• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

any one have any good no stirrup exercises?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • any one have any good no stirrup exercises?

    i really need to improve my lower leg and i was told the best way to do that was working with out stirrups. i have done so in the past i was just wondering if there were any good exercises out there or ways i could get it stronger the fastest. obviously consistancy but does anyone have any tips or suggestions?

  • #2
    Post. Post more. Post even more than that.

    Once posting isn't hard? Two point.


    Then go jump a course. Without reins.


    Basically, what you already do, but without stirrups. I like to time trot sets for posting trot until I build up to a longer time period. When I was best I was posting a total of 30 minutes a day without stirrups.
    Originally posted by Silverbridge
    If you get anything on your Facebook feed about who is going to the Olympics in 2012 or guessing the outcome of Bush v Gore please start threads about those, too.

    Comment


    • #3
      I often find that the best way to do it was to remove the stirrups from my saddle (so I'm not just crossing them) as that removes the temptation to take them back when you get tired. The first few days hurt, then that magically goes away. Go for it!

      Comment


      • #4
        I actually don't love no stirrups for myself unless I'm only planning to do sitting trot or canter. Posting without stirrups makes me grip too much with my knee, which kind of defeats the purpose of improving the lower leg, plus it tends to annoy my horse

        So for me, what I actually like to do is a lot of two point. And I mean A LOT. Do it at all gaits, with transitions, etc. It not only helps me get into my heel more, it helps me really wrap my leg around my horse and is a great core workout.

        The up-up-down or up-down-down exercise when posting (with irons) is another really good exercise to improve your balance and your leg. I'll do that one when I really feel like torturing myself.

        Comment


        • #5
          Up two, down two and other variations of posting exercises (up two, down one, or up one, down two, etc.).

          Two point. And I like to do two point down the rail and then sitting trot in the corners/circles.

          Posting the canter.

          But really, just general no-stirrup riding is the ticket. I pulled my stirrups off of my mare's saddle in September and haven't ridden with them since. It's made a huge difference in my position and stability on my other horses. But you have to pay attention to HOW you're riding without stirrups. No-stirrup work should never cause you to pinch with your knee (in which case you're allowing yourself to do it incorrectly), and *should* help to strengthen your entire leg. You should have equal pressure from ankle to thigh and you should pay attention to whether your legs are equal and even (I initially dropped my stirrups because I was keeping one leg too far forward relative to the other).

          With that being said, I think there's a better exercise for strengthening and stabilizing your lower leg. If you really want to torture yourself, I suggest standing straight up in the stirrups during your warmup. It's the absolute best balance and leg-strengthening exercise and doesn't cause you to grip with your knee or risk harming your position in any way. It forces you to be rock solid with your base, and it burns a LOT more than no stirrups work! You can hold mane to help with your balance initially.....that won't interfere with the strengthening component of it.
          __________________________________
          Flying F Sport Horses
          Horses in the NW

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by PNWjumper View Post
            Up two, down two and other variations of posting exercises (up two, down one, or up one, down two, etc.).

            Two point. And I like to do two point down the rail and then sitting trot in the corners/circles.

            Posting the canter.

            But really, just general no-stirrup riding is the ticket. I pulled my stirrups off of my mare's saddle in September and haven't ridden with them since. It's made a huge difference in my position and stability on my other horses. But you have to pay attention to HOW you're riding without stirrups. No-stirrup work should never cause you to pinch with your knee (in which case you're allowing yourself to do it incorrectly), and *should* help to strengthen your entire leg. You should have equal pressure from ankle to thigh and you should pay attention to whether your legs are equal and even (I initially dropped my stirrups because I was keeping one leg too far forward relative to the other).

            With that being said, I think there's a better exercise for strengthening and stabilizing your lower leg. If you really want to torture yourself, I suggest standing straight up in the stirrups during your warmup. It's the absolute best balance and leg-strengthening exercise and doesn't cause you to grip with your knee or risk harming your position in any way. It forces you to be rock solid with your base, and it burns a LOT more than no stirrups work! You can hold mane to help with your balance initially.....that won't interfere with the strengthening component of it.
            fantastic suggestions, will be crawling around tomorrow after my lesson!
            Atlas: Jag älskar min häst!

            "Without leaps of imagination, or dreaming, we lose the excitement of possibilities. Dreaming, after all, is a form of planning."

            Comment


            • #7
              Take stirrups off. 2point trot, canter...go into jockey position----even at a walk it is TERRIBLY difficult.......back to 2point etc......

              Hate to say...that a bloody crotch...etc..... will probably occur....

              w.o stirrups... trot fences....minimum 20 jumps don't have to be huge....

              5-8 fences....no strides or one strides...trot into.....at first w reins then no reins......

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Noodles View Post
                Take stirrups off. 2point trot, canter...go into jockey position----even at a walk it is TERRIBLY difficult.......back to 2point etc......

                Hate to say...that a bloody crotch...etc..... will probably occur....
                This has totally never happened to me when riding without stirrups! And I do it a LOT! Maybe I'm just lucky?

                I agree with doing all your regular exercises, but without stirrups. Posting, 2-point, jumping, etc. If that's too easy and you can ride just as well without your stirrups as with them, leg strength is not your problem.

                Also do lots of 2-point with stirrups to get your lower leg nice and tight.
                If the pony spits venom in your face or produces a loud roar, it is probably not a pony. Find another. -The Oatmeal

                Comment


                • #9
                  I am having the same problem, mostly due to previously riding western, and my trainer is having me stand straight up in the stirrups at the walk and trot during warm-up, and then later in practice, two-point at the canter. For the next two weeks I am not supposed to canter unless I am in two-point. She is not having me do any exercises without stirrups at this time.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Ya'll are hurting my pride and my back. I did a bit of no stirrup work today. It was going well enough when the muscles around my left SI joint spasmed. I couldn't get them to let go for the life of me, and the poor horse just kept doing shoulder-in left.
                    "Rock n' roll's not through, yeah, I'm sewing wings on this thing." --Destroyer
                    http://dressagescriblog.wordpress.com/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Ride bareback! Don't do a "bareback ride," ride as usual just sans saddle. It makes me really aware of how my seat is affecting my horse, and my legs usually feel like jello at the end too.
                      "Things turn out best for the people who make the best of the way things turn out." ~John Wooden

                      Phoenix Animal Rescue

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I agree with the exercises recommended above. Another suggestion: I agree with PNWJUMPER, when you're riding without stirrups, do not pinch with your knee. Keep your lower leg contact even, but also, sit on your seat bones! Equally applied weight distribution is absolute, and without stirrups, you will notice if you lean to one side or not. It would help if you could get someone to lunge you, without stirrups, too. That way you could focus on your seat in the beginning, not having to worry about the horse. Riding without stirrups so beneficial! When I was a teenager in the mid-80s, I lived in a large city in a former French colony, in West Africa. My Dad had a connection to the French military base, which had a riding stable that used to be the old cavalry stable. I had the opportunity to ride with the other French students at the barn. Imagine my surprise when I showed up for my first ride (AND, I didn't speak French yet, at the time) and there were no stirrups on the saddles. The instructor was a French Capitaine, in full uniform. We were only allowed to tack up the saddle (the local grooms did everything else, much to my dismay!). When we entered the ring, we had to stand in line, wait to be inspected by the Capitaine, and didn't mount until he approved. We did ALL our riding without stirrups!!! Flat work, gymnastics, jumping courses, EVERYTHING!

                        It took me a while to get used to it (and to figure out how to follow riding instructions in French...), but it was the best experience I ever had! Up until that point, I had only been riding at a local group lesson barn at the Marine Corps base stables in Quantico, VA. Basic hunt seat stuff, nothing like this. I didn't realize at the time that I was experiencing my first exposure to classic European riding, dressage, how it helped with jumping, etc. He'd work us on the flat, over cavallettis, and over a practice line of fences--no stirrups. We'd drop the reins several strides before and hold our arms out and jump; or, cover our eyes a few strides before the jump; or, jump with our hands on our helmets. Again, all without stirrups. It was fantastic for learning to ride with your seat, and to feel the horse beneath you.

                        Fortunately, the country we lived in (Senegal) had peanuts as its main export, but being just at the base of the Sahara desert, not much else vegetation. Ground up peanut shells were used to line the riding ring. All the horses were locally found small West Africa Arabs. VERY bouncy at the trot, fast, etc. The peanut shells made a nice cushion when I fell! To this day, I always spend saddle time without stirrups, particularly when I get "stuck" with my riding, or feel in a rut, I drop stirrups. Ironically, I sometimes find I ride better without them, than with. My leg seems to drop better, my thigh lies better. I agree with everyone above, ride without them (just take them off the saddle), and it will help tremendously! If you are uncertain at first, take an old stirrup leather and fashion a neck strap, or attach a "sissy strap" to the d-rings of the saddle, to help secure yourself and get that deep seat. Just don't tighten up your lower back, tense up, or grip with your knees or thighs, that will just pogo you in the saddle and send you upwards. Just go with the flow!
                        “Always saddle your own horse. Always know what you’re doing. And go in the direction you are heading.” Connie Reeves
                        Jump Start Solutions LLC

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by barnworkbeatshousework View Post
                          Ironically, I sometimes find I ride better without them, than with. My leg seems to drop better, my thigh lies better.
                          I have a friend who could win any eq class she entered if she could only ride stirrupless the whole time.
                          "Things turn out best for the people who make the best of the way things turn out." ~John Wooden

                          Phoenix Animal Rescue

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            We lived without our pedals on my college IHSA team.

                            The most important isn't outlasting everyone else "riding longer".

                            You need to maintain the correct position the entire time you are working without stirrups.

                            Lunge line work is really good if you have a trusty horse and buddy to hold the ropes.

                            Use lots of posting and two point at the trot, sitting is ok but more important to focus on the other- too much sitting trot leads to chair-seaty riding, imho.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Drop just one sturrip. Switch sturrips ever lap or so.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by KateKat View Post
                                I actually don't love no stirrups for myself unless I'm only planning to do sitting trot or canter. Posting without stirrups makes me grip too much with my knee, which kind of defeats the purpose of improving the lower leg, plus it tends to annoy my horse

                                So for me, what I actually like to do is a lot of two point. And I mean A LOT. Do it at all gaits, with transitions, etc. It not only helps me get into my heel more, it helps me really wrap my leg around my horse and is a great core workout.

                                The up-up-down or up-down-down exercise when posting (with irons) is another really good exercise to improve your balance and your leg. I'll do that one when I really feel like torturing myself.
                                This. No stirrups only helps if you do it properly, which I don't.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  I find often leg position problems stem from seat problems. Once the seat is really well established in the middle position it's much easier to keep your legs where they belong and develop that 'breathing' feeling.
                                  I would therefor go back one step and sit on two tennisballs. You'll find it will improve your position greatly and after a while you should find it a lot easier to work on your leg and calves
                                  Froh zu sein bedarf es wenig...
                                  http://www.germanhorseconnection.com
                                  https://www.facebook.com/pages/Germa...m/237648984580

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    gymnastics lines (little fences) with no stirrups... ooh and no reins too when you can handle all the stirrup-less stuff. Trot poles/ cavaletti exercises are great with no stirrups too.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Everything can be fixed with no stirrup work when done correctly, and I mean EVERYTHING. I fell into a rut a few days ago and whenever that happens to me I take the stirrups off of my saddle for a week. It always helps. I do sitting trot, posting trot, two point, sitting canter, posting canter, and canter in two point. I do shoulder in, lead changes, haunches in and leg yields. I jump small gymnastic lines (no bigger than 3' because my horse is a nutbar) and do circles, serpentines and figure eights. Just be really self disciplined! Don't pinch with your knee.. focus on keeping your toes turned out, even a little too much. You should not feel the burn in only one part of your leg.. it should be from your groin through your thigh and calf. The standing up one sounds like a good idea (and extremely painful..) I'll have to try it tomorrow!

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by Kareen View Post
                                        I find often leg position problems stem from seat problems. Once the seat is really well established in the middle position it's much easier to keep your legs where they belong and develop that 'breathing' feeling.
                                        I would therefor go back one step and sit on two tennisballs. You'll find it will improve your position greatly and after a while you should find it a lot easier to work on your leg and calves
                                        Kareen, what do you mean? Do you mean work on sitting on your "seat bones" or are you talking about actually putting two whole tennis balls between your butt and the saddle? I'm having a hard time with the visual or figuring out what you mean.

                                        Thanks!!
                                        DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X