Sport Horse Spotlight

Real Estate Spotlight

JR-1

Sale Spotlight

  • Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Depo-Provera added to Forbidden Substances list for USEF effective Dec 1, 2019

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Depo-Provera added to Forbidden Substances list for USEF effective Dec 1, 2019

    http://links.usef.mkt7856.com/servle...MAS2&mt=1&rt=0

    Lexington, Ky. - The United States Equestrian Federation (USEF) Board of Directors has voted to prohibit the use of Medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) in horses competing in USEF-licensed competitions effective December 1, 2019.



    In early 2017, USEF convened a panel of industry experts to review MPA and its use in horses competing at USEF-licensed competitions. The MPA Panel (Panel) held a workshop and a town hall meeting to gather feedback from members and veterinarians and subsequently met to review research and drug studies. The result of data analysis led to the Panel’s recommendation to require disclosure of MPA administration in competition horses. The USEF Board of Directors voted to approve the Panel’s recommendation, and the requirement to submit an MPA Disclosure Form for any horse receiving administration of MPA while competing at a USEF-licensed competition became effective September 1, 2017. Since that date, pharmacokinetic data related to MPA administration has been collected and analyzed.



    On October 22, 2019, following reports of equine fatalities and anaphylaxis related to the use of MPA, USEF’s MPA Panel met to further analyze the use of MPA in horses competing at USEF-licensed competitions. The Panel reviewed a recent petition by numerous veterinarians requesting that USEF ban the use of MPA which was supported by documentation citing 23 fatalities associated with MPA use over the last three years, research on the efficacy of the substance, and the results from the collection of MPA medication reports.



    The Panel determined MPA has no therapeutic use in competition horses, as it does not interrupt estrus in mares, which predicated its original use. Additionally, MPA is not approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in equines and its use has been reported and documented to be associated with several cases of anaphylaxis and fatality. As a result of this analysis, the Panel voted unanimously to recommend MPA is added to the list of USEF prohibited substances.



    “In 2017, we debated the use of this substance and its efficacy, but now, with numerous fatalities associated with the use of MPA, this decision became clear: MPA must be banned,” said USEF President Murray Kessler. “I commend the Panel for confronting a difficult task that involved very strong opinions on both sides of the issue from our membership. The information clearly supports the prohibition of this substance and I am proud of the decision of the Board of Directors. USEF has a responsibility to ensure the welfare of our horses, and the loss of one horse resulting from the use of a non-therapeutic substance such as MPA is one too many.”



    The Panel stressed that in addition to providing the reasons supporting their recommendation, the prohibition of the use of MPA must be enacted as quickly as possible. Starting December 1, 2019, MPA in horses competing at USEF-licensed competitions will be prohibited. However, due to the length of time involved for MPA to clear a horse’s system, sanctions for a positive test result will begin on June 1, 2020. The USEF has classified MPA as a Category III substance which has a penalty range starting at a 3-6 month suspension and a fine of $3,000-$6,000 for a first offense.
    "Courage is not the absence of fear but rather the judgment that something is more important than fear. The brave may not live forever but the cautious do not live at all." ~2001 The Princess Diaries

  • #2
    I'm Just... Well I don't know right now.

    Little Mare is maintained on depo for TURNOUT behavioral issues. She's spicy under saddle, and as a jumper, I like that. So I guess I'll be looking for alternatives.

    Comment


    • #3
      About time.

      Comment


      • #4
        Eh. It's banned where I'm at (I know, irrelevant) and no one is really fussing around here, but maybe because it's old news. And less people use it over here it seems. But that's purely based off of what I read on these forums and what I experience in my local radius. So, just anecdotal.

        I do think some drugs are overused, but I do support managing a horse with severe hormonal issues with medication/drugs as a last effort. Very last effort. Given the anaphylaxis risk
        Last edited by CanteringCarrot; Nov. 13, 2019, 03:15 PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Good news!

          Comment


          • #6
            I think in the big scheme of things, this is good news!

            Comment

            • Original Poster

              #7
              Ok so let's help out those who are having to look for alternatives.

              For the mare users I know that Regu-Mate is the most likely alternative.

              What do people suggest for the gelding owners who maybe don't want to experience all the fun of #tubapalooza ????


              Em
              "Courage is not the absence of fear but rather the judgment that something is more important than fear. The brave may not live forever but the cautious do not live at all." ~2001 The Princess Diaries

              Comment


              • #8
                Mare Magic...it has worked on several friends' geldings!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Xctrygirl View Post
                  Ok so let's help out those who are having to look for alternatives.

                  For the mare users I know that Regu-Mate is the most likely alternative.

                  What do people suggest for the gelding owners who maybe don't want to experience all the fun of #tubapalooza ????


                  Em
                  I get that you are being funny, but Depo is not a sedative and does not affect the horse in any way the same as PP. I get that it is thought to make a horse "quiet" and that could make it easier to show. For me and a lot of other horse owners, it makes the horse more manageable at home, on the trailer, in the day to day that has nothing to do with showing or often even riding the horse.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Need alternatives?

                    Try 24/7 turnout.

                    YMMV, but I've never had a horse with good ample turnout that was 100% sound (chemically and structurally), need depo. Of course horses that legitimately need depo for being chemically imbalanced are an exception, but these horses are genuinely rare as hen's teeth.

                    Depo is usually something that is prescribed here to treat the symptoms (such as bolting, bucking, being fractious, miserable, girthy, etc) rather than the cause. It's about time, IMHO.
                    AETERNUM VALE, INVICTUS - 7/10/2012

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Xctrygirl View Post
                      Ok so let's help out those who are having to look for alternatives.

                      For the mare users I know that Regu-Mate is the most likely alternative.

                      What do people suggest for the gelding owners who maybe don't want to experience all the fun of #tubapalooza ????


                      Em
                      I always used Vitamin B-1. Worked great for me. Works on both mares and geldings. YMMV.
                      ******
                      Shadow Dancer 2/17/91-12/23/10 - My Horse, My Heart <3

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by beowulf View Post
                        Need alternatives?

                        Try 24/7 turnout.

                        YMMV, but I've never had a horse with good ample turnout that was 100% sound (chemically and structurally), need depo. Of course horses that legitimately need depo for being chemically imbalanced are an exception, but these horses are genuinely rare as hen's teeth.

                        Depo is usually something that is prescribed here to treat the symptoms (such as bolting, bucking, being fractious, miserable, girthy, etc) rather than the cause. It's about time, IMHO.
                        24/7 turnout would help a lot of horses I know whose owners feel they need something to keep them "even". My own horse is on 24/7 turnout. And he couldn't be happier! I know not everyone has that option but when you read someone's horse is only turned out 4 hours a day and they want to know why he's acting as high as a kite on a 60mph windy day...well. Turnout. It does wonders!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by beowulf View Post
                          Need alternatives?

                          Try 24/7 turnout.

                          YMMV, but I've never had a horse with good ample turnout that was 100% sound (chemically and structurally), need depo. Of course horses that legitimately need depo for being chemically imbalanced are an exception, but these horses are genuinely rare as hen's teeth.

                          Depo is usually something that is prescribed here to treat the symptoms (such as bolting, bucking, being fractious, miserable, girthy, etc) rather than the cause. It's about time, IMHO.
                          Oh I have met some. Gelding on 24/7 turnout who would have full on meltdowns when a horse left the herd of 10. The depo did help significantly.
                          Of course his issues were enough he wasn’t showing anyways so it didn’t matter if depo was banned or not.
                          I do wish they had considered banning it only in geldings for the time being (at least, until a safe injectable alternative was brought to market) as I have seen it help mares in their estrus symptoms, even if it doesn’t block estrus.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by StormyDay View Post

                            Oh I have met some. Gelding on 24/7 turnout who would have full on meltdowns when a horse left the herd of 10. The depo did help significantly.
                            Of course his issues were enough he wasn’t showing anyways so it didn’t matter if depo was banned or not.
                            I do wish they had considered banning it only in geldings for the time being (at least, until a safe injectable alternative was brought to market) as I have seen it help mares in their estrus symptoms, even if it doesn’t block estrus.
                            His issues being, physical?

                            This particular topic is something that I've thought at length on, considering how heavily it is used in sport circles, how often I myself have administrated it as a BM, and having that "outside perspective" as a person involved in the care, but not handling (riding) the horse. Being that person on the sidelines, you often see the things those in the center cant see.

                            I routinely saw it administered for reasons unrelated to hormonal issues. Those issues included being fractious, girthy, "miserable"/ornery/irritable, difficult under saddle, difficult to work, difficult in any capacity, bucking, being "too sharp" for their riders, the list goes on.. and the one thing that was a unifying factor across all of these hundreds of horses, was that they were not what I would call 100% sound -- and they also saw limited turnout (fewer than 10 hours a day). This combination would make even a even-keeled horse become difficult to manage.

                            It's definitely something thrown out there to treat symptoms rather than the cause. Most of these horses I would have said were not sound, despite their owners insistence otherwise. Others were clearly demonstrating they were unhappy with their work - either from soreness or from improperly fitted tack -- but owners see, what owners want to see....

                            The most common issue I saw depo "improve" (as in mask or hide) the symptoms of was ulcers, and back-soreness or suspensory soreness. The horses were still uncomfortable -- they were just less likely to act out.
                            AETERNUM VALE, INVICTUS - 7/10/2012

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Nupafeed mag if you just need calming. can give them runny poop.

                              Hoping we don't see more schooling ring accidents like kicking and twirling as a result of this. . .

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by StormyDay View Post

                                Oh I have met some. Gelding on 24/7 turnout who would have full on meltdowns when a horse left the herd of 10. The depo did help significantly.
                                Of course his issues were enough he wasn’t showing anyways so it didn’t matter if depo was banned or not.
                                I do wish they had considered banning it only in geldings for the time being (at least, until a safe injectable alternative was brought to market) as I have seen it help mares in their estrus symptoms, even if it doesn’t block estrus.
                                Sounds like a highly insecure horse who needs to learn how to calm himself. There are ways to do it, it just takes time and patience, and more time and patience, which unfortunately a lot of people would rather just not put in.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by beowulf View Post

                                  His issues being, physical?

                                  This particular topic is something that I've thought at length on, considering how heavily it is used in sport circles, how often I myself have administrated it as a BM, and having that "outside perspective" as a person involved in the care, but not handling (riding) the horse. Being that person on the sidelines, you often see the things those in the center cant see.

                                  I routinely saw it administered for reasons unrelated to hormonal issues. Those issues included being fractious, girthy, "miserable"/ornery/irritable, difficult under saddle, difficult to work, difficult in any capacity, bucking, being "too sharp" for their riders, the list goes on.. and the one thing that was a unifying factor across all of these hundreds of horses, was that they were not what I would call 100% sound -- and they also saw limited turnout (fewer than 10 hours a day). This combination would make even a even-keeled horse become difficult to manage.

                                  It's definitely something thrown out there to treat symptoms rather than the cause. Most of these horses I would have said were not sound, despite their owners insistence otherwise. Others were clearly demonstrating they were unhappy with their work - either from soreness or from improperly fitted tack -- but owners see, what owners want to see....

                                  The most common issue I saw depo "improve" (as in mask or hide) the symptoms of was ulcers, and back-soreness or suspensory soreness. The horses were still uncomfortable -- they were just less likely to act out.
                                  Mental. Like a child throwing a temper tantrum. It was the worst herdboundness I had ever seen, and when the horses returned to the field he was attack them; mounting, biting, squealing, etc, as if he was mad they left him. He was normal under saddle. Very strange horse.
                                  I am a huge advocate for turnout. However, like that gelding and other stories of horses posted on the original Depo thread, some of them display aggressive or dangerous behaviors in turnout no matter how much, who, or where they are turned out.
                                  Under saddle is a different story. If your horse really needs depo to be ridden, you probably shouldn’t be at a show anyways.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by EmilyM View Post
                                    Nupafeed mag if you just need calming. can give them runny poop.

                                    Hoping we don't see more schooling ring accidents like kicking and twirling as a result of this. . .
                                    Seriously?

                                    How about, ride your horse? Train him kicking is a no no?

                                    Leaning on off label meds for stuff like this is totally ridiculous.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      I am wondering if there are specific breeds of horses that end up on depo more than others. It seems to be more common in the hunter world, and therefore, is it warmbloods that it is more common for? If it is, are we breeding something into them that is making them less manageable/rideable?

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by x View Post
                                        I am wondering if there are specific breeds of horses that end up on depo more than others. It seems to be more common in the hunter world, and therefore, is it warmbloods that it is more common for? If it is, are we breeding something into them that is making them less manageable/rideable?
                                        Possibly...some WBs lines are getting "bloodier" in some aspects. But honestly, I would put more money on any of the following:

                                        - Clients who have big eyes/big dreams and want the big, fancy warmblood that is too green/too athletic/too out of their riding ability
                                        - Clients who want to show (and win), now vs. taking the slower route or being mounted on a more suitable, quieter horse that's less athletic and less impressive
                                        - Trainers who encourage their clients to buy that horse, and are okay with their client being just a little over-horsed so that they reliant on their training program
                                        - Big box shows held for weeks at a time with little or no turnout available
                                        - Unrealistic/Idealistic judging standards that still prefer a nearly robotic hunter round
                                        - We have more "riders" in our sport, fewer true horsemen and well-rounded, knowledgeable trainers
                                        War Horse Blog
                                        Blogging for The Chronicle of the Horse

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X