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Learning to jump

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  • KingRocker4Life
    started a topic Learning to jump

    Learning to jump

    Hi guys! I was recently told by my trainer that I will be starting to learn how to jump at the trot while I learn to perfect my canter. I was supper excited to hear this as I have always wanted to learn how to do showjumping. While I learn how to do that I will be showing in equitation classes walk/trot. basically I wanted to hear any tips on how to learn how to jump. I would also like to know of any good helmets that I could use for my jumping lessons.

    Any help will be much appreciated, thanks!

  • KingRocker4Life
    replied
    thanks. I will try all of that.

    Leave a comment:


  • MissCoco
    replied
    Practicing 2 point is great advice, as is general ab strengthening exercises like planks etc.
    This summer I have instituted a rule that every solo ride I do needs to include at least 5 straight minutes of two point, it can be at the walk, trot, or canter, but I have to maintain a solid two point the entire time.
    I started out by doing two sets of 2 minutes each with a 30 second break, recently I've been doing 2 sets of 3 minutes. It really helped me to stretch the amount of time I was in two point.

    I remember reading about a "2-point push-up" in some thread on COTH once, that helped me a lot as well, I couldn't find the thread, but this article describes it (Fix 9)
    https://practicalhorsemanmag.com/tra...iding-problems

    I have only ever tried this at the halt, and find it helpful to have a ground person call me out when I let my heels come up or start leaning forward rather than keeping my center of gravity (aka my butt) back over the saddle, especially the first few times I tried it.

    Leave a comment:


  • gertie06
    replied
    Practice your two-point! Literally spend as much time doing it as possible. I see too many beginners (and not beginners, if we're being honest) who cannot hold their body position while jumping. Luckily, you can practice it at the trot and canter. Heck, you can practice it at the walk! At first, you can use the neck for light support. Once you've found your balance, try not to use the neck for support. Finding your balance at the two-point is absolutely critical for jumping.

    Leave a comment:


  • jetsmom
    replied
    Do some exercises at home to strengthen your core. Look up 7 min synergistic abs. Great 7 min program to strengthen ab muscles. Get some 5 lb weights and do butterflies, shoulder presses. Do planking.
    . They will all help your riding immensely.

    For riding/jumping just remember heels down, and look up. Don't force heels down, but relax your weight into your heel.

    Leave a comment:


  • KingRocker4Life
    replied
    My instructor has a great eye. And she is an eventer which does help. We both agree that the hunter seat is terrible and she is not young ( mid 20s or so ) or inexperienced as she is nearly 55 with over 20 years of experience teaching and riding.
    Last edited by KingRocker4Life; Aug. 14, 2019, 11:06 PM. Reason: posted too soon

    Leave a comment:


  • Foxtrot's
    replied
    What I see as a big gap in jumping instruction is instructors who have an eye for equitation. So many of the younger, newer instructors do not have this themselves, yet set themselves up as instructors. George Morris was my go-to all my life. Guard against jumping ahead of the horse with the crotch ahead of the pommel, leg slipping back, ducking, and eyes not looking ahead for next jump, or a jab in the mouth on landing when your butt falls back. Not good enogh for the instructor to just say "good" or "well done".

    Eventers have a form to function seat which is secure.....Hunters have a slightly different look. (hate it!)

    Get an instructor with a good eye.

    Leave a comment:


  • Scribbler
    replied
    Originally posted by KingRocker4Life View Post
    they are gonna have me trot to the jump, jump it, and then canter after the horse and I finish the jump.
    Yeah, this is pretty standard, both for beginner riders and for green horses. After a bit I expect the coach will add a second element to the sequence so that you trot into one crosspole, canter a set stride length to the second element, and jump that.

    Leave a comment:


  • KingRocker4Life
    replied
    they are gonna have me trot to the jump, jump it, and then canter after the horse and I finish the jump.

    Leave a comment:


  • 2DogsFarm
    replied
    Okay, I'll ask what nobody has yet:

    You say you will be trotting to jumps "until you perfect your canter".
    What problems are you having with canter?

    I hope you & your trainer both understand that a jump is really just a canter stride, and when you land from any height jump - even the teeniest X - your horse will want to continue in canter.

    Is the plan to trot to and halt immediately after the jump?
    Or continue in canter so you can "perfect"(?) that gait.

    Agree your first purchase should be a helmet of your own that fits you & is ASTM approved

    Leave a comment:


  • Scribbler
    replied
    Originally posted by KingRocker4Life View Post
    I don't know. I guess I would just wear the helmet that fits me then.
    Buy your own helmet as soon as you can.

    Leave a comment:


  • KingRocker4Life
    replied
    I don't know. I guess I would just wear the helmet that fits me then.

    Leave a comment:


  • Scribbler
    replied
    Originally posted by furlong47 View Post

    Once you have a helmet of your own, why would you still borrow one? There aren't specific helmets for jumping vs riding on the flat. As long as the helmet is certified, you can wear the same one for everything. Your own helmet is always best because you know how it has been cared for and that it hasn't been compromised by a fall, drop on a hard surface, being left in a hot car, etc. Plus it's not full of other people's old sweat!
    Yes exactly. Get a helmet that fits so well you don't remember you are wearing it and wear every time you ride and take care of it. Why would you wear a borrowed helmet if you have your own?

    Leave a comment:


  • furlong47
    replied
    Originally posted by KingRocker4Life View Post
    Thanks for all the advice! To clarify : I have been wearing a helmet every single time that I have been near or on a horse. When I said that I wanted a helmet just for jumping I meant that I can use for jumping lessons and borrow a helmet from the barn during practice rides and other lessons. There is no way that I would ever ride without a helmet as I know that it can llitterally save my life.
    Once you have a helmet of your own, why would you still borrow one? There aren't specific helmets for jumping vs riding on the flat. As long as the helmet is certified, you can wear the same one for everything. Your own helmet is always best because you know how it has been cared for and that it hasn't been compromised by a fall, drop on a hard surface, being left in a hot car, etc. Plus it's not full of other people's old sweat!

    Leave a comment:


  • KingRocker4Life
    replied
    Thanks for all the advice! To clarify : I have been wearing a helmet every single time that I have been near or on a horse. When I said that I wanted a helmet just for jumping I meant that I can use for jumping lessons and borrow a helmet from the barn during practice rides and other lessons. There is no way that I would ever ride without a helmet as I know that it can llitterally save my life.

    Leave a comment:


  • Equestrian24
    replied
    The helmet you buy should be the one that fits you best. Going to a tack shop and trying them on is a great way to find the best one for you. I really like the Ovation Deluxe Schooler. It's not anything fancy, but it's very reasonably priced and comfortable, and is a good fit for an oval shaped head. I rode in Troxels for years before that, but those are better for more round head shapes, so they didn't fit me as well. Definitely replace it if it takes a fall (why I like going for a cheaper helmet for schooling; they all have to meet the same standards so none are any less safe than the rest, and I've taken a fall in a helmet literally one or two days into owning it and had to replace it before). Helmets also expire generally every 5 or so years, as the materials inside disintegrate over time. Helmets have a date of manufacture on the inside that you should go by rather than purchase date, and I would try to make sure to get a newer one, as sometimes they sit in the tack shop for a year or so. Make sure never to leave it in extreme heat or cold, especially in a hot car, and try not to drop it.

    As for learning to jump, I second the advice saying to listen to your instructor and try to get as much time in the saddle as possible! I've pretty much started from scratch after nearly a decade away from hunter/jumper and just following my trainer's advice and trying to ride as much as possible has helped a lot.

    I definitely agree with the advice to stick with lesson horses for awhile, too, and then maybe move onto a lease before eventually buying. Your trainer should have some pretty good advice on when the appropriate time to lease or buy would be. Scribbler said it best, also about the free horses as well. Take this from someone who is pretty much stuck paying for a horse I inherited from a deceased loved one who is not trustworthy under saddle, is older, and is too high risk to sell without the likelihood of ending up somewhere bad (and I'd never forgive myself if I let that happen; I love the horse, but it's a very frustrating situation). It's expensive, can really be a headache, and sometimes it's not easy to get out of if it doesn't work out. I wish I could use that money for extra lessons or to do a partial or full lease on a schoolmaster!

    Leave a comment:


  • Impractical Horsewoman
    replied
    I assumed that as well, about the borrowed helmet, but I'm still a bit concerned someone has been riding for a fair amount of time and the trainer hasn't stressed the need to get a properly-fitting helmet for the OP. It's not enough to simply have a certified safety helmet on the head, it needs to be properly fitted. It doesn't need to be the most expensive on the market, but it needs to fit, and it's a necessary investment. For example, Troxels just don't fit my head, and the only make I've found thus far to suit me is Charles Owen. Other people I know love Troxels and it fits them well. Helmets also expire after five years or a hard fall. Plus, not to be gross, but there are hygiene issues with shared helmets. Sorry for the rant, I just always get a bit nervous when I see big boxes of very old, crusty "loner" helmets at riding schools.

    Leave a comment:


  • trubandloki
    replied
    Originally posted by bluepece2 View Post

    Hoping they have been using a borrowed helmet and now feel they are ready for their own
    This is what I assumed too.
    But HungarianHippo's advice is good.

    Leave a comment:


  • bluepece2
    replied
    Originally posted by HungarianHippo View Post
    Congratulations on learning how to ride. But I'm concerned when you say that you are going to buy a helmet just for jumping. You must be wearing it every ride, every time. If you are attending a riding school where helmets are not required for all mounted activities, that is a signal that it may not be a good-quality riding school. There are many great places where you can learn how to ride, you should pick one that values safety above all else.
    Hoping they have been using a borrowed helmet and now feel they are ready for their own

    Leave a comment:


  • DarkBayUnicorn
    replied
    Originally posted by HungarianHippo View Post
    Congratulations on learning how to ride. But I'm concerned when you say that you are going to buy a helmet just for jumping. You must be wearing it every ride, every time. If you are attending a riding school where helmets are not required for all mounted activities, that is a signal that it may not be a good-quality riding school. There are many great places where you can learn how to ride, you should pick one that values safety above all else.
    ^^^ THIS. I thought I had misread the question. You wear a helmet EVERY time you ride. If your coach does not insist on that (and practice it themselves), he or she is no proper coach.

    Leave a comment:

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