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Dream horse so close I can almost touch him

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  • Dream horse so close I can almost touch him

    A few years ago my farrier and good friend purchased a yearling grey gelding. I just loved the way he looked and said when your done with him, racing and what not, I want him. Well over the next year or so he got huge. 17 hands and a tanks, nothing like a tb so I wanted him even more.

    He went off to trainning and shortly after being there he got loose and ran between the fence and a horse bus. Whacked his hip really good. The vets were unable to get x-rays because it was so high up but from the looks of it they thought he broke his hip and said to consider putting him down. Owner decided that as long as his other legs held up he would give him a chance. Well he fully recovered.

    Last summer I got the opportunity to help break him and work with him. He was so smart about everything and I just feel in love. The owner was going back and forth about selling him or taking him to the track. We showed him to a few people but nothing much. My horse ended up passing away in Nov and was hoping to get the chance to lease the grey (Danny)

    Well that didn't work out and he went to the track. I now have a 6 months lease on another horse that ends in two months and not sure if its going to be renewed. Danny's owner calls me up today and says he is to big to hold up for racing, he is yours if you want him.

    I Just graduated college last year and am working on getting my CPA so money is tight and my parents are not thrilled. I want this so bad. This is the only horse I have really fallen for other than my last horse. I dont know what to do.

  • #2
    well you know what we're all going to say....


    BUY HIM!

    Comment


    • #3
      Would the owner let you lease him until you can get the money together to buy him?
      I mean, if the owner knows 100% sure you will buy, they would actually win in this situation..
      If they called you, they know you really want him, maybe they can work something out for you?
      or like a payment plan kind of thing? you would pay an amount every month until you pay him off?

      Comment


      • #4
        Big TB gelding named Danny?! And he's your dream horse?

        Buy him!

        (ok well I might not be the voice of reason... because I went through a similarly long saga of lusting after a big TB named Dan... and I did buy him... and it was one of the best things I did!)
        We couldn't all be cowboys, so some of us are clowns.

        Comment


        • #5
          I think when the timing is right the perfect horse will fall into your lap. While I am sure he is lovely horses like him are not exactly in short supply.
          McDowell Racing Stables

          Home Away From Home

          Comment


          • #6
            Make it happen. You'll always regret it if you pass him by. If I've learned anything in my 52 years, it is go with your gut. Others may approve or disapprove of anything you do, but at the end of the day, YOU are the one who has to live with the decision.
            ~Kryswyn~ Always look on the bright side of life, de doo, de doo de doo de doo
            Check out my Kryswyn JRTs on Facebook

            "Life is merrier with a terrier!"

            Comment


            • #7
              Just a question about soundness - when the current race track owner said he was too big to hold up to racing...has he been lame? Something you might want to ask/consider.

              Also, my horse fractured his hip in a fall when he was 4. He also "recovered" completely, but be aware that you are going to be faced with joint maintenance issues probably a little earlier than most folks (for my horse, it is both SI area and stifle...stifle gets jacked up from dealing with compensating for that hip). Not saying you shouldn't buy him for that reason - just go into it with eyes open that you are going to need to budget for joint maintenance down the road.

              Comment


              • #8
                Don't ever pass up something that you really want.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Just do it,it will all work out.You must always learn to trust your gut!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Is there a cheap pasture board place you can keep him for 2 months. Let the owners of the lease horse know YOU won't be renewing the lease and why so they can look for a new person. In 2 months you would be back to 1 horse and he will have had 2 months of let down time.


                    Christa

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Christa P View Post
                      Is there a cheap pasture board place you can keep him for 2 months. Let the owners of the lease horse know YOU won't be renewing the lease and why so they can look for a new person. In 2 months you would be back to 1 horse and he will have had 2 months of let down time.


                      Christa
                      This!
                      \"In all manners of opinion, our adversaries are insane.\" Mark Twain

                      Comment

                      • Original Poster

                        #12
                        He would be giving him to me so I would not have to come up with money to purchase him just money to keep him. He same up with a suspensory injury last week that is why he is done with him. I dont know alot about this type of injury other than I know a few horses that have had it in the past. I would need to look into it more and have my vet look at his x-rays.

                        I would do a pre-purchase exam on him and if they told me he could not do what I wanted I would have to pass him up. The last horse I had the vet told us that he had arthritis in his hocks so she didn't suggust doing much 3 foot with him. That wasn't a big deal when I was 10 but it became a problem and even though the vet later said he could do it, my mom was set on No he is not.

                        There is just something about this horse that I love. I didn't do a whole lot with him since he was basicly being broke to race but I did do a little jumping and some lead chages. I think if I would have continued with him, he would be cruising over 2'6 course.

                        I have add some links to his pictures and a couple videos. I know my Equ. is all over the place. Pulled the tall boots out after a long time of being in the closet. I wanted some nice pictures so I through them on. And it was a day in the 70s and I was in a long sleeve shirt lol.

                        http://s35.photobucket.com/albums/d178/jay0087/Danny/

                        Danny trotting less than a month of being broke
                        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wxkrnVGjGrA
                        Cantering
                        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0_BKlq2WriA
                        Cantering a fence
                        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=navkkVg-Tvc

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          So the horse is lame.

                          Suspensory injuries can take 3-6 months up to a year to be completely healed.
                          And this also mean stall confinement... and short in-hand walking. and vet x-ray or echo occassionnaly to check the progression.

                          So even if you don't have to pay money to 'buy' the horse, you'll have to pay good money for stall, vet treatment/visits, and not be able to ride or do anything with that horse for a long period.

                          (Don't you think the owner would prefer not to have to deal with such problem...horses aren't free for no reason...)Sorry.

                          If you really want to go thru a PPE, which will be difficult to do because the horse is lame from the suspensory injury so might hide another lameness and prevent from seeing any other locomotion troubles that wouldn't be related to this known injury.

                          Try first asking for the x-rays or the owner's vet record first and hand this to your vet for further examination. Then ask him is advice.

                          Good luck!
                          ~ Enjoying some guac and boxed wine at the Blue Saddle inn. ~

                          Originally posted by LauraKY
                          I'm sorry, but this has "eau de hoarder" smell all over it.
                          HORSING mobile training app

                          Comment

                          • Original Poster

                            #14
                            Originally posted by alibi_18 View Post
                            So the horse is lame.

                            Suspensory injuries can take 3-6 months up to a year to be completely healed.
                            And this also mean stall confinement... and short in-hand walking. and vet x-ray or echo occassionnaly to check the progression.

                            So even if you don't have to pay money to 'buy' the horse, you'll have to pay good money for stall, vet treatment/visits, and not be able to ride or do anything with that horse for a long period.

                            (Don't you think the owner would prefer not to have to deal with such problem...horses aren't free for no reason...)Sorry.

                            If you really want to go thru a PPE, which will be difficult to do because the horse is lame from the suspensory injury so might hide another lameness and prevent from seeing any other locomotion troubles that wouldn't be related to this known injury.

                            Try first asking for the x-rays or the owner's vet record first and hand this to your vet for further examination. Then ask him is advice.

                            Good luck!
                            Thanks! I am going to ask if he will keep him at his place for a couple months, if I pay the feed and hay and do all 6 of his stalls during the week. That way I can take my time to decide and see if this is something I can even do. Or see how he is holding up after 2 months rest. I know he wants him gone but I would also hope he knows how much I love the horse and how much I have helped him in the past.

                            If he can't do that and I can't figure something out I feel comfortable with, I will have to let him go. I can't make this decision over the weekend

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              the horse isn't sound to race. That's a long way from not being sound enough to carry somebody around 2'6" - and a young busy professional starting a career, I gotta guess, the horse won't be ridden into the ground. LOL. Not for one minute disputing the advice to ask for all vet records and to get all the input from your vet you can before making your final decision...but, look at EVERYTHING, including how much riding you are realisticly going to be doing, AND the fact that this horse's temperment seems to be pretty suitable. In the canter fence video, I saw what must be a pretty green race horse take a fairly rusty rider over that crossrail with a demeanor that would do a steady eddy lesson horse credit. Stats wise, there are probably 100's just like him around, but brain-wise? mmmmmmmm, not so sure about that. There's a current thread on suspensory injuries on the eventing board, you might want to look at that, too.
                              Blog: The Continuing Adventures of an (ahem) Mature Re-Rider without a Trust Fund...but, finally, A Farm of Her Own!!

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                on the virtues of dream horses and "just going for it"

                                I'm a re-rider (who took 29 years off ) and bought my horse in grad school. I didn't know when I bought him if I would even find a job in my field soon enough after graduation to be able to keep him - I thought I might be forced to sell him, if I had to relocate to a very high cost of living area, etc, etc. Nonetheless, I decided to take it a year at a time, and enjoy him while I could have him. Best decision I ever made for myself. He was older than I really wanted, so I knew eventually I would deal with maintenance issues that, again, I wasn't sure if I could afford.

                                I can't imagine life without him. Even if he becomes a pasture puff tomorrow, and I have to find some other way to keep riding, if you lose your heart to one, the relationship is about more than riding, and they will always have things to teach you about horses and horsemanship - and yourself. Just my $.02.
                                Blog: The Continuing Adventures of an (ahem) Mature Re-Rider without a Trust Fund...but, finally, A Farm of Her Own!!

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  You really need a vet's perspective on the suspensory injury to make an educated decision. Some horses recover with no issues, others do not.

                                  My OTTB came off the track with an apical sesamoid fracture and a "tweak" to his suspensory on his FL but both injuries were minor. He was rehabbed by his racing owners and then retired. I've foxhunted him the past three seasons without any issues.

                                  I restarted him very slowly to see if there would be any problems on that leg but I think his owners did a very good job during his recovery.
                                  Equine Ink - My soapbox for equestrian writings & reviews.
                                  EquestrianHow2 - Operating instructions for your horse.

                                  Comment

                                  • Original Poster

                                    #18
                                    He is a very sweet horse. The only thing he has ever really done is through a few little bucks and put on the parking brake and not want to go forward. I did not jump him very much so he is really green. I am not the prettiest of riders and must admit that was a very bad day of riding for me. Not normally that bad and usually stronger. Although I am now having to work on sitting back, after not having to ride a challenging horse in a long time. My old guy was a good ride so I would just kinda jump and ride and not really work on anything. Plus not riding alot while in college has not helped. The horse I am leasing is really making me work for my ride.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Alrighty, time for some tough love. Free horses are not FREE. Danny is handsome, but likely has soundness issues that will cost you a fortune, tons of disappointment, and he will probably end up as a pasture ornament. This type of horse is a dime a dozen, I promise you will find another Danny.
                                      Focus on your career, continue leasing horses until you are financially ready to commit to a young horse to bring along.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by kelsey97 View Post
                                        Alrighty, time for some tough love. Free horses are not FREE. Danny is handsome, but likely has soundness issues that will cost you a fortune, tons of disappointment, and he will probably end up as a pasture ornament. This type of horse is a dime a dozen, I promise you will find another Danny.
                                        Focus on your career, continue leasing horses until you are financially ready to commit to a young horse to bring along.
                                        Wow. Because he has a suspensory injury he is automatically going to be a pasture ornament?

                                        Weird, my horse raced as a 3 year old, pulled his suspensory and was off for a year and never raced again. Hes 15 now next week, never been off a day in his life. In fact he just put his foot through a fence 6 weeks ago. tons and tons of stitches later and 6 weeks stall rest/hand walking (eventually) he never took ONE off step and just went back to work this week. This was the first time hes ever done something like that. He has been the horse of a lifetime and really has had no issues, knock on wood. This horse also cribs and when its feed time he sways a little bit.

                                        I dont think Danny will be a pasture ornament, give him a chance, you never know what may happen. He's a very cute boy!

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