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Bathing Tecniques?

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  • Bathing Tecniques?

    What are your tecniques to super good bubble baths? I am not a good bath giver and when I think i do a good job my horse is still filthy! What are the tricks to making your horse shine?

  • #2
    I'm not a huge bubble bath fan, I'm more of a currying and plain water person, but when I bathe, I usually do this:

    Use vetrolin bath shampoo (diluted in a bucket). Other soaps are cool too, I just like this one for my dark bay, i think it has a little extra shine power. Apply with sponge and suds it all around, then take one of those jelly scrubbers and suds some more (my girl loves the scratching ). Let it sit for a few minutes, ie. do 1 side and don't rinse before you do the other. I use a drop of baby shampoo for the face.

    Voila, clean beastie

    Comment


    • #3
      First of all it helps to really keep your horse clean with good grooming, that's where your hair quality and shine come from. But a good bath can really make them sparkle.

      I would start with warm water and good water pressure. If you can't get down to the skin you won't lift the dirt out. Really wet the coat down first. Then use your favorite shampoo, I'm not big on any brand, though the whitening ones do help for socks.
      Use one of those soft currys and really scrub! Just remember not to go too nuts on the legs because you can irritate them. Make sure the mane and tail are cleaned down to the roots.

      Don't forget the head! Use a ladder if you have to, nothing like a clean horse that stops at the head.

      Then rinse, with pressure! now rinse some more, most of the problems come from not getting out the soap/dirt thru improper rinsing. If you are short, back on the step stool to rinse the back and mane well.

      Finally put show sheen in the tail and towel off the legs and head well. Don't forget to wipe out ears and lightly oil them.

      So now your horse looks like a million bucks.
      "Your best can be worn at any length"- Jason Mraz

      Comment


      • #4
        When bubble-bathing, this is my routine:

        Wet down horse.

        Then, I use a coconut-oil based natural dish washing liquid (no harsh chemicals). Squirt some on a sponge and scrub in circles, starting just below the ear, and go all the way to butt (don't forget tummy chest/under chest).

        Next, I do the mane & tail with Head & Shoulders. I squirt some on the main and scrub down to the skin with finger nails; don't forget the bridal path up to and between ears. For the tail, I get 1/2 bucket warm water and make suds with Head & Shoulders. Bring bucket up behind tail so that tail and tail bone get bathed (you'll have to scrub with a sponge/fingers to get down to the bone near the top)

        Do the legs next. I use a sponge on the upper, and a bristle brush on the lowers in a downward stroking motion only. If legs are pretty clean, I'll stick with the natural dish soap. If not, I'll use the H&S to cut crud.

        Last is the face. I'll use unscented natural baby shampoo for the forelock and all of the face.

        Rinse time! Mainly, I'll hose off. Then, I do a bucket rinse with several "glubs" of vinegar to finish off.

        Shouldn't really do bubble baths more than once a week.

        Comment


        • #5
          My trick is to curry with the shampoo on. And curry while you're rinsing- the best way to get a good clean rinse.

          Comment


          • #6
            I like to use just some cheap walmart body wash. smells good and works great! I fill a 8qt bucket with water and about 3Tsb to about 1/4 cup (no I don't measure it, just guess) of soap. use that to wash whole body, mane tail, and gently on the face. Scrubbing in circles with the sponge to get them all soapy! I ad a little extra soap and some conditioner to the mane and tail and scrub good with my fingers. I get a stiff brush and scrub the hooves, it gets all that cruddy stuff off at the coronet.

            Then rinse away, good water pressure is a plus! currying while rinsing is a good idea, I will try that, sometimes I just scrape (sweat scraper) them while I am rinsing, putting fresh water over where I just scraped, if that makes any sense.


            I will be grooming my sisters horse for his Keuring this weekend. I too will be looking at all these tips. We have been currying like crazy for that last few weeks. Her horse loved it!

            Comment


            • #7
              I wet half the horse, scrub that side with a short bristled hard brush, making sure to get lots of suds. Then move to the other side, we it down, scrub it and then start rinsing from the first side first. Special scrubbing usually goes into the tail (especially underneath and the sides of the tail bone), the mane and hocks/knees. Both my horses require a rag/sponge bath for the head, but the works very well too. Shampoo wise I'm a big fan of the cheap Swave Coconut shampoo. It shines up real well and it smells really good. I also always scrub the hooves last because it can make the brush muddy/dirty.

              Here are some other tips I've gathered after years of production/showmanship:
              -groom daily with showsheen or hair moisturizer (I prefer the later), it helps repel dirt and adds great shine to the coat and detangles mane/tail.
              -for black/bay horses bath frequently with Quick Color. It helps deepen the coat color, especially if they start to bleach out from the sun.
              -Quick Silver is the anwser to white horses. You have to make sure you lather it into a white foam (must use enough water), let it sit for awhile and then rinse.
              -to keep a tail full, long and clean (especially white ones) keep it in a tail bag!!

              *i have a big black and white paint (mostly white) mare that LOVES to be dirty. if you would like a detailed description on how to make a white horse white i can give you a lot more tips....i showed her in showmanship and believe me, she was SPOTLESS

              Comment


              • #8
                I add a glug of white vinegar to a small bucket of water, then use it as a final rinse (after rinsing off all suds first). The vinegar cuts through any soap residue and leaves a nice shine. The horse will not smell like vinegar after it dries.
                I've spent most of my life riding horses. The rest I've just wasted.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I like one of the net scrubbies that I have for myself. They do a great job of getting all the way down without being harsh.
                  A proud friend of bar.ka.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I only bathe the day before leaving for a show. My guys doesn't have socks, so any quality shampoo will do. My favorite tool is a brush with a sponge in the center. I use it like a curry and it gets up ALL the dirt!!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by EquitationRider View Post
                      What are your tecniques to super good bubble baths? I am not a good bath giver and when I think i do a good job my horse is still filthy! What are the tricks to making your horse shine?
                      I like to curry the soap in, so it gets down to their skin. And I bathe relatively often - once a week or so ideally. Lots of currying on non-bath days. I don't agree with anyone that says soap dries out the hair or is bad for them. Most arab farms rinse every day, and full soap & conditioner baths at least a couple times a week, and the horses have fantastic coats. I feel like if you're not doing baths often enough they just keep building up more dirt and grossness. In addition the stains set in, and are more difficult to get out, even with skilled grooming.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by nickers@dawn View Post
                        First of all it helps to really keep your horse clean with good grooming, that's where your hair quality and shine come from. But a good bath can really make them sparkle.

                        I would start with warm water and good water pressure. If you can't get down to the skin you won't lift the dirt out. Really wet the coat down first. Then use your favorite shampoo, I'm not big on any brand, though the whitening ones do help for socks.
                        Use one of those soft currys and really scrub! Just remember not to go too nuts on the legs because you can irritate them. Make sure the mane and tail are cleaned down to the roots.

                        Don't forget the head! Use a ladder if you have to, nothing like a clean horse that stops at the head.

                        Then rinse, with pressure! now rinse some more, most of the problems come from not getting out the soap/dirt thru improper rinsing. If you are short, back on the step stool to rinse the back and mane well.

                        Finally put show sheen in the tail and towel off the legs and head well. Don't forget to wipe out ears and lightly oil them.

                        So now your horse looks like a million bucks.
                        This. But I am a big fan of Orvis. I have yet to see anything else create such a shine. Also...like the others have said-save the bubble baths for when they are really really dirty, or before showing. Grooming and water are best for the inbetween-then when you do give a bath, they are even shinier!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          My horse has had exactly two full bubble baths in the 16 months I've had him, and I only gave him one of them.

                          My old guy had maybe 10 bubble baths in all 5 years.

                          Granted, they're both bay.

                          I've bathed a grey that I showed for a girl more 12 times.... so more than both my own horses combined.



                          As far as good baths... I use a big sea sponge and whatever shampoo I have laying around, maybe 1/3 of a cup in a little bucket then all the way full of water. Wash circles with the sponge, curry, rinse, curry, rinse, scrape, rinse, scrape again.

                          I'm also a fan of white vinegar, but I do diluted half and half on a clean rag and rub the horse all over with it. For white socks I dry with a towel and spray some rubbing alcohol on to get them dry quick before they get dirty.
                          friend of bar.ka

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            1. Soak horse.
                            2. Add a dollop of shampoo (I use Vetrolin bath) to a small bucket of water. Sponge over horse, rubbing in lightly.
                            3. Rinse.
                            4. Refill your small bucket and add a dollop or two of shampoo. Sponge generously over horse.
                            5. Using a soft curry (like a jelly scrubber), scrub the horse down. I like to keep a soapy sponge in the other hand and add soapy water as needed.
                            6. Top the bucket off with water, dunk the tail, and scrub.
                            7. Rinse very very thoroughly. I do one side, then the other, back to the first side again, and the other side again.
                            Against My Better Judgement: A blog about my new FLF OTTB
                            Do not buy a Volkswagen. I did and I regret it.
                            VW sucks.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I like to add about a couple drops of baby oil to the shampoo/water. Im also a big fan of the vinegar rinse afterwards. My favorite shampoos are Quiksilver and Healing tree tea tree oil shampoo. Warm water works best.
                              "To do something that you feel in your heart that's great, you need to make a lot of mistakes. Anything that is successful is a series of mistakes." -B.J. Armstrong

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                How do you all wash your horses' tails so easily? Is my mare just weird? She HATES when I'm trying to do her tail and I use a bucket. The skirt is fine, but as soon as the water hits her dock, watch out! She will tuck her bum, scoot around, threaten to kick... any suggestions? Love all the other tips mentioned so far!

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  I use a pair of scrubby gloves that I bought in the bath section at the dollar store. Wet the horse well, apply a line of shampoo down the neck, back and butt. Use the gloves to make suds, scrub well. Add shampoo to the underside and legs by putting a dallup on the gloves and rubbing in well. Use the fingers on the gloves to get in around the tendons on the legs. Spray horse lightly with water. Rub all over again making more suds. Rinse horse well. Remove gloves. Wash tail.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by Tuesday's Child View Post
                                    How do you all wash your horses' tails so easily? Is my mare just weird? She HATES when I'm trying to do her tail and I use a bucket. The skirt is fine, but as soon as the water hits her dock, watch out! She will tuck her bum, scoot around, threaten to kick... any suggestions? Love all the other tips mentioned so far!
                                    We have a mare that tucks her bum and scoots too. For her, with the bucket? I go slow and use warm water. I also get the bucket just below the tail bone. When it is there, I use a sponge and my hand (you could use one of those mitt scubbers too) and gently wash her tailbone. For rinsing, I either just do warm bucket rinse soaks, or, with the hose I put it on a slow setting. She wound up being fine with that ...


                                    Forgot to mention .... prior to bathing ... I curry, curry, curry; vacuum, then do my bath routine.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      I bubble bathe my horse as little as possible, but rinse often and well and groom deeply at least once a week. Before a bubble bath I do a deep grooming to get up as much dirt and loose hair as I can as well as to spread the oils along the coat. Then horse gets thoroughly wetted down with pressure to help lift remaining dirt. I half fill a small bucket with water and a squirt of shampoo, right now I've been using the Pyranha shampoo with really good results. To suds up the horse I use a regular rubber currey and squirt a little shampoo into the center section. As needed I rinse the curry in the little bucket and rewet the curry. Once both sides of the horse have been curried I rinse off the horse with pressure to rinse away dirt and suds. Then I go back over with the curry to lift up any remaining dirt and rinse again. Tail and mane get washed, with another thorough rinse afterwards. I wash the face with an auto wash mitt which holds water and tearless baby shampoo really well without dripping all over the place. To rinse the face I use the same mitt but after it's been rinsed clean, then continue to rinse the mitt often. Sometimes I will apply a coat conditioner, but not terribly often.
                                      "Beware the hobby that eats."
                                      Benjamin Franklin

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by SolarFlare View Post
                                        I add a glug of white vinegar to a small bucket of water, then use it as a final rinse (after rinsing off all suds first). The vinegar cuts through any soap residue and leaves a nice shine. The horse will not smell like vinegar after it dries.
                                        Apple cider vinegar gives the same results and works as a mild insect repellent as well.

                                        Comment

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