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In Over My Head?

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  • #41
    Originally posted by ClassyJumper View Post
    I think with green horses often at the beginning the bad rides outnumber the really good ones and it takes a while for the numbers to even out and then shift in your favor. If you are 1 bad ride away from sending a horse back I think *maybe* greenies arent for you. Nothing wrong with that, just sayin'.
    There is a wide range of 'greenies' or even made horses that are hard to ride for a variety of reasons. Some traits of greenies are harder for some people. For other people, that trait is not an issue. I don't mind one that bucks or plays, but I am bad at riding a stopper.

    To dismiss the rider as unable to deal with greenies because she can't deal with this one seems short sighted.
    *****
    You will not rise to the occasion, you will default to your level of training.

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    • #42
      Originally posted by Midge View Post

      There is a wide range of 'greenies' or even made horses that are hard to ride for a variety of reasons. Some traits of greenies are harder for some people. For other people, that trait is not an issue. I don't mind one that bucks or plays, but I am bad at riding a stopper.

      To dismiss the rider as unable to deal with greenies because she can't deal with this one seems short sighted.
      Thanks for saying this! I was thinking the same thing. Can't some horses just be a little nutty? Kind of like some people are neurotic.

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      • #43
        Originally posted by HLMom View Post

        Thanks for saying this! I was thinking the same thing. Can't some horses just be a little nutty? Kind of like some people are neurotic.
        Agree as well. Not all greenies are anxious nutters. Some are quiet and willing, just discombobulated and uncertain. OP, don't give up on yourself after one try. Maybe another project would just be a better fit for you.

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        • #44
          I've been reading this thread for a while, and I agree with a lot of different points that are being made. I do think that not all greenies are the same, and I also don't think one's ability to ride one green horse defines their ability to ride other green horses.

          I think honestly, though, it comes down to what your goals are, which seems to be so many of what these threads come down to. Is your goal to have fun and enjoy your riding? Are you having fun and enjoying your riding? Is your goal to challenge yourself with a green bean or a horse that doesn't come naturally to you and see how you progress? Are you genuinely afraid of getting hurt, or just getting frustrated with the process?

          I don't think there are any good or bad reasons for deciding to either keep the horse or send it back, nor is it a reflection on you as a person one way or the other. This is an expensive and time consuming sport, so just decide what your goals are and then work towards them - that may or may not involve this particular horse.

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          • #45
            I have a QH greenie with a little over 60 days training on him who can take my weenie butt out w/t/c on the buckle in an open field. However, he's had a good natural horsemanship foundation put on by a professional and he's a QH. Not all horses are as calm minded as him. A few weeks ago I felt like I could barely trot him so it's definitely a learning process but no bucking, tail swishing, baulking, head up in the air whinnying. Keep looking for something a little calmer and I bet you could have fun bringing a greenie up.

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            • #46
              Is there any video?? I can read the words over and over and think 'green horse' but videos actually help so we can see what both elements (Horse & rider) actually look like.

              Em
              "Courage is not the absence of fear but rather the judgment that something is more important than fear. The brave may not live forever but the cautious do not live at all." ~2001 The Princess Diaries

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              • #47
                Originally posted by gertie06 View Post

                Agree as well. Not all greenies are anxious nutters. Some are quiet and willing, just discombobulated and uncertain. OP, don't give up on yourself after one try. Maybe another project would just be a better fit for you.
                It would be one thing if this was your horse for the foreseeable future, but it sounds like you have yet to commit to him. Maybe it's just me, but I don't see the real benefit of exerting effort and finances on a green as grass OTTB unless you have a future with it either as a sale prospect or your own personal horse.

                I brought my green TB along with regular training rides and lessons from a suitable trainer, but it was admittedly a test of my commitment and pretty frustrating at times.
                Love my "Slow-T T B"
                2010 OTTB, Dixie Union x Dash for Money

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                • Original Poster

                  #48
                  Thanks, y'all. I've really appreciated all the insight. The horse is going home on Friday. Because I don't own him, have no stake in him, and don't enjoy the ride, I just can't see any reason to continue investing time/money in him. I'm out some $$ on shipping, but maybe it was a valuable lesson learned about my skill set and what I can handle/enjoy.

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                  • #49
                    I think you did the right thing. We've had (and do have) quite a few OTTBs in our barn, some of whom were purchased directly from trainers at the track and restarted. While the horse's way of going (too fast, unbalanced, head in the air, crooked, etc) sounds typical, his level of anxiety doesn't. Some of the horses I've seen retrained (or helped retrain myself, regarding the ones I own) have been hot - that didn't mean they were panicky and totally unfocused. I think there are probably plenty of other OTTBs out there that would be within your ability and comfort level to bring along. This horse was costing you money, time and stress, and is not your problem to deal with. You'll find a more suitable horse, and you shouldn't think TBs are necessarily too much for you. Just this one.

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                    • #50
                      I am very disappointed at the wives tales and mid-understanding that some folks have disseminated on this thread.

                      If you have spent ANY time on the backstretch during the morning sessions you would know most OTTBs know how to walk, trot, canter (both leads as they do work left and right), as well as gallop. They can work alone or in a group. They are actually VERY well trained, just not in what is expected in this discipline (as ISP said).

                      It takes a certain kind of rider to take an OTTB and get them from track trained to English discipline trained and the OP is not it. You have to ride with confident patience as well as accurate discipline. Every ride should be one where the rider creates an environment with clear answers to specific questions, e.g. being very clear to ask for left or right canter lead. This means the rider needs excellent equitation (not the pretty kind) where their balance on the horse is spot on to not interfere.

                      From what I am reading, the OP is just not suited to this attitude and not ready for this task right now. And she doesn’t have the support system to actually help her learn what to do and how to do it.

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