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Tips for recording a jumping sales video

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  • Tips for recording a jumping sales video

    I take photos of my trainer's horses for their sales ad. We also take videos as well, but I don't know what sellers prefer to see.

    For example:
    1. When recording a course, should the person recording stand in the center of the ring?
    2. What if there is one jump that might partially block another jump because of how the course is laid out?
    3. Do you prefer clips that contain a few jumps or a whole course?
    4. What if the horse knocks a pole down while recording a course? Should I take out or end the video before that jump?
    5. How zoomed in should the horse be framed? Should they take up the entire frame or just most of the center?
    6. Do you prefer someone who zooms in and out as the horse goes around the ring? Or someone who minimizes the zooming and does so only when needed?

  • #2
    Originally posted by mydogs View Post
    I take photos of my trainer's horses for their sales ad. We also take videos as well, but I don't know what sellers prefer to see.

    For example:
    1. When recording a course, should the person recording stand in the center of the ring?
    2. What if there is one jump that might partially block another jump because of how the course is laid out?
    3. Do you prefer clips that contain a few jumps or a whole course?
    4. What if the horse knocks a pole down while recording a course? Should I take out or end the video before that jump?
    5. How zoomed in should the horse be framed? Should they take up the entire frame or just most of the center?
    6. Do you prefer someone who zooms in and out as the horse goes around the ring? Or someone who minimizes the zooming and does so only when needed?
    Honestly glad you brought this up because as someone who is not a professional, but has done a good bit of horse shopping on my own, I’ve seen so many ads and videos that leave me scratching my head.

    1. Stand wherever the best vantage point is in the ring. Generally where the most jumps are in view and not obstructed by anything. A lot of times this can be achieved from a slightly higher than ground level position. You could even sit/stand on the fence (as long as you won’t spook the horse you’re taking the video of )

    2. Sometimes this can’t be helped and that’s fine. As long as most jumps are in view. To avoid this as much as possible, see #1.

    3. A full course, at the height you are advertising the horse can jump is always preferable. ie, if you are advertising the horse as a 3’6” child/adult jumper, a video of it jumping a single outside line at 2’6” isn’t going to mean much to me.

    4. When I watch sale videos, I generally assume I’m watching the horse performing at its best, because why would you send a sub par video to a potential buyer? Videos are their very first impression of the horse. So no, if I were selling a horse I would not include a jump where the horse pulls a rail. Even if it was an obvious rider error, it still distracts from you showing the horse off.

    5./6. Most people just use their phones to take videos nowadays, and phone cameras keep improving so that’s not necessarily a bad thing. But, they don’t have much zoom and if the ring is big enough the horse eventually ends up a speck and it’s hard to see much of anything in that case. So yes, if you’re videoing in a large ring I always prefer zoom.

    Hope that helps!

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by mh97 View Post
      4. When I watch sale videos, I generally assume I’m watching the horse performing at its best, because why would you send a sub par video to a potential buyer? Videos are their very first impression of the horse. So no, if I were selling a horse I would not include a jump where the horse pulls a rail. Even if it was an obvious rider error, it still distracts from you showing the horse off.
      I do not include videos of horses having rails unless there's something crazy spectacular about the round the is more important than whether the horse is clean.

      But this is an interesting point and one that drives me crazy in horse sales. I have many videos of my "amateur-proof" horses being put to TERRIBLE GOD AWFUL NO GOOD VERY BAD distances by amateurs and kids alike. I always offer them up as proof of how much of a saint the horse is after I've had several conversations with a buyer, but would never advertise with them. But that's the part that drives me crazy because it seems like such a positive thing to see if you're really trying to advertise a horse's pack-i-tude. Here's an example: https://youtu.be/o_3rTtB-IRg Sent a [very good] catch-riding-kid into a medal class on one of my mares. At :50, the rider made a questionable decision. I love this video because to me it shows everything someone would need to see to show that yes, the mare will bail anyone out of a bad decision. And if I'm being honest, *I* was happier with the ride than if every fence had been perfect. But I guess it competes with the narrative that the horse is so simple to ride that distances magically show up?

      Anyhow, a little bit of a tangent, but just wanted to say that I, personally, love the less-than-perfect videos!
      __________________________________
      Flying F Sport Horses
      Horses in the NW

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by mydogs View Post
        I take photos of my trainer's horses for their sales ad. We also take videos as well, but I don't know what sellers prefer to see.

        For example:
        1. When recording a course, should the person recording stand in the center of the ring?
        2. What if there is one jump that might partially block another jump because of how the course is laid out?
        3. Do you prefer clips that contain a few jumps or a whole course?
        4. What if the horse knocks a pole down while recording a course? Should I take out or end the video before that jump?
        5. How zoomed in should the horse be framed? Should they take up the entire frame or just most of the center?
        6. Do you prefer someone who zooms in and out as the horse goes around the ring? Or someone who minimizes the zooming and does so only when needed?
        First and foremost a seller should attempt to present a video that shows the horse in its best light -- that is what the buyer expects. Don't leave it up to imagination.

        The video is best taken from a vantage point that would obstruct as little of the horse as possible. If you watch professional video rounds taken at a horse show, the videographer is often situated at a vantage point that is higher than ring -- somewhere in the stands or on a berm or hill.

        If the horse is being advertised as green and only doing lines, showing a few jumps at a time is fine. If the horse is being advertised as doing complete courses, that is what the video should show, including walk to canter transitions before and after the course. If the video is cut off abruptly, the viewer will assume (and probably rightly so) the deleted footage was unflattering.

        As an earlier poster stated, the marketing video is assumed to be showing the horse in its best light. Pulled rails, tail cranking, rushing, breaking, fussiness, etc. are not things that should be shown in a video unless the buyer wishes to associate the horse with those faults.

        As for zooming, it should be attempted. A video that shows a horse jumping a course while the horse is nothing more than a 1/2" speck on the far side is not terribly useful.

        Use a camcorder when possible. Smartphone video is easy for the seller, but they produce low quality video. The quality of the video sends a message.
        Last edited by OneTwoMany; Sep. 11, 2019, 09:26 AM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Opinions differ, but I personally am 100% against adding music to a video.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by jonem004 View Post
            Opinions differ, but I personally am 100% against adding music to a video.
            I assume music is added in most cases to cover up a rub or distracting chatter that is taking place in the background. But I agree, don't add music. If something needs to be covered up, muting is your friend.

            Comment


            • #7
              Just a couple of quick comments on what I have seen in sale videos that really bother me! You too may already have these as a no as well:

              Make sure there is no unneeded clutter in the ring - just the course
              And no empty jump cups left on standards


              I find a little attention to detail makes the over all presentation of the horse that much more professional...

              Comment


              • #8
                While you are showing off the horse in the best light, make sure you are showing off yourself in a good light as well. Make sure you arena and background is clean , tidy and free from things that make people question your horsemanship.

                When the arena gate is held together by bale twine, perhaps that makes me think twice about the care and diligence the horse has received

                Totally agree get slightly above the action and mute the sideline commentators

                posting at same time as MInt HIll. Sorry for redundancy
                _\\]
                -- * > hoopoe
                Procrastinate NOW
                Introverted Since 1957

                Comment


                • #9
                  Ride smart.

                  If you land from a jump on the left lead, and you have enough room to turn either left or right, and your horse doesnt have a reliable change, for the love of God, just turn left.

                  If for whatever reason you decide to turn right and counter canter your turn, don't put that in the video.

                  Brain cells, people.
                  Brain cells.
                  The Noodlehttp://tiny.cc/NGKmT&http://tiny.cc/gioSA
                  Jinxyhttp://tiny.cc/PIC798&http://tiny.cc/jinx364
                  Boy Wonderhttp://tiny.cc/G9290
                  The Hana is nuts! NUTS!!http://tinyurl.com/SOCRAZY

                  Comment

                  • Original Poster

                    #10
                    Originally posted by meupatdoes View Post
                    Ride smart.

                    If you land from a jump on the left lead, and you have enough room to turn either left or right, and your horse doesnt have a reliable change, for the love of God, just turn left.

                    If for whatever reason you decide to turn right and counter canter your turn, don't put that in the video.

                    Brain cells, people.
                    Brain cells.
                    Good point! Now, what if the horse lands on the left lead and you have to turn right, and the horse doesn’t have a clean change? Do you do a transition to switch or start the course over again?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by mydogs View Post

                      Good point! Now, what if the horse lands on the left lead and you have to turn right, and the horse doesn’t have a clean change? Do you do a transition to switch or start the course over again?
                      I say start again. I want to see a horse in the best possible light. Don’t do 40 takes and jump their legs off, but if I’m seeing a video where the horse misses leads I assume it’s a problem and they can’t land leads reliably.

                      I’m also a big fan of the pro ride in a sale video. Especially on a green horse. It’s distracting watching a rider make mistakes, and it makes me assume that they’re not valued in the program they’re in.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I expect to see a video that is reflective of the horse being sold. I don’t mind a missed lead change for a green horse, or a poor distance for a short stirrup packer, but I wouldn’t even bother to look at any jumper with a rail in a sales video. In general, I also strongly prefer seeing horse show footage for all horses except absolute greenies.

                        Actual video footage should be high quality, well lit, and have the horse well visible (seems obvious, but you wouldn’t believe some of the videos I’ve been sent over the years.) If you are filming at home, make sure the ring is clean and tidy, and both horse and rider are well turned out. It’s worthwhile spending a bit of time and effort to get it right.

                        In in terms of content, ideally I want to see a brief walk, trot, canter both directions, a lead change each way, and a jump course. But again, I cannot stress this enough: if the horse is a being marketed as a Children’s Hunter/ 1.20m Jumper /Equitation packer... I expect to see horse show footage of it doing THAT job.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Just wanted to add, and I know that you didnt exactly ask this but, please dont put in endless laps at the trot and canter. circling in each direction at multiple gaits and changes if you want to highlight them are more than enough prior to the jump portion of the video. Good to have a flatwork video on hand for potential inquiries tho

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I second Annabelle. I too like professionally produced show video. Also: drives me nuts to read ad after ad about the horse having done 1.30 "in Europe" and then watch a .90 jump video. It's gotten to the point that every time I read that and see low jumps, the seller gets less credible to me.

                            I've seen blurry videos, videos with jump cuts, sometimes enough to make me wonder why the seller didn't want to show me one continuous course. Sure, the seller wants to put the horse's "best foot forward," but I prefer an realistic presentation. Is the left lead change sticky? I'd want to know, but it wouldn't put me off. I'd just like to know what the issues might be, and then I'll determine if I would want to take them on. As for rails, Every horse pulls one at one time or another--it's up to the honest seller to determine if the downed rail in the video is an aberration and, if so, decide not to use that footage.

                            Been doing heavy horse-shopping lately, and getting very cranky about all the fairy dust and, frankly, presumption of some sellers who are trying to move horses in the high-five or even six figures using absolutely awful video. And, yes, spare me the music.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by mydogs View Post
                              Good point! Now, what if the horse lands on the left lead and you have to turn right, and the horse doesn’t have a clean change? Do you do a transition to switch or start the course over again?
                              I mean, don't set up outside diagonal outside diagonal and do "a course", unless your horse is super consistent and you can bang that out without jumping his legs off. Set something with a variety of singles and lines with options to change direction both ways so you can just jump around.

                              Jump around for 10 minutes catching every jump in the ring, picking your course as you go, then look at your footage and put two or three segments of at least 4 or 5 jumps each with no mistakes together.

                              The Noodlehttp://tiny.cc/NGKmT&http://tiny.cc/gioSA
                              Jinxyhttp://tiny.cc/PIC798&http://tiny.cc/jinx364
                              Boy Wonderhttp://tiny.cc/G9290
                              The Hana is nuts! NUTS!!http://tinyurl.com/SOCRAZY

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by Cocorona View Post
                                Just wanted to add, and I know that you didnt exactly ask this but, please dont put in endless laps at the trot and canter. circling in each direction at multiple gaits and changes if you want to highlight them are more than enough prior to the jump portion of the video. Good to have a flatwork video on hand for potential inquiries tho
                                Flat work should be a separate video, a little walk, trot and canter both directions, lead changes if applicable, no more than 2 min long. Done.

                                https://youtu.be/EgEa32aBjGI

                                Unless you need to show off canter pirouttes, pi/pa, tempis, halfpass etc there is no need for more than 2 min. It goes how it goes, folks!
                                The Noodlehttp://tiny.cc/NGKmT&http://tiny.cc/gioSA
                                Jinxyhttp://tiny.cc/PIC798&http://tiny.cc/jinx364
                                Boy Wonderhttp://tiny.cc/G9290
                                The Hana is nuts! NUTS!!http://tinyurl.com/SOCRAZY

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by meupatdoes View Post
                                  Ride smart.

                                  If you land from a jump on the left lead, and you have enough room to turn either left or right, and your horse doesnt have a reliable change, for the love of God, just turn left.

                                  If for whatever reason you decide to turn right and counter canter your turn, don't put that in the video.

                                  Brain cells, people.
                                  Brain cells.
                                  Actually, this bugs the crap out of me as a buyer. If they tell me the horse has a change, and I visibly see them turning to accommodate the landing lead, I know they're BSing.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Oh, also, if the horse is lathered with sweat in the video, it's a HUGE red flag. Details.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Unless a horse is quite green, I really discount all at home video and will prioritize a show video above all else. So I would focus on getting very quality show videos. But I totally agree with everyone above, the arena at home should reflect well on you, and music is a real no no.

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