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" Junior superstars" article in COTH- is it just me or

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    #21
    Originally posted by horsegal301 View Post
    No offense, but I think there's a huge difference between a top student and a top rider. ...But also, I have not read the article, but just a little blip of what I think...
    I think you should read the article.
    madeline
    * What you release is what you teach * Don't be distracted by unwanted behavior* Whoever waits the longest is the teacher. Van Hargis

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      #22
      I read it. I thought the kids all seemed very dedicated. They didn't seem full of themselves and sounded very happy for all they have been offered. The name of one of them (cannot remember her name - sorry!) said she would like to open up a horse rescue. How many top junior riders would say that? I think that is wonderful.

      Maybe some of the kids were just trying to act humble, I don't know. All I know is that all those riders are great riders. Yes, they (might, I don't know) have money. But reading what they said, it sounded like they worked very hard to get where they were.

      Comment


        #23
        Originally posted by SWL9 View Post
        The "junior superstars" interviewed were Reed Kessler, Victoria Colvin and Taylor Ann Adams, none of which seemed to be particularly "pretentious". They are all incredibly talented riders and should be proud of their accomplishments,
        I am not sure about the others but Tori Colvin is from an ordinary, middle class background, her father is a farrier and I believe her mother is a teaching pro. It is her talent and work ethic that got her noticed by Scott Stewart, and she works her butt off for her success.

        I don't know about the rest of you, but I would have been thrilled to have had 6 ponies when I was 11 years old, with or without a groom and tutor, and if you're honest with yourselves, most of you would have probably felt the same way.

        In the same issue (I think) is coverage of our junior and young rider teams European tour, where Reed Kessler rode a double clear to clinch the win for the US team, and Jessica Springsteen's beautiful riding was complimented by Willie Melliger, chef d'equipe of the Swiss team. All of these kids, regardless of their financial status, are talented and hard working and don't deserve your criticism because you are jealous of their wealth.

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          #24
          Originally posted by PonyPuzzle View Post
          I'm sorry I suggested it.
          How is a screen shot different than a scanned in copy though? I have seen scanned in copies on this BB before. In any case, I didn't know the idea would frowned upon and I didn't mean to upset anyone.
          I'm sure you didn't mean to create a problem. The point is that some of us pay to subscribe to COTH, so its in poor taste to post something (whether scanned or screen shot) for others who haven't paid for it, especially as this forum is provided free by the Chronicle magazine.

          Comment


            #25
            No offense, but I think there's a huge difference between a top student and a top rider. One requires money and assets and a little bit of hard work doing something that one should enjoy.
            I was comparing the worship my brother received as a highschool football player not as a top student. He was a big guy who could plow through a defensive line.... We were both good students, that got less recognition than football or riding. God knows good students are never celebrated.

            Comment


              #26
              I haven't read the article. But I do know that whenever something is written about any "junior superstar" the claws come out on here and the fur starts to fly. It's a shame.

              I don't do much with the hunters anymore but even I've heard of these kids so they must be doing something right. They may have money, they may not. At the end of the day they still have to ride the ponies/horses and turn in the trips to get the ribbons.

              I have seen kids who have been handed well trained horses who can't get the performance out of them. The buttons may be there but the rider has to know how to push them.

              Good for these kids - I hope they can continue to shine as they age out, if that is what the choose.

              BAC - great post. Thanks for the background info.

              Comment


                #27
                Originally posted by BAC View Post
                I am not sure about the others but Tori Colvin is from an ordinary, middle class background, her father is a farrier and I believe her mother is a teaching pro. It is her talent and work ethic that got her noticed by Scott Stewart, and she works her butt off for her success.

                I don't know about the rest of you, but I would have been thrilled to have had 6 ponies when I was 11 years old, with or without a groom and tutor, and if you're honest with yourselves, most of you would have probably felt the same way.

                In the same issue (I think) is coverage of our junior and young rider teams European tour, where Reed Kessler rode a double clear to clinch the win for the US team, and Jessica Springsteen's beautiful riding was complimented by Willie Melliger, chef d'equipe of the Swiss team. All of these kids, regardless of their financial status, are talented and hard working and don't deserve your criticism because you are jealous of their wealth.
                "Go on, Bill this is no place for a pony."

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                  #28
                  Originally posted by PonyPuzzle View Post
                  I'm sorry I suggested it.
                  How is a screen shot different than a scanned in copy though? I have seen scanned in copies on this BB before. In any case, I didn't know the idea would frowned upon and I didn't mean to upset anyone.
                  Screen-shot or scanned in, both are illegal under copyright laws.

                  Carry on . . .
                  EHJ | FB | #140 | watch | #insta

                  Comment


                    #29
                    Many people of all ages are given opportunities because they show drive and talent. Having seen all these girls at shows one time or another, they are not prima donnas. They seized a chance to grow in their sport. I have also seen girls given the chance to ride great horses and make no effort and disappear. We should be rewarding their success and effort and applauding the people who back them for giving them the opportunity to realize their dream. GO GIRLS!

                    Comment


                      #30
                      Tori Colvin is a freak of nature with a natural talent the rest of us should hope to have in our fingernail filings. Hell, half the time I think Tori rides better than Scott. I wouldn't recognize her without her helmet, so it's not like we are best buds, but it would be nice if people who don't know what they are talking about could grasp that maybe, just maybe, it's not all money.

                      Think about it. Almost everyone showing regularly at A shows has to have money or money behind them, or making an enormous sacrifice to have a shot. When a couple kids rise to the top, over and over again, it isn't because they are richer. It's because they are better.
                      *****
                      You will not rise to the occasion, you will default to your level of training.

                      Comment


                        #31
                        To me it seems like most of them [them being top junior riders] have terrible attitudes and think they are entitled to things (though it seems that way with the younger generation in general) just because mommy and daddy give it to them on command.
                        Where did you get that from? Do you know these children?

                        I'm with Midge. The ones that win, over and over again, especially through catch riding, are generally the ones that are really, really good.
                        ---
                        They're small hearts.

                        Comment


                          #32
                          Originally posted by horsegal301 View Post
                          No offense, but I think there's a huge difference between a top student and a top rider. One requires money and assets and a little bit of hard work doing something that one should enjoy. To me it seems like most of them [them being top junior riders] have terrible attitudes and think they are entitled to things (though it seems that way with the younger generation in general) just because mommy and daddy give it to them on command. Should they be given even more attention on top of what they already have in the industry? We should all know better by now that hometowns love to spew out things about football but would ignore everything else.

                          Minimal effort on the best money can buy is a little different than working with the cards you've been dealt and overcoming everything thrown your way and still making it to the top. You don't need to have money or connections, just the will power and work ethic to take it to the top - and you get there by yourself and the work you put into it... without paying for it and without things that other people shower upon you -- unless you're paying for a tutor. Everything is for yourself. I would think that's different from paying for the best rider and going to the best shows and riding and handing off the pony to a groom to do everything else for it.

                          Comparing riding to academics is comparing apples to avocados. I won't even get started on how different it is from being scouted for a sport and the effort and time that goes into shaping yourself into one of the best on hard work and natural born talent...

                          But also, I have not read the article, but just a little blip of what I think... and maybe it's because I was one of those kids who worked all throughout middle school and high school to be one of those top students. I didn't go to Harvard for sure, but then again, it didn't have my area of interest as a major... But I would say that working throughout middle and high school and slaving away for another four years at college so that I could graduate with honors and winning both of my division/major awards and spending what little money I made taking care of drunk kids and managing other RAs on books and supplies for four years is different than someone bragging about something they've 'worked hard at' for a couple years and managed to get to the top based on someone else' networking and money alone.
                          Sour grapes much? I hate these "I'm better because I don't have money" posts.
                          .

                          Comment


                            #33
                            Since this topic is degenerating in the usual way and Midge has made great point about talented catch-riders, I'm starting a new thread with a question for y'all.
                            The armchair saddler
                            Politically Pro-Cat

                            Comment


                              #34
                              You are not a top rider because you bought your way there sorry. Yes money could buy you a nice horse etc and yes some of the top riders do have money in their background. But I don't care how much money you have if you don't work hard or have the talent you will not be a top rider. Does having money help? Of course it does, but so does living in the right location and being noticed by the right people. Many of these kids work hard to be where they are. They work, ride a lot of horses, and still have to do their school work. I too hate the attitude that money=winning. No matter what hard work=winning.

                              I did not have a super nice horse and yes sometimes it sucked when we would do our best and still get beat just because he wasn't as fancy. But the people beating me still had to lay down nice rounds and when they didn't I would beat them. To lay down nice rounds on a regular basis you have to be good.
                              http://community.webshots.com/user/jenn52318

                              Comment

                                Original Poster

                                #35
                                Wow - I knew I'd regret the use of the word " pretentious" - wasn't the exact fit. Let me get out my Thesaurus and have another go at it. TeriK - successful kids is what I'm about - I've taught since I was 16yo, got my USPC A, and have taught all my life- nothing makes me happier than ANY kid succeeding, whether the success is mastering posting or completing a Medal course.MY kid rides exactly as much and at the level he chooses- his interests are now NJROTC and trying to get into West Point so no,my comment was not based on jealousy/"sour grapes".He has different goals.The article just gave me a vague uneasiness, and I can't put a finger on why. I'm trying to find that issue and reread the article to re-evaluate. Also, I live in a small Southern town, and the attention paid to High School football is ridiculous- PS. my you ngest son plays football, and I still hold that opinion!
                                " It's about the horse, and that's it."
                                George Morris

                                Comment


                                  #36
                                  Originally posted by TeriKessler View Post
                                  So do you just get upset reading about sucessful young riders, or do you dislike all sucessful young people? Are you enraged by top soccer players, actors, dancers and students? Is there an income limit for people's achievements to be considered legitimate by you? Like a cap for pro ball players? Please enlighten me, because I'm completely flumoxed by your disdain for kids who achieve any sucess. Oh wait, is it just OTHER people's kids' sucess that irritates you?
                                  11 Year olds do not ACHIEVE success, success is bought for them, perhaps that is where the resentment comes from, You know from those adults who have scrimped, saved, starved, spent 18 hour days in the barn, rode everything under the sun and moon, made the SUCCESFUL transition from ponies to say at least a horse. Ponies are not exactly a sport where actual talent and skill is needed to win. Other wise why would so many pay so much for those tiny little packers who can take a Joke so gracefully. Now if you put that same 11 year old in the jumper ring and it can clock around on a undrugged, unbroken, athletic horse, I'll agree that's success.

                                  Comment


                                    #37
                                    Originally posted by horsegal301 View Post
                                    No offense, but I think there's a huge difference between a top student and a top rider. One requires money and assets and a little bit of hard work doing something that one should enjoy. To me it seems like most of them [them being top junior riders] have terrible attitudes and think they are entitled to things (though it seems that way with the younger generation in general) just because mommy and daddy give it to them on command. Should they be given even more attention on top of what they already have in the industry? We should all know better by now that hometowns love to spew out things about football but would ignore everything else.

                                    Minimal effort on the best money can buy is a little different than working with the cards you've been dealt and overcoming everything thrown your way and still making it to the top. You don't need to have money or connections, just the will power and work ethic to take it to the top - and you get there by yourself and the work you put into it... without paying for it and without things that other people shower upon you -- unless you're paying for a tutor. Everything is for yourself. I would think that's different from paying for the best rider and going to the best shows and riding and handing off the pony to a groom to do everything else for it.

                                    Comparing riding to academics is comparing apples to avocados. I won't even get started on how different it is from being scouted for a sport and the effort and time that goes into shaping yourself into one of the best on hard work and natural born talent...

                                    But also, I have not read the article, but just a little blip of what I think... and maybe it's because I was one of those kids who worked all throughout middle school and high school to be one of those top students. I didn't go to Harvard for sure, but then again, it didn't have my area of interest as a major... But I would say that working throughout middle and high school and slaving away for another four years at college so that I could graduate with honors and winning both of my division/major awards and spending what little money I made taking care of drunk kids and managing other RAs on books and supplies for four years is different than someone bragging about something they've 'worked hard at' for a couple years and managed to get to the top based on someone else' networking and money alone.

                                    We're really impressed that you were on the honor roll in middle school. Less impressed that all that edumakation couldn't help you not write a gigantic runon sentence listing your academic accomplishments.

                                    I haven't read the article either, but it doesn't take a rocket scientist to guess that the young riders who are "bragging" about working hard have been riding since they were old enough to steer a horse. If that's not long enough for you, hold on and let them LIVE long enough to get more years in.

                                    Comment


                                      #38
                                      Agreed with Midge, Tori Colvin IS a freak of nature, that kid can ride better than most of the top pros in this country. And she works so hard, I saw her at WEF one year and she must of ridden close to 20 or 25 horses in one day! She is a machine! All 3 of these girls are talented riders and I am glad to see them getting some acknowledgement for working so hard. We all know it takes a lot of hard work and dedication to be at the top of this sport.

                                      Comment


                                        #39
                                        Perhaps threads about junior riding superstars bring claws out because many posters seem eager to heap praise upon these children because of their “drive and talent”. But drive and talent are rather common. For every little riding superstar on the AA circuit, there are a 1000 girls who have tons of riding talent and work their butts off to ride at all. They would give anything for the opportunities the little riding stars are given. The achievements of children in the horse show world are entirely dependent on a team of adults making it happen for the kid. This can mean having very wealthy parents or parents who are horse professionals or parents who otherwise make sure the kid is always where they need to be to ensure success at horse shows. Adults make things happen for kids in expensive sports like riding. Granted the kids who become stars have sufficient drive and talent to take advantage of the opportunity they are offered. But it’s the opportunity that’s rare and special, not the kids themselves.

                                        While there’s no reason to dislike or insult little horse show stars, excessive praise and admiration don’t seem warranted either. They’re not necessarily more talented or dedicated than most other aspiring young riders, just vastly better supported.

                                        Comment


                                          #40
                                          11 Year olds do not ACHIEVE success, success is bought for them, perhaps that is where the resentment comes from, You know from those adults who have scrimped, saved, starved, spent 18 hour days in the barn, rode everything under the sun and moon, made the SUCCESFUL transition from ponies to say at least a horse. Ponies are not exactly a sport where actual talent and skill is needed to win. Other wise why would so many pay so much for those tiny little packers who can take a Joke so gracefully. Now if you put that same 11 year old in the jumper ring and it can clock around on a undrugged, unbroken, athletic horse, I'll agree that's success.
                                          What a perfect example of an adult acting like a jealous child.

                                          We're not talking about pony kids, here. And plenty of pony kids work as hard as any adult.

                                          They’re not necessarily more talented or dedicated than most other aspiring young riders, just vastly better supported.
                                          And why do you think that is, exactly?

                                          I would venture it's generally because they're um, more talented and dedicated than many other aspiring young riders.
                                          ---
                                          They're small hearts.

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