Sport Horse Spotlight

Zucchero Gold - Wandres, Frederic - 838-BC18_REU2723-foto_reumann

Real Estate Spotlight

Sale Spotlight

COTH_without Subscribe
  • Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You�re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the Forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it�details of personal disputes may be better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts, though are not legally obligated to do so, regardless of content.

Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting. Moderators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts unless they have been alerted and have determined that a post, thread or user has violated the Forums� policies. Moderators do not regularly independently monitor the Forums for such violations.

Profanity, outright vulgarity, blatant personal insults or otherwise inappropriate statements will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

Users may provide their positive or negative experiences with or opinions of companies, products, individuals, etc.; however, accounts involving allegations of criminal behavior against named individuals or companies MUST be first-hand accounts and may NOT be made anonymously.

If a situation has been reported upon by a reputable news source or addressed by law enforcement or the legal system it is open for discussion, but if an individual wants to make their own claims of criminal behavior against a named party in the course of that discussion, they too must identify themselves by first and last name and the account must be first-person.

Criminal allegations that do not satisfy these requirements, when brought to our attention, may be removed pending satisfaction of these criteria, and we reserve the right to err on the side of caution when making these determinations.

Credible threats of suicide will be reported to the police along with identifying user information at our disposal, in addition to referring the user to suicide helpline resources such as 1-800-SUICIDE or 1-800-273-TALK.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it�s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users� profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses � Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it�s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who�s selling it, it doesn�t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions � Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services � Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products � While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements � Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be �bumped� excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues � Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators� discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the �alert� button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your �Ignore� list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you�d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user�s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 5/9/18)
See more
See less

How to let a client go, or maybe not

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How to let a client go, or maybe not

    I posted this in the H/J forum, but I suppose it could really apply to any discipline or training program.

    As a trainer, at what point do you draw the line and politely "fire" or set a boundary of "we need to follow a program for your safety or I cannot teach you" for a client who trailers in for lessons? And how do you go about letting said client go? Written letter? Say your program is now full with consistent students? Firm conversation? Where would you go with this as a fellow professional? My intent is not to burn bridges or tick people off, but truly from a safety standpoint (and reputation as well-this is not a match I ever would have suggested and the "training" and riding is not a reflection of how my program runs since they only lesson occasionally.) I apologize in advance for the book I have typed below...

    Basic story: teen client took lessons consistently on a school horse for a few months, and was doing well wtc jumping xrails and some 2' fences and had a couple horses at home who weren't suitable for jumping. Family is very involved and has lots of opinions but not a high level of horse sense or horsemanship.

    One horse was sold (not through me; I don't market horses for the discipline this horse did, so I felt my sales services wouldnt have benefitted them, although I helped them formulate the ad) and they actively started looking for another horse. I offered suitable lease horses so the teen could get some more experience under her belt in this discipline before getting a green horse; they wanted to purchase. I offered sales consultations, discussed at length why it is beneficial to take a trainer, and sent my contract along. Also offered that I knew of many suitable horses we could try within the area and even had one for sale in barn that we could try in a lesson, even just to see if a young tb was something she would be capable on (my sale horse was quiet and coursing 2'3" and is already used for some advanced lessons) Contract was never signed although numerous random sale videos of unsuitable horses (for this rider and her goals) were sent to me, which I offered to give my opinion on at my hourly lesson rate or at the start of her next lesson (during lesson time). Family ignored this offer. Teen was also offered working student hours in my program; work in the barn, learn something, earn hours towards an extra lesson. Was told that teens time would be better spent at home with new horse when they bought one. This rider does not know much in the way of horsemanship.

    Anyway, All suggestions were ignored, and a very young, very green horse was quickly purchased without a pre purchase exam from a tb placement agency. A comment was made by the parents how much they trusted the agency. I am unsure of how much family fibbed about "being in my program" (they lesson 1x a week and do not board with me, and didnt have any plans to put this horse in training with me to my knowledge) or what kind of a tb agency would place a very green horse with a young green rider.

    Rider asks to trailer in for a lesson with new horse. Surprise to me; did not know they bought a horse!. Rider and family and horse show up, and I ask details on horse. How old/when did he race last/when was he gelded/any injuries/ how much off track training did he receive at the placement agency etc...the answers were not positive considering rider is a young teen jumping 2' on a good day with a patient, responsive school horse.

    Horse is under 4, had some sort of unknown ankle/fetlock fracture, unsure when gelded, had a year of healing/let down, but no current rads or pre purchase, rider was not permitted to ride him when they went to see him (I was not present or aware of this visit) so she had not yet sat on horse although they watched someone at tb placement agency ride him that day. They had also had him less than a week at this point.

    The saddle they purchased did not fit him or child at all, bridle was suitable (I offered to help them measure for a tree size/give number of several saddle fitters/etc...they went and bought a brand new cheap saddle from the local tack store without measuring him or rider, which sits on his withers.

    Moving on...I opted to lunge him because rider did not know how or the benefits of lunging and he is a)young, hot, and green as grass. B)wanted to see soundness and c) frankly a bit dangerous on the ground and am past the point in life of risking my neck unneccesarily. Also, the saddle issue.

    it is worth mentioning as well that Rider and family adore a certain famous natural horsemanship trainer whose practices I do not agree with and said that is the plan they wanted to follow with groundwork. I had voiced that videos are great, but not a substitute for a live trainer with a consistent program in this situation.

    While tacking, young hot tb proceeded to act like a young green unmannered tb does...pawing, biting, distracted, (also tried to kick me when I asked him to not smash me against the side of the trailer) etc. Child and family look at him in horror. "He was so sweet at home" they say.

    We lunged, and worked a bit on the ground and honestly I would love to take this cute guy on as a project for myself but he is 100% not suitable for this young rider. Ended up lunging ok for child after I worked with him for about 30 min but she had never lunged before and I was right behind her helping. He is very weak, and for whatever reasons, whether weakness, balance, greenness, or any plethora of reasons, never showed a true canter, both directions volunteered to cross canter, although at this point, this is just another thing to add to the laundry list of worries.

    I didnt hear from rider or family for a couple months and now they are asking for a lesson. I try to accommodate all levels to the extent that I can and offer a safe, positive learning environment, but I feel that I cant offer that for this rider with this horse, since the family has refused to take advice or suggestion time and time again. We run a high-quality program and I tailor my lessons to what each horse and rider need, but at the end of the day, I am frankly more interested in teaching clients who listen to my advice.

    I do not want this rider (or horse!) having an accident at my facility because they chose to do their own thing every time and schedule lessons inconsistently. At what point do I draw the line and refuse to teach the child? For me, this answer doesnt help the horse or rider, but I am also not interested in talking to deaf ears anymore. I hate to give an ultimatum but would like to sit down and have a conversation about committing to a program(any program! Whether it be 1x a week with homework or 5days a week) for the sake of the horse and the safety of their child or that maybe they would be better suited to another trainers program.

  • #2
    As a trainer who has been in a very similar situation with a young teen who purchased a totally unsuitable 3 year old off the track without any guidance, I think the best move is to tell them either in person or on the phone, as tactfully as possible, exactly what you laid out in your post.

    I don't think it's really an "ultimatum" to explain to your clients that for the safety of all parties, you need a commitment to being in a program to continue teaching her.

    I was in more or less the same situation (right down to the youtube trainer and ill-fitting saddle) and the teen in question eventually decided to sell the horse and it ended up with me as a project, although as a side note I would be wary of taking on a project without a thorough PPE.

    If the parents called you to arrange a lesson, they are seeking your professional opinion and you shouldn't feel guilty about letting them go if they can't agree to the terms you set, although of course having been in this situation I know that is easier said than done!

    Best of luck and hopefully the parents realize they are overfaced with this horse and agree to work with you on your terms.

    Comment


    • #3
      I feel for you.

      Only because you said you thought you would like to take him on as a project horse, you might put in writing that at this point of time unless the horse is kept at your place and put into training with teen still having lessons on the school horse, until you think it is safe for her to get on him, you suggest they find another trainer.

      You could have a talk with them first. You never know a neighbour or other family person might have stepped in and they may have been riding him and may have a different partnership to what you saw, but like you I doubt that.
      It is better to ride 5 minutes a day than it is to ride 35 minutes on a Sunday.

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #4
        Originally posted by rideoff View Post
        As a trainer who has been in a very similar situation with a young teen who purchased a totally unsuitable 3 year old off the track without any guidance, I think the best move is to tell them either in person or on the phone, as tactfully as possible, exactly what you laid out in your post.

        I don't think it's really an "ultimatum" to explain to your clients that for the safety of all parties, you need a commitment to being in a program to continue teaching her.

        I was in more or less the same situation (right down to the youtube trainer and ill-fitting saddle) and the teen in question eventually decided to sell the horse and it ended up with me as a project, although as a side note I would be wary of taking on a project without a thorough PPE.

        If the parents called you to arrange a lesson, they are seeking your professional opinion and you shouldn't feel guilty about letting them go if they can't agree to the terms you set, although of course having been in this situation I know that is easier said than done!

        Best of luck and hopefully the parents realize they are overfaced with this horse and agree to work with you on your terms.
        Thank you, I appreciate the input! I probably should have mentioned, although he is the TYPE I would enjoy, after hearing what I did about his fracture and dad saying "oh he had his ankles cleaned out" (what?!) With no vet records, I wouldnt touch him with a 10 foot pole. And wouldnt accept him into my sales program without a thorough prepurchase prior either!

        Comment


        • #5
          It is quite reasonable to "fire" a client or refuse business from a client that isn't fitting in with your program. At what point "firing" a client is the best solution, is really up to you.

          One thing I would suggest is to be very clear with the client why the relationship isn't working and under what circumstances it could work. For example, if the problem is the lack of a program, then explain why a lack of a program is an issue (safety, professional reputation, inability to produce consistent results, etc.) and suggest that if they decide they can commit to a program of lessoning 1x a week (for example), you would be able to help them.

          It makes perfect sense to have this conversation in person, but if you are leaving the door open for them to remain a client (or come back as a client) if certain objectives are met, I would consider detailing the criteria in a follow-up e-mail. Sometimes people hear one thing during a "live" conversation but will better comprehend the totality of the issue if there is something written down for future reference.

          I suspect you'll breathe a sign of relief after you have "the talk" and wonder why you didn't do it sooner. Best of luck!

          Comment


          • #6
            Having had these clients back when I did such a thing, go ahead and fire. It most likely will not change and they (parents or children or both) will consistently not listen, go behind your back to other trainers/training methods/sales barns, and will not magically become regular, appreciative, paying clients of your program

            At the best, they will listen, comprehend, and understand your concerns and either request you work with child on school horses while she "works with" the new horse, will ask you to work with both, or ask you to work with green horse and child separately but still not want to address to green horse issue, and someone might get hurt. At the worse, you will have the talk and they will either commit to the plan while backdooring you to other trainers to find the opinion and answer they want (or come on COTH and do it ) or bad talk you for various whatever reasons, such as you only want sales commissions and won't help people who help themselves, you have an agenda, you're taking advantage, etc.

            Explain that you have a program, that during their months' absence your client list had filled, that you are focusing on those with clear goals who accept trainer feedback and value trainer experience and expertise, and that at this time you had already cleared them from your client list and do not have room.
            COTH's official mini-donk enabler

            "I am all for reaching out, but in some situations it needs to be done with a rolled up news paper." Alagirl

            Comment


            • #7
              Say you'll take them, but only on a prepaid contract of at least four interactions per week.
              The Noodlehttp://tiny.cc/NGKmT&http://tiny.cc/gioSA
              Jinxyhttp://tiny.cc/PIC798&http://tiny.cc/jinx364
              Boy Wonderhttp://tiny.cc/G9290
              The Hana is nuts! NUTS!!http://tinyurl.com/SOCRAZY

              Comment


              • #8
                The easy way out is a white lie: "Great to hear from you, but I'm full up with clients. Sorry I can't help. Best wishes with your project gelding."


                The more professional way is to tell a kind form of the truth: "I can't help you with this young, green horse in a way that will be good for him or for you as a haul-in client. I am truly sorry. I hope you can find the right pro to help you."

                You can add information or helpful advice on to that as you think will be half-way well-received and productive. If your main goal is to extricate yourself from these clients, you don't need to bother. If you do want to help them on the next phase of their journey, make helpful suggestions about what kind of training they will need or who in the area you would refer them to.

                That is the bottom line, right? You don't think you can keep the kid safe. That's bad for the horse, too, since he'll get dumped after the kid does. You might be able to make this horse suitable for the kid some day, if he were in full training (and also a whole bunch of other things about this family were to change). But as things stand now, they are trying to hire you to do a job you can't do. So you aren't firing them so much as you are not taking the job they have offered you.

                I have had a client like this and I got myself fired in a way that was OK in the end (since, like you, I really didn't want the impending accident to happen on my watch). But I could have done better and had the client not leave on bad terms. That's how I learned what I would do differently next time. The "bad terms" thing was my fault for finally, one day, "taking my client's inventory" about all the stuff she had done wrong in buying the super-green (but saintly) horse she did after we discussed what it would be like if she did that and how much time and money she'd spend in training in order to feel safe on him.
                The armchair saddler
                Politically Pro-Cat

                Comment


                • #9
                  They didn’t contact you for a couple of months and then called for a lesson? Agree with mvp, sorry, my schedule is full and I cannot take on any more.

                  This is absolutely not going to end well for you if you keep them as clients. And they will be a time and energy suck. Time and energy that could be spent on those that are active participants in your program.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    If you are still okay/willing to work with the girl and horse.. I would just tell the family you require a once a week commitment to continue lessoning with you. Charge a months worth of lessons at the beginning of the month.

                    If they dont want to do that (which it sounds like they dont)... then your not the bad guy, its their decision.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Agree that you and the client should part ways --lots of good advice here. On a side note, a girl in our 4-H club did a similar action --bought an OTTB from a woman who picked such horses up from the track --no retraining --after a couple of years, the girl --who was a nice, kind girl, but whole family was in over their heads --no horse experience --asked my daughter to work with the horse and sell it. (DD was a 3-Day rider). We looked at the horse and decided to do. We cured the basic issues (wouldn't load,wouldn't stand) and DD decided to keep the horse (we paid what they asked). After 5 years and making it to Intermediate level --DD entered law school. At that point she sold the horse and paid for the first year with the purchase price. So while the current situation is probably not workable, these things have a way of resolving ---oh, the girl? Never did get another horse, but did follow DD into law school!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        From what you are saying, even with a program, this is an unsafe horse for this child. There may be a soundness issue, which, coupled with expected greenness and what may be his natural temperament, might mean that even with regular training from you, it might be difficult to correct the horse's issues.

                        If the horse was relatively sound, and since you like him, I'd suggest asking to board the horse for a bit at your place and give him constant, correct training. Without him being there, it sounds like any training you give him while working with the family will be untrained at home. The family sounds like it has poor listening skills (to put it politely).

                        I don't think the horse sounds dangerous, but it does sound like a dangerous situation, and even if it might not do any good, for my own peace of mind I would tactfully but strongly communicate the risks and what you think the family should do, based on your professional opinion.
                        Check out the latest Fortune's Fool novel, Courage to the Sticking Place!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Do you have a stall for this horse? If you do, why not say you would love to work with them but he needs 60 days of consistent work with you in order to get anything out of lessons. He sounds like he needs fitness before anything else. They will likely say no but they may say yes. And then you can truly help the horse.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Agree that you and the client should part ways --lots of good advice here. On a side note, a girl in our 4-H club did a similar action --bought an OTTB from a woman who picked such horses up from the track --no retraining --after a couple of years, the girl --who was a nice, kind girl, but whole family was in over their heads --no horse experience --asked my daughter to work with the horse and sell it. (DD was a 3-Day rider). We looked at the horse and decided to do. We cured the basic issues (wouldn't load,wouldn't stand) and DD decided to keep the horse (we paid what they asked). After 5 years and making it to Intermediate level --DD entered law school. At that point she sold the horse and paid for the first year with the purchase price. So while the current situation is probably not workable, these things have a way of resolving ---oh, the girl? Never did get another horse, but did follow DD into law school!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              My first thought is "They are just not that in to you" It sounds like they came to you for some superficial lessons that they perceive enough for her to proceed forward on her own.

                              They clearly do not respect you nor your professional status. I am willing to bet they defend their choices and roads by saying professionals are only in it for the money.

                              I would write a letter proposing what you feel is needed for the health and safety of all involved. Include a stipulation of a vet exam and evaluation of the old injury. This is an issue of safety and animal welfare. If they want to get on board, after they see your well worded plan, thats great, if not then good luck in your journey with this horse.

                              I would not suggest other professionals to help them.
                              _\\]
                              -- * > hoopoe
                              Procrastinate NOW
                              Introverted Since 1957

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Great post by MVP. And this is a client, that if you "let" them go, I would not suggest other professionals, so as not to put your trainer friends in the same boat. This, so far, is the type of family that is uneducable. Some stay that way. They may come back around after learning the very hard way. And yes, they clearly do not respect you or your professional status. Frankly, that is a hard one to get past. And, that old saying is so often true - green horse black and blue rider.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Do you regularly take ship in lessons? This feels like they aren't going to listen to your advice so I would offer them boarding and lessons but no more ship in lessons. That will likely send them on their way
                                  "You can't really debate with someone who has a prescient invisible friend"
                                  carolprudm

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by Classic View Post
                                    Great post by MVP. And this is a client, that if you "let" them go, I would not suggest other professionals, so as not to put your trainer friends in the same boat. This, so far, is the type of family that is uneducable. Some stay that way. They may come back around after learning the very hard way. And yes, they clearly do not respect you or your professional status. Frankly, that is a hard one to get past. And, that old saying is so often true - green horse black and blue rider.
                                    OP, the bolded part was something I thought of after I posted and it's something that my own experience taught me.

                                    Looking back, I could see all the signs that my "I'll do it my way.... and hire you do to it my way" client would not be educable enough by me in the time I'd know her. I think she had come some distance from her first decision to get back into horses as an adult. And we spent a lot of time talking about what to expect or how to look for a horse before she bought the one she did (foregoing a PPE). So I thought she'd be a the "normal degree" of new client who was paying me to help her improve her horsemanship from what she had.

                                    But what I saw instead was someone who didn't want to keep improving, but who had just about reached her limit of what kind of effort, money and commitment she wanted to put into horse ownership. I will think about this more and see if I can see any further signs of someone who had hired a pro and bought a horse in order to "get to the next level of owning the project horse" versus "buying the project horse as a basis for continuing on."

                                    The one thing my client had in common with your family is that they saw the purchasing a horse as the quickest way to getting to some goal. Like you, I tried to find a horse for my client to lease and explained why this was an awesome idea (i.e.-- the horse you need now will not be the horse you need in 2 years). But she really wanted to own whatever horse she put effort and money into. A minute later, she realized she was scared of her (saintly) green horse and wanted to sell him ASAP and probably quit riding.

                                    I think the folks who insist on getting to a big goal like buying their own greenie and who ditch professional help exactly at the point they need it most are uneducable. Maybe they will not be so forever, but if they have turned down all good (and life-saving) advice so far, you have to get out of the way and let them learn for themselves. And who knows? Maybe when the young horse is "bad" and gets sent to a cowboy to get fixed, their experience plus that guy will be able to educate them.

                                    Teach who you can, where you can. But if the student is not ready, get out of the way so that they can learn when and how they will. That's not your business; you can only offer the best you have.

                                    The armchair saddler
                                    Politically Pro-Cat

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      You mentioned not wanting to burn bridges, but what bridge/where does it lead with these folks? It sounds like a bridge that needs to be burned, for your reputation. I've moved around a lot, and at different boarding barns, I've seen these people. With the parents telling the child they know better, and the famous NH person likely badmouthing any legit training as abusive or unenlightened, I'm not sure how you break through. Most reputable TB places will offer returns on mismatches - if they are struggling, that could be an option??? I am mainly worried for the poor horse. I love OTTBs and most aren't that bad, but need a knowledgeable person to help them adjust/learn. Sadly, when they are cheap, they can end up in bad hands.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        This is an easy one. Don't let the rider get on the horse until the horse is standing quietly and calmly.

                                        95% of the original post was about how the client did not take the trainer's advice, and the horse is not suitable for the rider, and very little about how the trainer would go about working with this horse. Most competent trainers realize that you work with the horse you have that day. I have absolutely no problem working on the ground with a horse until the horse is in the frame of mind that I can safely get on. Sounds like the OP is willing to skip these steps and let the client dictate what happens. I'd be showing the client how to get the horse to calm down and stand still so he can be tacked and mounted. Once the hour is up, the hour is up regardless of how much time is spent (or not) in the saddle. Or even if the saddle made it to the horse's back. If the client is displeased with the amount of riding time, they can fire the trainer. His soundness issues are not the trainer's business.

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X