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When looking for a prospect, which would you pick?

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  • #21
    I don't know if people mentioned this but the one thing about Baby that makes it affordable is your friend willing to board it cheaply. Can you support it if you have a falling out and have to pay real board? BTDT
    www.abacusfurniture.com

    Bit Chair: https://www.instagram.com/p/BNfIUYig...bacusfurniture

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    • #22
      I think if you put the carry costs over 4 years into an account (and really commit to putting that money in every month) you would have a relatively decent budget for an older green WB.

      My gelding's career ended due to injury, so I put the training and shoeing bills into an account ($900 month saved) and kept enjoying him however I could. When you factor in body clipping and the savings on show fees, it really added up! I was able to buy a lovely green who was far enough along to skip 3' greens and go to 3'3". I'm so happy I waited it out. When my horse had a horrific colic episode last year and I lost him unexpectedly, I had the savings I needed for his cremation and I was able to move forward with my new horse after a relatively brief search. He's insured so if anything happens at least I'm covered. With a foal, anything can happen. Injury, OCD, etc... When you add up the costs of carrying that foal, plus insurance, it may be worthwhile to wait and save and buy something that is already proven to do the job, even if its somewhat green at it.

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      • #23
        Originally posted by Against*All*Odds View Post
        I don't know if people mentioned this but the one thing about Baby that makes it affordable is your friend willing to board it cheaply. Can you support it if you have a falling out and have to pay real board? BTDT

        Yup! The breeder offers this for anyone that buys a foal/youngster from them so it’s their general policy. Good point though!
        "And my good dreams? They all come with a velvet muzzle and four legs. All my good dreams are about horses."--In Colt Blood

        COTH Barn Rats Clique!

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        • #24
          Originally posted by StormyDay View Post
          Baby WB for me too. I’ve had bad lameness issues with TBs and have yet to meet one who didn’t have something wrong. Sweet horses but I feel they got the short straw genetics wise and many people can’t afford to have a horse sit in a field their whole life.
          As someone who owns both....WB are not immune to soundness issues. I have two well bred ones that will never be more than pets. Honestly....I’ve had more soundness issues with the WBs than with the TBs....but really, horses in general just try and break.

          Personally....I’d save until you can afford a more going horse. A project horse is going to be a risk no matter what the breed.
          ** Tact is the ability to tell someone to go to hell in such a way that they look forward to the trip. ~Winston Churchill? **

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          • #25
            I went baby wb. He fell into my lap and it was meant to be. My first horse was a sport bred TB mare. I loved her but I was tired of a lifetime of saying "Whoa, easy". I was ready got a change. So I got a just turned 2 yr old by Romantic Star, a Hanoverian stallion out of a huge appendix mare. I thought he was beautiful at 2, but he is *stunning* at almost 7. Hes been a dreamboat. Trained him 100% myself I knew I would never be able to afford a 7 yr old wb like him so this was perfect for me. I think a wb will generally have a better resale value if that is a factor. I also liked that I had control over how fast (rather; SLOW) he was started.
            http://www.facebook.com/pages/Fentre...24774504235082

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            • #26
              Originally posted by bornfreenowexpensive View Post

              As someone who owns both....WB are not immune to soundness issues. I have two well bred ones that will never be more than pets. Honestly....I’ve had more soundness issues with the WBs than with the TBs....but really, horses in general just try and break.

              Personally....I’d save until you can afford a more going horse. A project horse is going to be a risk no matter what the breed.
              Definitely not immune but just in my experience, WBs tend to break less. OTTBS aren’t bred for longevity and unless you get one who never went to the track, started too young. I have not met a single one who went to the track who didn’t have some sort of arthritis at a young age. Usually totally manageable but still not great when they are seven and have hock and stifle arthritis.

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              • #27
                Honestly have no real advice for you, just chuckling as I was in a similar scenario last fall. I lost my big mare, and I have enough to ride that don't belong to me that I was left to decide: get something rideable now (likely OTTB), or buy a baby and wait some time. Similar budgeting concerns etc.

                So I decided on baby. And I decided, "hey, since I'm waiting anyway and have lots to ride, I'll save my pennies and buy a really NICE baby." I was so committed to my path. Have had so many rehab projects and "undo the bad crap and find the nice horse underneath" situations. A blanks slate, I said. That's what I want!

                And then I went to lunch with a friend who said "so are you looking for another horse?" to which I foolishly replied "well, noooo, but you know? Sometimes the right equine just comes into your life so who knows!"

                So anyway that's the story of how my committed plan to save for a blank slate lasted... ooooh 45 days. And now I have a 7 y/o rehab project But he's pretty amazing and WELL above my pay grade so it's working out!

                As far as advice? Just send your intention for a new equine into the world. Sometimes the right one finds you

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by kashmere View Post
                  Honestly have no real advice for you, just chuckling as I was in a similar scenario last fall. I lost my big mare, and I have enough to ride that don't belong to me that I was left to decide: get something rideable now (likely OTTB), or buy a baby and wait some time. Similar budgeting concerns etc.

                  So I decided on baby. And I decided, "hey, since I'm waiting anyway and have lots to ride, I'll save my pennies and buy a really NICE baby." I was so committed to my path. Have had so many rehab projects and "undo the bad crap and find the nice horse underneath" situations. A blanks slate, I said. That's what I want!

                  And then I went to lunch with a friend who said "so are you looking for another horse?" to which I foolishly replied "well, noooo, but you know? Sometimes the right equine just comes into your life so who knows!"

                  So anyway that's the story of how my committed plan to save for a blank slate lasted... ooooh 45 days. And now I have a 7 y/o rehab project But he's pretty amazing and WELL above my pay grade so it's working out!

                  As far as advice? Just send your intention for a new equine into the world. Sometimes the right one finds you

                  Great advice!
                  "And my good dreams? They all come with a velvet muzzle and four legs. All my good dreams are about horses."--In Colt Blood

                  COTH Barn Rats Clique!

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                  • #29
                    I have done both and have had great results. It really depends on the individual horse. When my mare was about 7 I bought a reallllllyyyyy fancy young colt because my mom and I wanted a project we could bring along together. I wasn't sure how my timeline was going to work our because I knew my boy would be ready to start before my mare was ready for a new job, but I'm good with winging it. I board one horse and my parents have a farm a few hours away, so the colt went there. 2 years ago my mare was coming off of a rehab and injured herself AGAIN. My young horse was only 2. We decided to breed my (extremely lovely and well bred) mare and throw her in the pasture for a year. My baby horse wasn't ready to get started, so I ended up buying an OTTB from KY and shipping him east. I chose an attractive, sound, quiet bay gelding. He's one of the best choices I've ever made. He was supposed to be a re-sell project, but I made the mistake of falling in love with him. He's easy to love. Now he is out on lease and I am preparing to start my young horse. If my only horse right now was my OTTB, I'd be perfectly happy with that. If my only horse right now was my young horse, I'd be perfectly happy with that. Instead, I've got 4 .


                    So, check out the babies and see if you like them. You can also get a nice OTTB for a great price right now. I got mine from Amy Lynn Paulus and highly recommend her, she knows good horses. Jessica Redman also has some REALLY LOVELY OTTBs and I know people who have had great experiences with her.

                    For the record, I bought my WB gelding to be my AO hunter, but I was doing the local circuit with my OTTB and enjoyed that immensely as well. We have a nice local circuit in my area. So my ambition is not as high as it once was.

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                    • #30
                      Originally posted by StormyDay View Post

                      Definitely not immune but just in my experience, WBs tend to break less. OTTBS aren’t bred for longevity and unless you get one who never went to the track, started too young. I have not met a single one who went to the track who didn’t have some sort of arthritis at a young age. Usually totally manageable but still not great when they are seven and have hock and stifle arthritis.
                      Then you have limited exposure. I’ve had many very sound OTTBs who raced (more than 10 starts). I had horses for over 40 years (own more than 20 right now). In my experience the WBs break more. But that is a huge generalization. It really is NOT bred related.
                      ** Tact is the ability to tell someone to go to hell in such a way that they look forward to the trip. ~Winston Churchill? **

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                      • #31
                        Originally posted by Pokerface View Post
                        Instead, I've got 4 .
                        That has happened to me. I was about ready to name the next one Potato Chip.
                        The cue card kid just held up an empty cue card. For a minute there I thought I had lost my sense of humor. --- Red Skelton

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                        • #32
                          Originally posted by pony grandma View Post

                          That has happened to me. I was about ready to name the next one Potato Chip.
                          No kidding . People keep asking if I will breed my mare again. Um, not any time soon... I bred a chestnut mare and got a chestnut mare out of it . Good thing I get along just great with chestnut mares because they are half of my herd!

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                          • #33
                            Originally posted by Pokerface View Post

                            No kidding . People keep asking if I will breed my mare again. Um, not any time soon... I bred a chestnut mare and got a chestnut mare out of it . Good thing I get along just great with chestnut mares because they are half of my herd!
                            Too funny! My current mare is a big chestnut mare as well! She can be tough and is not an easy ride but is a lot of fun!
                            "And my good dreams? They all come with a velvet muzzle and four legs. All my good dreams are about horses."--In Colt Blood

                            COTH Barn Rats Clique!

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                            • #34
                              Originally posted by bornfreenowexpensive View Post

                              Then you have limited exposure. I’ve had many very sound OTTBs who raced (more than 10 starts). I had horses for over 40 years (own more than 20 right now). In my experience the WBs break more. But that is a huge generalization. It really is NOT bred related.
                              Well than you have had better luck than me and those around me. I’ve been around a lot of OTTBS. Glad you’ve had better luck.

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                              • #35
                                Originally posted by StormyDay View Post

                                Well than you have had better luck than me and those around me. I’ve been around a lot of OTTBS. Glad you’ve had better luck.
                                It’s not about luck. It’s about knowing what to look for....and it is not always buying the cheap or free ones. In all honestly...most good OTTBs were a LOT more expensive to get on the ground and produce than any warmbloods. I breed warmbloods be cause I cannot afford to breed TBs! But you have to know who are good trainers and good breeders. I’ve gotten several very nice OTTBs directly from their breeders who owned and raced them. Others I’ve gotten through connections that I have and a few I’ve gotten from very good re-sellers who know their connections.

                                I’ve bred many warmbloods as well and known just as many. They go just as lame as any OTTB. . Just when people have lame warmbloods...they don’t blame it on being a warmblood.....just like chestnut mares....when people have a crazy bay gelding...they don’t blame it on their sex and color like they do with chestnut mares. Yes...there are many damaged OTTBs....I’ve rescued a few of those too. Ones I wanted to make sure had a soft landing after they were wrecked at the track. I’ve also seen wrecked WB and other breeds. Unfortunately....its horses and lack of horsemanship.


                                For the OP....a very well known and good horseman said to me...don’t get attached to the young horses until they live past the age of 6. This was very sage advice. Yes...you can buy a youngster....and honestly it is rewarding to ride a horse that you have raised...but they can break your heart too.
                                Last edited by bornfreenowexpensive; Mar. 21, 2020, 08:15 PM.
                                ** Tact is the ability to tell someone to go to hell in such a way that they look forward to the trip. ~Winston Churchill? **

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                                • #36
                                  I'm going to go with others who have touched on option C, which is setting aside the $$ you have right now, and then each month adding to it what you would have spent on board, farrier, vet, training, gas driving to the barn, etc. By the time that imaginary yearling turned 3 you would have a nice nest egg in the bank to buy something a little further along.

                                  You can, of course, keep your eyes open for a TB or a diamond in the rough as your money is accumulating. The problem with TBs is that there are a lot of them that are not suitable for modern h/j disciplines and they are hard to re-sell, often selling for a fraction of what they would be worth if they were a WB. However, I think at least you can see what type of adult horse you have at the time of purchase.

                                  As far as buying a young WB, a lot can go wrong. Even a gorgeous yearling can turn out to need OCD surgery or have a soundness issue. Also, young horses are individuals. Some are gonna grow up to have quirks, some are going to grow up to have slightly different talents or personality traits than what you hoped. I know a LOT of people who have gone this route, investing a lot into raising a special yearling only at the end of the day the horse is just not the specific horse they wanted, lacking the particular talent, suitability, or personality (or soundness level) that they had hoped for. Also, getting young horses started under saddle can be a PITA for someone who owns just a single youngster. I get it that the process seems fun on the outside, and if you genuinely want to experience the process, go for it. Just be aware that financially it is a better deal to buy something further along.

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                                  • #37
                                    Fun thread! A friend of mine and I were both looking for a new horse. I saved for years and got a perfect young 3 year old WB. My friend was open to any good horse and after trying many, wound up with a TB who is the love of her life. I love my new horse too, but had to spend more than expected in training, while her horse is jumping well now and can take her over courses. TBs can be fantastic, but so are young warmbloods. I personally would not get one less than 3, because too much could happen.

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