride fantastically and work just as hard. But no one ever hears or cares about them because family support maxes out at the local show or 4-H level.
                                I still venture that any child who is jumping at the Grand Prix level at that age IS more talented or dedicated than most other aspiring young riders. That absolutely takes talent and dedication, regardless of how much family and support they have. To fail to acknowledge does a disservice to what they have accomplished, since most of us grown-up adults couldn't even start to jump those fences.

                                You know what one of my favorite things about riding is? It takes an awfully long time to completely age out of it. So even if some child doesn't have any support system and can't network herself adequately, there's still time and opportunity for success once he is she is grown. But even still, most of us aren't jumping the big sticks.
                                ---
                                They're small hearts.

                                Comment


                                  #56
                                  Okay, can we all agree it takes money and talent to get where these kids are? Plus a LOT of hard work and sacrifice. It all goes hand in hand.
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                                    #57
                                    COTH should thank you

                                    I just subscribed for the sake of being able to read this article. I wonder if there will be many other new subscribers due to this thread...

                                    Comment


                                      #58
                                      Originally posted by comingback View Post
                                      I just subscribed for the sake of being able to read this article. I wonder if there will be many other new subscribers due to this thread...
                                      Many? Not likely. Quite a few folks are probably getting their copy/paste on and discussing it in private.
                                      Thus do we growl that our big toes have, at this moment, been thrown up from below!

                                      Comment


                                        #59
                                        Originally posted by Trixie View Post

                                        You know what one of my favorite things about riding is? It takes an awfully long time to completely age out of it. So even if some child doesn't have any support system and can't network herself adequately, there's still time and opportunity for success once he is she is grown. But even still, most of us aren't jumping the big sticks.
                                        Yes, that is absolutely something I love about riding. You definitely don't need a stellar jr career to be a top adult rider, although it may help. Not to mention many of these jr riders will decide to pursue a career outside of the horse industry, which sometimes opens doors for other up and comers to shine.

                                        Comment


                                          #60
                                          I subscribe (have for 30+ years) and read the article/profiles and thought it was well done, except for the use of "superstars" in the title and the fact that IMO the real superstars of our sport are the horses.

                                          Fact is, there is no denying that there is a huge difference between a great child rider on a great and expensive, made horse and say a great child gymnast, ice skater, tennis player, etc. that have only their individual talents to rely on. Actually same with adult riders and other athletes.

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