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Horse training has reached a new low - Thanks Dover!

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  • Horse training has reached a new low - Thanks Dover!

    http://www.doversaddlery.com/the-dog...-30114/cn/109/

    An innovative training aid, well suited for horses with a tendency to carry their heads a bit too high. Functions like a standing martingale with two distinct differences. First, the entire middle section of the device is a heavy-duty rubber "Dog Bone", so it gives and stretches as the horse moves and settles into the correct position without excessive interference from the rider's hands. Second, the device snaps directly to the bit for more direct and effective communication once the horse has achieved the desired head set. Fully adjustable. D-ring snap to attach to girth. Stainless steel hardware. USA. In brown. One size.


    A whole new low. Now you can snap you horse's mouth directly to your girth. Awesome.

    Normally, I'm one that says that all tools have a place in the right hands. Not this one. It's entire purpose is "headset", though it completely ignores the biomechanics that lead to a proper "headset".

    I can't wait to see this thing running around the warm-up ring. *HEADDESK*
    "Are you yawning? You don't ride well enough to yawn. I can yawn, because I ride better than you. Meredith Michael Beerbaum can yawn. But you? Not so much..."
    -George Morris

  • #2
    I've seen it used by a dressage trainer's student at my barn and hated it.
    Last edited by Rel6; Jun. 1, 2011, 11:53 AM. Reason: yea...no. no purpose for this thing.

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #3
      But but but headset is function of the horse's correct use of the rest of their body. It isn't just a matter of putting the head down. It's about the back end tracking up and the back being lifted. Strapping your horse's head down doesn't "encourage a proper headset". It encourages a false frame and a strung out back end.
      "Are you yawning? You don't ride well enough to yawn. I can yawn, because I ride better than you. Meredith Michael Beerbaum can yawn. But you? Not so much..."
      -George Morris

      Comment


      • #4
        This looks like a recipe for a rear and flip-over in the right circumstances. If your horse spooks or gets over excited and hits that bit and gets no relief, it could end badly. Don't think I'd get on a horse with his mouth tied to his girth.
        "Your best can be worn at any length"- Jason Mraz

        Comment


        • #5
          Just what the horse world needs, another torture device in the hands of a bunch of hacks.
          The crap some horses have to put up with.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by SaturdayNightLive View Post
            But but but headset is function of the horse's correct use of the rest of their body. It isn't just a matter of putting the head down. It's about the back end tracking up and the back being lifted. Strapping your horse's head down doesn't "encourage a proper headset". It encourages a false frame and a strung out back end.
            This... I can't imagine literally strapping my horse's mouth to the girth
            Southern Cross Guest Ranch
            An All Inclusive Guest Ranch Vacation - Georgia

            Comment


            • #7
              The dang thing has to bang the horse in the mouth with every step. A girth isn't exactly a stationary point, and that thing looks tight. I agree it's a recipe for a flipover.
              "Rock n' roll's not through, yeah, I'm sewing wings on this thing." --Destroyer
              http://dressagescriblog.wordpress.com/

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by OveroHunter View Post
                This... I can't imagine literally strapping my horse's mouth to the girth
                Seriously! Why do we need something thats even worse than an standing martingale choked up so tight horse can barely move?? Ughhhhh.


                Disclaimer: I agree that standing martingales have their place in the correct hands, as do *most* training aids. But this...really???!!!!

                I would love if someone could point out an appropriate use for this thing.
                "Choose to chance the rapids, and dare to dance the tides" - Garth Brooks
                "With your permission, dear, I'll take my fences one at a time" - Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey

                Comment


                • #9
                  Good god I hope there is a safety break on that. I have some terrifying images of broken jaws going through my head right now.

                  This is a seriously high danger quotient, despite all the other things wrong with it.

                  Resisting this contraption is going to result in some seriously sore backs. Giving into it is going to result in some seriously weak hind ends.

                  I'm a bit shocked dover didn't just laugh this idea out of the park. Or at least show some concern for the horse's safety.
                  EHJ | FB | #140 | watch | #insta

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Sadly, this is just a fancier looking version of a tool I saw used QUITE OFTEN by some people in Florida. I saw it more frequently during our two week stint in Ocala than I did during the rest of the winter in Wellington. The ones I saw were homemade with baling twine, an O-Ring and two double-end snaps. I thought they were horrifying then, and now to see that this device is being marketed to the masses is even scarier.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      This has been around the Western world for ages now - it used to be called a "training fork". There was also this thing called a "Market Harborough" which was similar (I think that's what it was called) which was basically a running martingale with elastic "arms" that snapped directly to the horse's bit - I used to have one from years ago, when I showed low level hunters, and this was quite common. So, nothing new. In fact, I think I bought my MH from Dover back in the late 80's!

                      ***whoops, did a search on MH and it's not the same thing, but I do have one from the 80s that is basically the same - can't remember what it's called. haven't used it since the late 80's, either.
                      "Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison

                      So, the Zen Buddhist says to the hotdog vendor, "Make me one with everything."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        It makes me sad to think of any horse wearing that contraption, even the horse modeling it.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by eventer_mi View Post
                          This has been around the Western world for ages now - it used to be called a "training fork". There was also this thing called a "Market Harborough" which was similar (I think that's what it was called) which was basically a running martingale with elastic "arms" that snapped directly to the horse's bit - I used to have one from years ago, when I showed low level hunters, and this was quite common. So, nothing new. In fact, I think I bought my MH from Dover back in the late 80's!

                          ***whoops, did a search on MH and it's not the same thing, but I do have one from the 80s that is basically the same - can't remember what it's called. haven't used it since the late 80's, either.
                          That thing is neither a MH or a western training fork. You were right that a training for is basically a running martingale with elastic arms, and like a running martingale, the reins go through the rings... The only difference is the fork attaches to the girth and not a neck strap.
                          Southern Cross Guest Ranch
                          An All Inclusive Guest Ranch Vacation - Georgia

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by OveroHunter View Post
                            This... I can't imagine literally strapping my horse's mouth to the girth
                            Ever used sidereins? Just sayin'. Sidereins have a little more play, but still...


                            I do think this thing is a stupid, stupid idea and has no legitimate use other than an ill-advised shortcut that won't produce desired results. I, however, can see A LOT of similarities between drawreins, sidereins, etc. especially the way people misuse them.
                            Keith: "Now...let's do something normal fathers and daughters do."
                            Veronica: "Buy me a pony?"

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I'm guessing this would teach a horse to rear pretty quickly. Could they recover their balance without flipping with their head tied to the girth?

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I stand corrected, Overohunter. However, the thing that's covered in green mold in my tack trunk definitely clips to the bit, even though it has elastic on the "arms", and it attached between the front legs to the girth, so it's definitely identical to the dogbone thing in the Dover catalog.

                                I've seen the Western training fork attached directly to the bit (QH circuit in Michigan). So, what's the difference?
                                "Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison

                                So, the Zen Buddhist says to the hotdog vendor, "Make me one with everything."

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Side reins are NOT the same as this godawful thing. Sidereins act like reins and contact, and when used correctly are a very advantageous training aid. However, used incorrectly by someone with a poor eye and you can end up with incorrect muscling and horses who hate the longe.

                                  This thing, though, is different. The horse really can't evade it, and the only thing in my mind right now is a vision of someone putting this on a hot jumper and flipping. *shudder* even my bombproof, doesn't-give-a-$h!+ horse this would end badly. Although, poor old man is used to training gimmicks... previous owners.
                                  Trying a life outside of FEI tents and hotel rooms.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    And unlike side reins, this seems to be marketed as a riding tool, not for lunging. As well the angle of pressure on the bit is nothing like a rider's hands, with the bit rings being pulled down folding the bit up into the roof of the horse's mouth. Seems like a good tool to make the horse fear the bit. Lovely.
                                    Freeing worms from cans everywhere!

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      A strap from girth to bit rings? It's a single side rein, set at an extremely low angle.

                                      A strap from between the legs to the head with little to no give? It's like a standing martingale.

                                      This contraption, while awful and pointless, is no huge surprise.

                                      What annoys me far more is the proliferation of standings adjusted much too tightly and every single damn horse wearing them whether they need them or not. Why advertise your horse is a head flipper if he's not? Such the ridiculous fashion.
                                      ----------------------------------------
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                                      http://pssm.xanthoria.com/
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                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by RugBug View Post
                                        Ever used sidereins? Just sayin'. Sidereins have a little more play, but still...
                                        Actually, no for the same reason; however, I will confess to using a neck stretchers, but only for lunging, never riding.



                                        Originally posted by eventer_mi View Post
                                        I've seen the Western training fork attached directly to the bit (QH circuit in Michigan). So, what's the difference?
                                        The intended purpose.
                                        Southern Cross Guest Ranch
                                        An All Inclusive Guest Ranch Vacation - Georgia

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