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Mystery bit

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  • Emquestrian
    started a topic Mystery bit

    Mystery bit

    Is anyone familiar with this bit? I only have a side view, no mouth piece to go off of. I’ve seen it on a few horses and curious as to what it is, and what it does. No particular need besides an inquiring mind ) TIA! *picture attached*
    Attached Files

  • findeight
    replied
    If people will pay that, it is good quality workmanship and materials? Why not? It a business. Something like an unjointed low port Mylar dee snaffle without hooks was around 100 some 10 years or so back. This PP has more pieces and more work on the mouthpiece. Might pay it I had the horse it was perfect for.

    Its fine to cite flatwork but if you have one trying to take you waterskiing off the far corner to the last fence, the course designers joke, the dreaded single oxer on the diagonal headed to the out gate 5 strides ahead? You might like being able to give horsey a little bump that won’t knock him off stride like a full half halt would.

    Or the Derby course with a late in the course, forward, bending 8 strides to a 4’ wide oxer then 6 strides to a 4’ stone wall. Under the lights. Might need a little tweak there in the heat of competition without nagging or picking, experienced hunters can count fences and will try to light the jets and/or pull like a tractor when they get to 5 or 6. Yet are light and polite otherwise.

    And thats one reason some might like this bit. Allows a light but meaningful split second correction in the show ring at the instant of infraction.

    Having had sensitive horses, can see why they might like it as well, it’s the quick action then staying out of their way. So, yes, both types might go well in it and it might be an appropriate choice for a trained horse with an educated rider. Or like my last Hunter, sensitive for 6 fences and a freight train down the last line. Lord help you if you had to turn past the gate and jump more fences in a Classic.

    Leave a comment:


  • StormyDay
    replied
    Originally posted by OutsidersOpinion View Post
    The people on here saying go spend that much money in lessons have never shown a quality derby horse or high performance hunter. Do all 1.60/5* horses go in plain snaffles? No. They are strong and opinionated and athletic. A high quality hunter is no different.

    I personally used that bit on a young horse in the show ring that is EXTREMELY sensitive in the mouth, and she loved it. I could stay out of her way until she got too greedy then quietly remind her that she needed to balance or slow down with 1/16 of the hand necessary in another set up. She has enough flat work to go win USET finals, but she's still exuberant about her job and needs a bit more bridle for the show ring. So do most horses.

    That 1/16 of force necessary compared to 11/16 in a different bridle can be the difference between and 85 and a 92 in the hunter ring, where finesse is important.
    I have no problem with the bit, it’s not what I would immediately go to for training but as you say sometimes horses prefer one bit over another.
    My problem is with that is 500$ and there seems to be no real reason as to why.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nickelodian
    replied
    Originally posted by mroades View Post
    They are actually not harsh at all. They lie flat in the mouth and don't pinch the tongue at all.
    This.

    Don't judge what you don't know. The lightest of light horses go best in this bit, as do some pullers. I special ordered one with a ball in the middle in a full cheek and it made one of mine go from a high 70s to a high 80s horse because he stopped curling up to avoid the bit and took contact. Horses love them, and they can be worth every penny for the ones that do. I mean really, we're scoffing at 470.00 bits when the horse's mouth they go in are worth 6 figures?

    Leave a comment:


  • mroades
    replied
    They are actually not harsh at all. They lie flat in the mouth and don't pinch the tongue at all.

    Leave a comment:


  • MyssMyst
    replied
    Originally posted by OutsidersOpinion View Post
    The people on here saying go spend that much money in lessons have never shown a quality derby horse or high performance hunter. Do all 1.60/5* horses go in plain snaffles? No. They are strong and opinionated and athletic. A high quality hunter is no different.

    I personally used that bit on a young horse in the show ring that is EXTREMELY sensitive in the mouth, and she loved it. I could stay out of her way until she got too greedy then quietly remind her that she needed to balance or slow down with 1/16 of the hand necessary in another set up. She has enough flat work to go win USET finals, but she's still exuberant about her job and needs a bit more bridle for the show ring. So do most horses.

    That 1/16 of force necessary compared to 11/16 in a different bridle can be the difference between and 85 and a 92 in the hunter ring, where finesse is important.
    I'm really new to hunters, but this makes sense to me. With my western Arabs, I school regularly in a rubber or otherwise very gentle snaffle. They know their job, and they'll do it readily, but a bigger port allows for a bit of extra drape, a little less hand motion, a lot more subtlety. Even my main ring hunters school in far less bit than they show in for that exact reason.

    Leave a comment:


  • OutsidersOpinion
    replied
    The people on here saying go spend that much money in lessons have never shown a quality derby horse or high performance hunter. Do all 1.60/5* horses go in plain snaffles? No. They are strong and opinionated and athletic. A high quality hunter is no different.

    I personally used that bit on a young horse in the show ring that is EXTREMELY sensitive in the mouth, and she loved it. I could stay out of her way until she got too greedy then quietly remind her that she needed to balance or slow down with 1/16 of the hand necessary in another set up. She has enough flat work to go win USET finals, but she's still exuberant about her job and needs a bit more bridle for the show ring. So do most horses.

    That 1/16 of force necessary compared to 11/16 in a different bridle can be the difference between and 85 and a 92 in the hunter ring, where finesse is important.

    Leave a comment:


  • shedllybip
    replied
    The bit has been 'in' for quite a few years. And no it doesn't mean your horse isn't broke. Some horses just need a little bump from time to time instead of a contstant pull. We use it on my horse from time to time when he gets a little dragging me around and yes he is broke, but needs an occasional reminder to behave and not drag. I don't really find it to be a super harsh bit but can send a quicker / better reminder than a slow twist with us constantly pulling pulling pulling.

    Leave a comment:


  • eclipse
    replied
    It always surprises me that gags, elevator type bits etc aren’t allowed in the hunter ring, even though the actual mouth pieces may be an egg butt type bit (of course it may not be!) but just because of the “action” it’s not allowed.....but thin, sharp, harsh bits....sure....go right ahead! Why not just allow some of the other types of bits, and just maybe these harsher bits wouldn’t be needed!

    Leave a comment:


  • mmeqcenter
    replied
    I consider a thin twisted wire bit to be absurdly harsh, and the mystery bit (aka Pletcher) in this thread is no better.

    Just because someone is an accomplished rider/trainer, that doesn't mean their tack choices/creations are above reproach.

    Leave a comment:


  • kashmere
    replied
    Originally posted by HJdaydream View Post
    Sure is a lot of hate and judgement being thrown around here, from what I suspect are people who have never had first hand experience with the bit.
    I don't know that hate and judgment is a reasonable characterization of the comments here. You're right that I haven't had firsthand experience with the bit, but I am an educated rider and horseperson and also... this is a message board designed to share ideas and opinions.

    It's also not actually very difficult to draw reasonable conclusions about the action of a bit by looking at it. This is a very thin bit - and the little cut outs in the mouth piece have the effect of making it even thinner. Each edge of the cutout extremely thin and would exert a great deal of pressure on the bars. Beyond that, it would have similar action to most 3-piece Dee ring snaffles. The attachment of the mouthpiece to the rings looks like there's a lot of potential to pinch, and the configuration of the link in the centre also looks like it could pinch quite a bit - but again, overall the snaffle action is going to be just like a regular 3 piece/double jointed snaffle.

    In particular, I was responding to the notion that these are "magic" and let the rider all of a sudden give an effective half halt. An effective and well ridden half halt comes primarily from the seat. If one has a horse who typically runs through half halts all of a sudden back way off because this bit has been put in its mouth - the effectiveness of one's half halts has not improved - the harshness of the bit has increased. Looking at this particular bit, I'm not surprised that a horse would back off if a sharp aid was applied. That would hurt, plain and simple.

    I'm not judging anyone, let alone hating anybody for asking about this bit, or even using it. But my opinion above still stands - a bit isn't a replacement for a well schooled half halt.

    Leave a comment:


  • StormyDay
    replied
    Originally posted by dani0303 View Post

    They're incredibly harsh while looking on the outside like a simple snaffle.

    The Pletcher bit is for when your hunter isn't even remotely broke but you need it appear "pleasant" to ride in the hunter ring.
    That’s nothing new though. Those bike chain bits have been used for decades but they aren’t 500$.
    Is it just because it’s the new ‘in’ bit?

    Leave a comment:


  • staceymc
    replied
    It's great for one that leans. I wouldn't put it on a horse for a beginner, but for a good top level hunter rider it's a nice option to have in your tool box. Not sure if Peter developed it, but he definitely loves the bit and uses it on several horses that I've seen. Someone please go tell him that he would have been better served taking lessons and learning to ride.

    Leave a comment:


  • Foxtrot's
    replied
    Coming from someone who only uses a Nathe or Trust...

    Even George Morris says a twisted wire snaffle is acceptable -- but he demands light hand and a horse trained on the flat.

    Personally, never seen the bit in question.

    Leave a comment:


  • HJdaydream
    replied
    Sure is a lot of hate and judgement being thrown around here, from what I suspect are people who have never had first hand experience with the bit.

    I have seen plenty in person and personally know many horses that got in them very well. It is NOT a razor blade. Thinner then a lot of bits? Yes. But the edges are rounded and smooth. While not for uneducated hands, I don't see them as being way more severe then a thin twisted wire for example. Horses I have witnessed going in them know their jobs quite well and don't need much hand at all. Keep in mind that the majority of hunter riders don't strap their horses mouths closed so the horse can make it evident if they feel the pressure if too rough.

    This feels like a lot of "drama" compared to the set-ups seen in many other disciplines. Just my 2 cents though.

    Leave a comment:


  • findeight
    replied
    Originally posted by Daventry View Post

    Flame suit on. For me personally, this is an unconventional bit and appears to be incredibly inhumane. This just makes me shake my head. I think the $500 would be better spent purchasing lessons and learning how to ride properly...or taking the time to get your hunter broke.

    And hunter riders wonder why other disciplines mock our sport. :/
    .Be surprised how few riders in other disciples know little or nothing about the latest celebrity endorsed or designed majikal bits in Hunters. They are too busy buying the same thing in their own dicipine’s version with current celbrity du jour endorsement or design credit. It’s the same old same old regardless of the saddle and clothes.

    Need to actually see this bit to pass judgement. Might suit some horses in some situations in the hands of a competent rider and it’s legal. Hunters don’t drop bridles. Often wonder about the level of involvement celebrity endorsers actually have in all these products their name is on. Got a friend who does barrels and she has a BNBR bridle, known Reiners with BNR bits and Im sure there’s celebrity endorsed Dressage and Eventing products out there too. Fir sure SP has celebrities endorsing their supplements who really don’t have a clue.

    Anyway, nobody really cares outside their own disciplines and most know not to throw stones from their glass house.


    Leave a comment:


  • endlessclimb
    replied
    Originally posted by 4LeafCloverFarm View Post
    Anybody else think the center "figure 8" links could pinch the tongue in certain circumstances? Youch!

    I just shake my head at some of these "custom" or "designer" bits that are all the rage. Just, why?
    They look like a couple chain links, which isn't necessarily bad. In a large way, the chain mouthpieces in the western world work a lot like a waterford. Not something you'd want to ride in every day, but serve a purpose at times.

    That said, the profile shot of this bit looks like a razor blade. I've never seen something look so benign from one view, yet have the ability to be so severe from the other. Reminds me of those "piano wire" twisted wire tune-up bits I've seen in the (thankfully) distant past. Yikes.

    Leave a comment:


  • Arlomine
    replied
    God forbid someone actually learns to use their aids to balance a horse’s canter without needing a piece of fat wire in the horse’s mouth. Yuck.

    Leave a comment:


  • 4LeafCloverFarm
    replied
    Anybody else think the center "figure 8" links could pinch the tongue in certain circumstances? Youch!

    I just shake my head at some of these "custom" or "designer" bits that are all the rage. Just, why?

    Leave a comment:


  • Daventry
    replied
    Originally posted by kashmere View Post

    I don't think it's "magic" I think it's pain. That is an extremely thin bit which is going to exert an enormous amount of pressure on a tiny area of the bars.
    Flame suit on. For me personally, this is an unconventional bit and appears to be incredibly inhumane. This just makes me shake my head. I think the $500 would be better spent purchasing lessons and learning how to ride properly...or taking the time to get your hunter broke.

    And hunter riders wonder why other disciplines mock our sport. :/

    Leave a comment:

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