Stallion Spotlight

Vitalis_img_4461skawx LL_Fotos

Real Estate Spotlight

01 Aerial front of House and property
  • Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 5/9/18)
See more
See less

Buying a horse from a seller you don't trust?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #21
    My daughter's trainer occasionally will. She knows at pretty much every major player in the H/J world in the mid-Atlantic. Her parents and grandparents probably knew their parents and grandparents. She sort of knows how a particular individual is apt to be dishonest. If she's really interested in a particular prospect she'll work out a way that covers her butt. Usually a trial at her barn that's long enough for drugs to pass from the system, etc.

    Comment


    • #22
      Many of these posts make me grin! I remember one filly that was always somewhere else, requiring trailering whenever I asked about her.

      The eventual purchaser informed me that when purchased the mare loaded easily despite it being the first time loaded. ??

      This was not the first discrepancy accredited to this "agent".
      Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.

      Remember the horse does all the work, we just sit there and look pretty.

      Comment


      • #23
        I fall in the camp of "I believe it when I see it." In my opinion, the horse only does something if I see it doing it in person or in a video. However, it doesn't necessarily dissuade me from buying a horse if the ad stretches the truth.

        Given what I know about the market, is the horse in front of me worth what they are asking? Given what I have seen, is this a horse I want to own? Could I live with the "unknowns" being negative? If the answers are yes, I probably move forward. If no, then I don't.

        I think it is extremely rare to buy a horse with a 100% true and accurate representation of its entire history. Honestly, most of the time, people just DON'T KNOW. So you go off of what you can figure out. Internet stalking tends to bring up a lot of truths too. ;-)
        www.mayaswellevent.wordpress.com

        Comment


        • #24
          I think a lot of sellers don't know what they don't know. They think their horse is A circuit quality but are offended when buyers don't think so. They might think a horse is bombproof and simple when really it's not. They claim it has scope for the 1.20 but have never sat on a 1.20 horse.... So I don't think it's about whether to trust the seller, but more about whether you trust yourself to know if the horse is suitable. Of course there are sellers who are deliberately misleading or who might not disclose a vice, but I think more often (especially in the market you are shopping) they genuinely believe what they are telling you is true. The lead change over the jump is the perfect example, that person might genuinely believe that means the horse has a change.
          The onus is definitely on the buyer to evaluate if the horse is suitable irrespective of the sellers claims.

          Comment

          • Original Poster

            #25
            I am ok with a naïve seller. Someone who just doesn't know. It's the sellers that are selling themselves as pros but what they say vs what they show are two different things. I guess it feels manipulative, and I think I would be very mad at myself if the horse turned out the be a mistake.

            Bringing home a horse tomorrow to try to build into something useful.
            Freeing worms from cans everywhere!

            Comment


            • #26
              Originally posted by CHT View Post
              Scribbler the budget is fixed unfortunately, but client has some flex in her wants...so we will have to give on what we get.

              It's been low level pros that have been the ones who have been difficult, and unfortunately they are luring the client in by being over the top in their praise of her riding skills "horsey loves you so much, he goes so much better for you than me" and so forth. (client is moderately disabled, and I wonder if they are picking up on that)

              I actually don't care about the lack of a flying change: that is something we can give up to save money, but when a seller advertises that the horse has auto changes, and then can't show a single change when the client goes to see the horse (or on a video), and tries to convince me that changing leads over a fence is a flying change, I start to get annoyed. (also tried to tell me a vertical in a video was an oxer...).Or there's the horse that has competed to Entry Eventing, and jumps 3 foot courses, but can't pick up the correct lead on the flat and only has video of 18" verticals.

              the one horse I actually don't mind, but their deception makes me wonder if the horse is just really tough at the higher fences, OR it started to go sore when they put more work on it, and it lost its changes?

              I thinking I need to make my own low level jumpers or move away from the discipline. It is ridiculous.
              This is not unique to low level jumpers sadly! The last time my sister was looking for a dressage prospect in the $5-10K range, that was already going W/T/C she ran into all kinds of inaccurate/naive advertising such as a horse "schooling 2nd level" who went around with it's nose pointing straight up in the air, or to the horse that was advertised for $8K and in person was grossly underweight and obviously hadn't seen the farrier for some time. It's a difficult price range.

              Comment

              • Original Poster

                #27
                Originally posted by ace** View Post

                This is not unique to low level jumpers sadly! The last time my sister was looking for a dressage prospect in the $5-10K range, that was already going W/T/C she ran into all kinds of inaccurate/naive advertising such as a horse "schooling 2nd level" who went around with it's nose pointing straight up in the air, or to the horse that was advertised for $8K and in person was grossly underweight and obviously hadn't seen the farrier for some time. It's a difficult price range.
                Lol, yes...the "my horse can do a shoulder in sort of, so it is schooling 2nd level", and what is with people neglecting farrier work on horses they have for sale over auction prices? A trim is cheap to do, but expensive if left undone. The horse I am bringing home tomorrow has never seen an actual farrier in his 9 years (nor a vet)! Sheesh.
                Freeing worms from cans everywhere!

                Comment


                • #28
                  Originally posted by ace** View Post

                  This is not unique to low level jumpers sadly! The last time my sister was looking for a dressage prospect in the $5-10K range, that was already going W/T/C she ran into all kinds of inaccurate/naive advertising such as a horse "schooling 2nd level" who went around with it's nose pointing straight up in the air, or to the horse that was advertised for $8K and in person was grossly underweight and obviously hadn't seen the farrier for some time. It's a difficult price range.
                  This! This a very real phenomenon in the horse industry and it's mind boggling. I helped a friend shop in that price range and then I shopped in that price range last year. It's the worst price range.

                  For me, I just won't spend more than $10k on a horse because I know I don't need it or really want it. At the same time, realizing what I got out of a $500 project pony was about what I could get out of that budget was a little disheartening.

                  I was a little tricky because I didn't want a thoroughbred and I didn't want to deal with "baby s***" but there were a lot of false starts and misleading advertising and unpleasant surprises.

                  I did end up finding the perfect horse in that price range, just had to concede a bit on age and greeness. I do feel like I got a bargain which is rare in that price range.

                  I know horses are expensive and almost always a losing proposition for a seller but at the same time, I wouldn't trade in my beater car that gets from point a to point b just to spend $10k on a half junked out BMW that needs to be towed out of someone's driveway


                  Comment


                  • #29
                    Originally posted by CHT View Post
                    I am ok with a naïve seller. Someone who just doesn't know. It's the sellers that are selling themselves as pros but what they say vs what they show are two different things. I guess it feels manipulative, and I think I would be very mad at myself if the horse turned out the be a mistake.

                    Bringing home a horse tomorrow to try to build into something useful.
                    What I'm trying to say is that a lot of pros don't know either. It takes nothing to call yourself a pro and get a group of clients.

                    Comment

                    • Original Poster

                      #30
                      Originally posted by winter View Post

                      What I'm trying to say is that a lot of pros don't know either. It takes nothing to call yourself a pro and get a group of clients.
                      Agree: but I don't want to reward that behaviour by giving them money....which may be a dumb way of thinking about it.
                      Freeing worms from cans everywhere!

                      Comment


                      • #31
                        If you have even a wee doubt about sellers honesty you will always have that feeling that horse is NQR. Trust your first impression. There are more horses .

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X