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Signs that a horse dislikes/hates jumping?

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  • Hey, if it helps you get your thoughts in order to work things out here, great, but if you need a break from hashing everything out, like 4Leaf said, go do something fun or go play with your cute pony.

    Sending jingles your way....
    "So relax! Let's have some fun out here! This game's fun, OK? Fun goddamnit." Crash Davis; Bull Durham

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    • Yes absolutely take a break. It sounds like you now have useful support in real life and that can be more helpful than mulling it over here. Do the practical things now, and move forward in whatever direction emerges.

      I also did not see muscle atrophy on the rear view of the horse. He also was bent around to look at the camera and not standing 100% square.

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      • Oh darn girl, big hugs.
        "Punch him in the wiener. Then leave." AffirmedHope

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        • Wow. What a horrible trainer and sales barn. I'm so sorry you're going through this. Hang in there... you're definitely in the right place to get sound advice now.

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          • Originally posted by starr331
            I just got off the phone with the vet. I have no idea what I said and I can barely remember what he said either.

            I think this has gotten to a point where it's too hard for me to continue to talk about it. I'm visiting another barn this week and I will hopefully have a vet appointment early next week, so I'll update with details (probably on a separate thread, because this one is all over the place.) Thanks again to all of you.
            Totally get it. When the vet talks about someone else's horse, I listen and understand really well. When it's my own horse, no matter how minor the issue, all I hear is 'blah blah blah blah blah' while my mind goes 'OMG OMG OMG OMG!'.

            Nothing here is an emergency. Take your time. Take a deep breath. Everything will be ok. Sending hugs.
            ~ Citizens for a Kinder, Gentler COTH...our mantra: Be nice. ~

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            • Just read this whole thread this morning, found it very upsetting. I feel so badly for the OP and the poor horse. I really hope for a miracle that this will have a positive ending for both of them. It is certainly one hell of a life lesson. Good luck OP.

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              • Originally posted by snaffle635 View Post

                Totally get it. When the vet talks about someone else's horse, I listen and understand really well. When it's my own horse, no matter how minor the issue, all I hear is 'blah blah blah blah blah' while my mind goes 'OMG OMG OMG OMG!'.
                I'm so glad it's not just me. I have to have someone else there with me whenever I talk to the vet because I won't remember at all.

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                • [QUOTE=starr331;n10492683]I just got off the phone with the vet. I have no idea what I said and I can barely remember what he said [QUOTE]

                  You need to get a grip.
                  Call the vet back. Take notes, ask for explanations - in layman's terms - of anything you don't understand. Take notes!
                  Google for more information.

                  The difference between 15.1 & 15.3 is 2", not that big a deal.
                  Any vet should be able to peek at teeth & tell you if 9 or 19 is the more likely age.
                  Heck! Even I can do that!
                  And so could you, with Google's help.

                  For someone not a born English speaker, you seem quite capable of communicating in that language in writing.
                  If you worry an accent is making you misunderstood, write down what you mean to say to whoever you need to know.

                  *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
                  Steppin' Out 1988-2004
                  Hey Vern! 1982-2009, Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009
                  Sam(Jaybee Altair) 1994-2015

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                  • [QUOTE=2DogsFarm;n10493034][QUOTE=starr331;n10492683]I just got off the phone with the vet. I have no idea what I said and I can barely remember what he said

                    You need to get a grip.
                    Call the vet back. Take notes, ask for explanations - in layman's terms - of anything you don't understand. Take notes!
                    Google for more information.

                    The difference between 15.1 & 15.3 is 2", not that big a deal.
                    Any vet should be able to peek at teeth & tell you if 9 or 19 is the more likely age.
                    Heck! Even I can do that!
                    And so could you, with Google's help.

                    For someone not a born English speaker, you seem quite capable of communicating in that language in writing.
                    If you worry an accent is making you misunderstood, write down what you mean to say to whoever you need to know.
                    She states USA is not her country of origin not that English isn't her native language. I also find that when emotionally involved I have difficulty retaining everything explained by either vet or doctor.

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                    • [QUOTE=Cat Tap;n10493283][QUOTE=2DogsFarm;n10493034]
                      Originally posted by starr331
                      I just got off the phone with the vet. I have no idea what I said and I can barely remember what he said

                      She states USA is not her country of origin not that English isn't her native language. I also find that when emotionally involved I have difficulty retaining everything explained by either vet or doctor.
                      Which is why I suggested calling back & taking notes.
                      I have done it at Dr appts & for times I am upset, but need to have correct info. - even if it meant Googling later.

                      Somewhere upthread she said she feared an accent affected communication.
                      *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
                      Steppin' Out 1988-2004
                      Hey Vern! 1982-2009, Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009
                      Sam(Jaybee Altair) 1994-2015

                      Comment


                      • [QUOTE=starr331;n10493354][QUOTE=2DogsFarm;n10493347]
                        Originally posted by Cat Tap View Post

                        Good idea, I'll take notes.

                        With the accent thing, I meant that they may not have been able to understand my "northerner" accent (the vets are based in south Alabama, near the FL panhandle.) I know I sometimes have trouble understanding people with rich southern accents, figured it's the same thing the other way around. I am indeed very fluent in both speaking and writing English.
                        By and large my experience was that Southerners understand Northern accents (and Canadian accents) just fine, because those accents are "strandard broadcast accents." Southerners would hear them every time they turn on the TV for the news. And a vet is an educated person, who has been to university and then to vet school, and (you can check) may well have a degree from a university outside the South. If you yourself speak in clear sentences without a lot of ums and backtracking and dithering, no one in the South will have trouble understanding you. If you don't, even people with "Northern" accents won't follow what you are saying.

                        I can't count how many times I am served by young women in cafes or stores who get their sentences all muddled up when they are unclear on what they should say, or anxious. And we all have the exact same accent.

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                        • OP: do not be too hard on yourself. We have all been conned here or there. And I am so impressed by how much you care for Star.

                          I am not sure what you paid for him, but I highly recommend getting a lawyer. If your trainer was your agent then she had legal (fiduciary) duties to act in your best interests. Horses also need to be sold with known vices disclosed. And it sounds like FLA has a horse lemon-law. You should be able to have someone pay your costs or be able to return the horse. I know you adore him, but you may not be able to spend what he needs spent to care for and rehad him. What a terrible situation; your trainer is despicable.

                          I'm a lawyer--although not in FLA and not an equine lawyer--or I would for sure help you. You have been badly taken advantage of, I am so sorry for all you are going through.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Scribbler View Post
                            By and large my experience was that Southerners understand Northern accents (and Canadian accents) just fine, because those accents are "strandard broadcast accents." Southerners would hear them every time they turn on the TV for the news.
                            I think this is an oversimplification. There are certainly some Northern accents that are not "standard broadcast accents", such as some strong Jersey or Boston accents. I grew up in the southern US, and then went to college in Massachusetts, and there were people I had trouble understanding at times.
                            Last edited by Gardenhorse; Oct. 9, 2019, 10:04 PM. Reason: Quoting was messed up

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by BITSA View Post
                              I am not sure what you paid for him, but I highly recommend getting a lawyer. If your trainer was your agent then she had legal (fiduciary) duties to act in your best interests. Horses also need to be sold with known vices disclosed. And it sounds like FLA has a horse lemon-law. You should be able to have someone pay your costs or be able to return the horse. I know you adore him, but you may not be able to spend what he needs spent to care for and rehad him. What a terrible situation; your trainer is despicable.
                              Would the OP have to have had a written contract for the trainer to officially be her agent and have fiduciary duties? Or would a verbal contract, or the fact that OP payed the trainer's airfare to go look at the horse be enough?

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Gardenhorse View Post

                                I think this is an oversimplification. There are certainly some Northern accents that are not "standard broadcast accents", such as some strong Jersey or Boston accents. I grew up in the southern US, and then went to college in Massachusetts, and there were people I had trouble understanding at times.
                                I

                                Yes true, I was forgetting these regional accents! I was in Prospect Park in Brooklyn a few years back but still in this century taking note of the fact someone was running riding lessons there and heard a couple of young men saying something about "lokada hoises" in the kind of accent I thought didn't exist outside 1930s gangster films. I think it's really cool these pockets of regional accent still exist!

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                                • [QUOTE=Scribbler;n10493409][QUOTE=starr331;n10493354]
                                  Originally posted by 2DogsFarm View Post

                                  By and large my experience was that Southerners understand Northern accents (and Canadian accents) just fine, because those accents are "strandard broadcast accents." Southerners would hear them every time they turn on the TV for the news. And a vet is an educated person, who has been to university and then to vet school, and (you can check) may well have a degree from a university outside the South. If you yourself speak in clear sentences without a lot of ums and backtracking and dithering, no one in the South will have trouble understanding you. If you don't, even people with "Northern" accents won't follow what you are saying.

                                  I can't count how many times I am served by young women in cafes or stores who get their sentences all muddled up when they are unclear on what they should say, or anxious. And we all have the exact same accent.
                                  I had a Spanish teacher in high school. She was from Mid-Atlantic area of the US. She spent 2 years in Spain teaching English at a private school. They had another English teacher who was Irish. They mostly spoke to each other in Spanish since they each found the other's accents hard to understand. I feel bad for the students that had US teacher one year and Irish teacher the next or vice versa. That must have been a tough transition.

                                  Oh, well, clearly you're not thoroughly indoctrinated to COTH yet, because finger pointing and drawing conclusions are the cornerstones of this great online community. (Tidy Rabbit)

                                  Comment


                                  • Originally posted by Gardenhorse View Post

                                    Would the OP have to have had a written contract for the trainer to officially be her agent and have fiduciary duties? Or would a verbal contract, or the fact that OP payed the trainer's airfare to go look at the horse be enough?
                                    Contract not required. Florida law tends to lean especially towards finding a fiduciary relationship in these kinds of situations.

                                    Comment


                                    • [QUOTE=starr331;n10493354][QUOTE=2DogsFarm;n10493347]
                                      Originally posted by Cat Tap View Post

                                      Good idea, I'll take notes.

                                      With the accent thing, I meant that they may not have been able to understand my "northerner" accent (the vets are based in south Alabama, near the FL panhandle.) I know I sometimes have trouble understanding people with rich southern accents, figured it's the same thing the other way around. I am indeed very fluent in both speaking and writing English.
                                      Got it!
                                      I am from the Midwest.
                                      A friend moved to TN & I went to visit.
                                      Spent the weekend hearing people - with charming accents - inform me:
                                      "You're from back East, aren't ya?"
                                      First time I ever thought about having an accent myself
                                      It took some time for me to understand when people said "How about them Vols!"
                                      They were talking about the UT Volunteers, not the garden pest - the vole

                                      I'm sure your "Nawthener"accent is understood, but don't be afraid to ask politely for something to be repeated until you get it

                                      ETA: Quote function is behaving weirdly - seems to be crediting other than the poster quoted???
                                      *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
                                      Steppin' Out 1988-2004
                                      Hey Vern! 1982-2009, Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009
                                      Sam(Jaybee Altair) 1994-2015

                                      Comment


                                      • When I first moved to New York from England, I would watch the news on TV, and turn to my husband and say "I have absolutely no idea what that person just said...!" Tslk about two nations divided by a single language.
                                        '

                                        Comment


                                        • Originally posted by atr View Post
                                          When I first moved to New York from England, I would watch the news on TV, and turn to my husband and say "I have absolutely no idea what that person just said...!" Tslk about two nations divided by a single language.
                                          '
                                          I have the same problem watching some of the British programs. They seem to mumble a lot and I have to pay very close attention to understand what they are saying and I still miss a lot.

                                          Comment

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