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Sophie Gochman op-ed and follow ups.

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    Originally posted by RainWeasley View Post

    Yeah there were like, what, three accounts at least that all spoke differently but were the same person.
    I am always amazed by people who seem to think that is a productive use of their time. But whatever.

    Comment


      Originally posted by RainWeasley View Post

      Yeah there were like, what, three accounts at least that all spoke differently but were the same person.
      I think the original one was Flash44, which I thought was too bad because she had been here a long time and was a good poster.

      *****
      You will not rise to the occasion, you will default to your level of training.

      Comment


        Originally posted by Midge View Post

        I think the original one was Flash44, which I thought was too bad because she had been here a long time and was a good poster.
        Wow, really?!? I’m surprised by that one.

        Comment


          For those who wondered about Missy Clark’s follow through:

          https://m.facebook.com/story.php?sto...cus_composer=0

          Comment


            Originally posted by MHM View Post

            Wow, really?!? I’m surprised by that one.
            I was too.
            *****
            You will not rise to the occasion, you will default to your level of training.

            Comment


              Originally posted by skydy View Post

              Sorry snaffle, you don't own or breed racehorses, no matter how many times you try to convince people that you do. That fact has been made clear by you and your own posts. You seem to lose track of what you write from day to day.

              Trying to explain your ignorance where racing, breeding and sales are concerned by claiming you just own horses and let others do the work is pitiful.
              I also recall posts about a 25 acre farm and all the fancy broodmares that lived there... or was it 25 broodmares and the farm's size was not mentioned... or was it $25,000 bid at Fasig-Tipton.... or was it a $25,000 stud fee she paid ... or... I am sorry, I forget the exact amounts now. After a while all the contradictory posts just turn into one big Mmmmmmmkay.

              Comment


                Originally posted by smoofox View Post

                I also recall posts about a 25 acre farm and all the fancy broodmares that lived there... or was it 25 broodmares and the farm's size was not mentioned... or was it $25,000 bid at Fasig-Tipton.... or was it a $25,000 stud fee she paid ... or... I am sorry, I forget the exact amounts now. After a while all the contradictory posts just turn into one big Mmmmmmmkay.
                I remember this https://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/f...keeneland-sept

                Comment


                  ...and this https://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/f...kentucky-sales

                  MHM thanks for the link to the Facebook press release from North Run. It's too bad that the current (virus) situation precludes the implementation of the most important part of the program, but it seems like a fine idea.

                  Comment


                    Originally posted by skydy View Post
                    ...and this https://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/f...kentucky-sales

                    MHM thanks for the link to the Facebook press release from North Run. It's too bad that the current (virus) situation precludes the implementation of the most important part of the program, but it seems like a fine idea.
                    I think COVID-19 has unfortunately causes some important timely programs to pause. Morehouse introduced its first polo team this year in February and had high hopes for this program. I find it interesting of all the HBCUs this appears to be the first to initiate such a program, and I'd love to see other HBCUs introducing equestrian programs.

                    https://hbcubuzz.com/2020/02/first-e...house-college/

                    Here in Atlanta most HBCUs are located in the city, but even GA Tech (in middle of Midtown) has an IHSA team and their students travel to the 'burbs for lessons. I would think the HBCUs could offer similar programs if there is interest. The beautiful thing about college/university is that you can generally create a club when one doesn't exist, and you can solicit funds from the SOC. I started two clubs at University because there were no SIGs (special interest groups) that met my interests, yet there were student who wanted to get together and we rallied a professor to sponsor us. It took a little work and petitioning but we got it done. I wonder if there are any Clark Atlanta, Morehouse or Spelman students who would like to ride and participate in IHSA? And what would it take to get them off the ground in the middle of a global pandemic? I would be curious what interest there is among students, especially since the men were able to ramp up a polo team relatively quickly once it came to fruition.

                    Comment


                      Originally posted by atl_hunter View Post

                      I wonder if there are any Clark Atlanta, Morehouse or Spelman students who would like to ride and participate in IHSA? And what would it take to get them off the ground in the middle of a global pandemic? I would be curious what interest there is among students, especially since the men were able to ramp up a polo team relatively quickly once it came to fruition.
                      One nice thing about IHSA is that there are horse show classes for all levels, right down to walk-trot. So even the riders who are completely new to horses can get the chance to compete before long.

                      Comment


                        Originally posted by MHM View Post
                        One nice thing about IHSA is that there are horse show classes for all levels, right down to walk-trot. So even the riders who are completely new to horses can get the chance to compete before long.
                        That is exactly what I was thinking - it's extremely inclusive due to the levels. For example, I know that the GA Tech program was extremely attractive to Asian students who never had the opportunity to ride in their respective countries, and IHSA provided a relatively level playing field for them to start even though they were older novices. I would think that some of the charter schools here could also offer an IEA program.

                        Comment


                          Originally posted by atl_hunter View Post

                          That is exactly what I was thinking - it's extremely inclusive due to the levels. For example, I know that the GA Tech program was extremely attractive to Asian students who never had the opportunity to ride in their respective countries, and IHSA provided a relatively level playing field for them to start even though they were older novices. I would think that some of the charter schools here could also offer an IEA program.
                          I wish that this were true... but ISHA and IEA are SO competitive now and with so many kids interested, you really do have to be best of the best to be successful. Especially at those big schools in the south where ISHA and it's equivalents are so popular. It still costs an exorbitant amount of money, and like many other parts of the equine world, it's known to be pretty discriminitory in terms of BG and especially body image.

                          In the northeast, girls who have ridden for their whole life never make it out of walk/trot division in ISHA because so many girls on the team have ridden big hunter classes and done the circuits. Eventually you point out... so then you just wait for a space to show in a different level that never comes. It's a great idea, but not well executed, and definitely not a solution to everything mentioned in this thread prior.

                          Comment


                            Originally posted by blue_heron View Post

                            I wish that this were true... but ISHA and IEA are SO competitive now and with so many kids interested, you really do have to be best of the best to be successful. Especially at those big schools in the south where ISHA and it's equivalents are so popular. It still costs an exorbitant amount of money, and like many other parts of the equine world, it's known to be pretty discriminitory in terms of BG and especially body image.

                            In the northeast, girls who have ridden for their whole life never make it out of walk/trot division in ISHA because so many girls on the team have ridden big hunter classes and done the circuits. Eventually you point out... so then you just wait for a space to show in a different level that never comes. It's a great idea, but not well executed, and definitely not a solution to everything mentioned in this thread prior.
                            I did not find that to be the case at all, and I rode on one of the most competitive teams in the country. I don't have an ideal body type or an extensive A circuit record. I'd only shown low level dressage and eventing when I first tried out, yet I made it on the team at novice (now limit), which was the most competitive division.

                            It also sounds like you don't really know how IHSA works. To be in walk-trot, you can't have had more than 24 weeks of instruction and walk-trot-canter riders can't have competed recognized at all. So there aren't circuit kids getting stuck in the low levels with nowhere to go.

                            I know a lot of riders who really had a chance to shine after not being able to show much in their junior careers due to expenses. Colleges with varsity teams and good club funding especially can offset a lot of the cost for the riders. IEA not so much, but both are great ways to get exposure.

                            Comment


                              Originally posted by initiate1987 View Post

                              I did not find that to be the case at all, and I rode on one of the most competitive teams in the country. I don't have an ideal body type or an extensive A circuit record. I'd only shown low level dressage and eventing when I first tried out, yet I made it on the team at novice (now limit), which was the most competitive division.

                              It also sounds like you don't really know how IHSA works. To be in walk-trot, you can't have had more than 24 weeks of instruction and walk-trot-canter riders can't have competed recognized at all. So there aren't circuit kids getting stuck in the low levels with nowhere to go.

                              I know a lot of riders who really had a chance to shine after not being able to show much in their junior careers due to expenses. Colleges with varsity teams and good club funding especially can offset a lot of the cost for the riders. IEA not so much, but both are great ways to get exposure.
                              I was in IHSA through college. Perhaps my zone was full of rule breakers, but that was my personal experience as well as many others I talked to. I cannot see it being a nurturing introduction to the sport, but I'm glad you had fun with it!
                              My parents did not fund my equine education other than the initial purchase price of my first horse ($1000). I cannot imagine how difficult it would be if horses with not only financially, but geographically inaccessible.

                              Comment


                                Originally posted by blue_heron View Post

                                I was in IHSA through college. Perhaps my zone was full of rule breakers, but that was my personal experience as well as many others I talked to. I cannot see it being a nurturing introduction to the sport, but I'm glad you had fun with it!
                                My parents did not fund my equine education other than the initial purchase price of my first horse ($1000). I cannot imagine how difficult it would be if horses with not only financially, but geographically inaccessible.
                                I'm wondering if initiate1987 and blue_heron were in IHSA at radically different times. I was there in the mid 1990s in NY State and what blue says above is very descriptive of my experiences. I was put in the lowest level classes they could possibly get away with, despite years of experience and shows. It was not done by weeks of instruction, but rather by the ribbons you had won in non-IHSA classes. Since I was pretty much always middle of the pack, I didn't have enough blues to eliminate me from the divisions. Pointing out once you were in IHSA was still there, but they did not keep as close a track of your previous history in the ring as they seem to now.

                                I have friends who are coaches for two different IHSA teams in my part of the world now and the stories they tell of girls digging through social media posts of their competition to call out those who have dq-ed are wild!

                                Comment


                                  Originally posted by ecileh View Post

                                  I'm wondering if initiate1987 and blue_heron were in IHSA at radically different times. I was there in the mid 1990s in NY State and what blue says above is very descriptive of my experiences. I was put in the lowest level classes they could possibly get away with, despite years of experience and shows. It was not done by weeks of instruction, but rather by the ribbons you had won in non-IHSA classes. Since I was pretty much always middle of the pack, I didn't have enough blues to eliminate me from the divisions. Pointing out once you were in IHSA was still there, but they did not keep as close a track of your previous history in the ring as they seem to now.

                                  I have friends who are coaches for two different IHSA teams in my part of the world now and the stories they tell of girls digging through social media posts of their competition to call out those who have dq-ed are wild!
                                  I was in college within the past five years. This is very recent. We had a full team and a big zone, showed against some huge state schools. We had tryouts, but I remember certain girls on the team would skip the fall IHSA shows to go show at regionals. We had one girl want time off to go to Wellington, but she was told she would have to leave the team (didn't go, was fine with being booted from the team but didn't have the $$).

                                  There was a little social media stalking but nothing so mean-spirited. Still not a welcoming and encouraging environment though. Everyone was "nice," but BG/body figure/clothes you wore DEFINITELY mattered to the team.

                                  I know I'm not the only person who experiences this, but it is comforting to know that ISHA provides opportunities for hard-working riders somewhere-- just not in my position.

                                  Comment


                                    Originally posted by ecileh View Post

                                    I'm wondering if initiate1987 and blue_heron were in IHSA at radically different times. I was there in the mid 1990s in NY State and what blue says above is very descriptive of my experiences. I was put in the lowest level classes they could possibly get away with, despite years of experience and shows. It was not done by weeks of instruction, but rather by the ribbons you had won in non-IHSA classes. Since I was pretty much always middle of the pack, I didn't have enough blues to eliminate me from the divisions. Pointing out once you were in IHSA was still there, but they did not keep as close a track of your previous history in the ring as they seem to now.

                                    I have friends who are coaches for two different IHSA teams in my part of the world now and the stories they tell of girls digging through social media posts of their competition to call out those who have dq-ed are wild!
                                    I was also in IHSA in the last 5 years. I think personal experiences can vary wildly depending on what region you're in. The teams in mine were always super supportive of each other (except for one) and the majority were clubs. It makes me sad that some teams can be so catty. My coach squashed that behavior as soon as it arose.

                                    She also made sure that each person's record was perfectly checked, even the people with spotty lesson histories. She wouldn't take the chance. One story she told us was a NY team that won Zones and was on its way to Nationals when it was found that one of their riders (not a Zones or Nationals rider) should have been placed in a division higher. The whole team was dq'd before they even got there.

                                    Comment


                                      Not all ISHA teams are created equal. There are good ones and bad ones. I do agree they are a great jumping off point for many people.

                                      Comment


                                        I knew an IHSA coach some years back who would regularly need to round up new riders throughout the season as her walk-trot riders would win enough to no longer be eligible for those classes. She would walk up to students and ask if they had ever wanted to ride a horse. If they said yes, they got the chance to ride and show if it all worked out. So there are places where they do follow the eligibility rules.

                                        Comment


                                          Originally posted by initiate1987 View Post

                                          I was also in IHSA in the last 5 years. I think personal experiences can vary wildly depending on what region you're in. The teams in mine were always super supportive of each other (except for one) and the majority were clubs. It makes me sad that some teams can be so catty. My coach squashed that behavior as soon as it arose.

                                          She also made sure that each person's record was perfectly checked, even the people with spotty lesson histories. She wouldn't take the chance. One story she told us was a NY team that won Zones and was on its way to Nationals when it was found that one of their riders (not a Zones or Nationals rider) should have been placed in a division higher. The whole team was dq'd before they even got there.
                                          So I was in IHSA 10 + years ago now. My freshman year our team lost in a tie breaker at Zones only to find out the girl in novice fences from the winning team had lied on her paperwork (claimed a trainer showed her horse when it was really her that showed the horse) and she was not eligible to be in novice, she should have been higher. Her team was DQ'd at nationals and we got the phone call while nationals were occurring and scrambled a team together and drove out. We could only send competitors for the divisions that had not shown yet but yeah, people take that seriously. If your team or an individual are particularly competitive, they better be placed correctly. If someone had a walk trot rider who clearly had no business being in walk trot, questions would be asked.

                                          I will also say the team I was on was not super welcoming, lots of entitled personalities on the team with unrealistic demands of what should be available to them in a club sport. So if you were not a dedicated horse person already, I probably would not have waded into that quagmire (or stayed long). On a related note, we had trouble finding and retaining walk trot riders...hmm...

                                          Ten years later I believe that team is in a much better place as it found solid footing in both barn and coaching and I think that has made a world of difference for them. Kids I know in their program now seem very happy.

                                          Comment

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