• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

calling on COTHERS...help with this mystery

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • calling on COTHERS...help with this mystery

    Okay....here's the scenerio....my three horses go out about 16 hours a day, they are used to the heat, cold..etc.

    One does have a history of colic...had surgery in 2004 for flipped intestine.

    Routine....BO brings horses in at 6am, I ride, feed lunch turn back out around 2pm...this has been the norm for the past 3 months.

    Night of July 4th, horses went out during day instead of night, just to be safe.

    July 5th...horse with colic history...totally normal...acting normal..eating normal, nothing out of the ordinary. Turn horse out, horse lays flat out in pasture and won't get up. Call BO, call vet (had to wait for call back/holiday)...15 minutes later, horse gets up and starts acting totally normal. Vet says give 5cc's of banimine (we assume colic) and call back if not normal. Horse is totally normal. I assume that horse may have been dehydrated from being in all night on July 4th.

    Today...horse is totally normal....was normal last night in turnout, I give a bucket of alfalfa cubes and later beet pulp with electrolytes..making sure that I get fluids in this horse. About 5 gallons total while in the stall. Horse is perky, normal self.

    Go to turnout...same scenerio as day before...horse goes down, flat out (I'm talking, if you had driven by, you would have come running to get me to tell me that my horse was dead..flat out) Call vet....he says to watch horse..I do. 20 minutes later..gets up, chases my gelding off the water, goes over to drink, goes out to graze like nothing ever happened.

    At first I thought we had tying up...but vet said horse would have, had trouble walking....not the case

    Horse is passing gas when laying there and moaning....twitchign back legs. I tell vet this...he says, sounds like horse is truly sleeping.

    I have never had a horse go from a stall to a grassy field and just lay down for 15-20 minutes unless something was wrong.

    Vet is stumped, second vet is stumped....only thing I've done differently is put a good amount of Swat on the horses' faces before turning them out because the flies are very bad.

    This has always been a sleepy horse....sleeps in the crossties, never gets really worried about anything. Never thought much of it till now....now I'm wondering about narcolepsy.

    Thoughts? Opinions? Experiences with Narcolepsy? This horse is 9 and been with me since 3 months of age....never seen this before. Does this sound like possible narcolepsy?

    Thanks

  • #2
    Was he inside during any fireworks? Had a couple of bad nights (no sleep) and now just wants to get outside (where he feels safer) and sleep?

    Sorry, no clever ideas, but good vitals, eating and drinking can't be all bad, I hope for his sake.
    Click here before you buy.

    Comment


    • #3
      Have you ever seen your horse sleep in the stall? Is it possible that their stall is not comfortable/too small/too hot/whatever to lay down in, and they are truly just taking a snooze once turned out?

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #4
        Originally posted by deltawave View Post
        Was he inside during any fireworks? Had a couple of bad nights (no sleep) and now just wants to get outside (where he feels safer) and sleep?

        Sorry, no clever ideas, but good vitals, eating and drinking can't be all bad, I hope for his sake.
        Possible....but was out last night..back to normal routine.

        Yeah, I'm not stressing out over it. I think I freaked everyone else because I wasn't freaked out when it happened.

        Comment

        • Original Poster

          #5
          Originally posted by BrightandClear View Post
          Have you ever seen your horse sleep in the stall? Is it possible that their stall is not comfortable/too small/too hot/whatever to lay down in, and they are truly just taking a snooze once turned out?
          True...the only thing is.....horse has never done this before..not horse's normal routine....never seen horse go down this time of day before.

          Comment


          • #6
            When you say his legs are twitching and he's passing gas, does he seem content while he's doing this, or in pain?

            My crowd has developed various habits at one time or another that "weren't normal" but soon became part of their normal routine. A new pattern has to start somewhere. Mine lay all the way out flat to sleep every day. Often multiple times per day. Sometimes it's at 9 a.m., sometimes 3 p.m., and sometimes 7 p.m. Sometimes it's this pasture, or that pasture, sometimes up by the barn.

            Sweets has always been a big sleeper and will lay down anywhere to take a nap. I went out one day and she was asleep in the run in with her head UNDERNEATH a rubber mat. I lifted up the mat and she blinks her eyes and looks at me like - hey, put the sun shade back down. Scared the living *&%$ out of me.

            A couple weeks ago I was mowing one of the pastures, and she laid down in the unmowed grass, flat out and went to sleep. What horse goes to sleep with a piece of loud machinery cutting grass 100 feet away? Good grief.

            She's one of those that won't get up either! If I want to ride or need her up and moved for one reason or another, she'll just lay there and rub her nose on her leg, or flop over flat and scratch her neck on the ground and totally ignore me like -if I ignore you, will you just go away?

            So stuff like that doesn't alarm me, but I can see if it's not part of the norm that it would be alarming. Hmmm, wish I had some helpful info but I don't.

            Comment


            • #7
              I have a horse, all winter, like clockwork, napped from 10:30-11am. Flat out, dead horse imitation.

              In the summer heat, I haven't seen him lie down during the day.
              Now, he falls asleep with his chin on the round bale - honestly.

              Nothing has changed, all vitals normal.

              Maybe your horse just likes to snooze in the sun?
              You're entitled to your own opinion, not your own facts!

              Comment


              • #8
                Sounds to me like he is snoozing. I had a mare that was too high strung to(lie down to) sleep. She would fall asleep standing up and fall to her knees, wake up and start all over. It sounds to me like your horses sleep schedule was upset so he is "catching up". I would not worry about it.
                I also once had an old horse who loved to sleep all layed out flat- for some reason especially on the snow. People were always coming to tell me he was dead. Just needed a good sleep.

                Comment

                • Original Poster

                  #9
                  Doesn't seem to be any sort of pain...just normal sounding moans and groans.

                  Okay, ya'll are making me feel better.....just a really bad place to pick to lay your arse down....at the gate!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Narcolepsy,
                    It generally does not first present itself as a horse choosing to lie down. Most folks notice the problem when the horse falls down in front of their eyes OR they notice the iconic and relatively unmistakable leg scrapes due to such falling.

                    However... *IF* your horse has been dealing with a subtle case for a long time, he might have learned how to prevent damage/pain by going down by choice when he first feels the precursor to a narcoleptic attack; much the same way service dogs can be trained to detect the first signs of seizure activity in a human.

                    I am ultimately disinclined to say this is a likely solution because narcoleptic sleep is not necessarily deeper then any normal sleep pattern. So narcolepsy alone wouldn't cause your horse's deep sleep and thus the difficulty you experience in trying to arouse him.

                    It's definitely an interesting situation, and thankfully there doesn't seem to be any harm coming of it right now. I'll be curious to see what others suggest or opine.
                    Do not take anything to heart. Do not hanker after signs of progress. Founder of the Riders with Fibromyalgia clique.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      If it helps any--my neighbor used to call me in a mild panic because she'd notice Sadie "laying down an awful lot." I'd laugh and tell her, dont worry, SHE'S LAZY! And she is, she takes naps,flat out, recumbent, standing up, sometimes she falls asleep when she's being ridden, and once she fell asleep and went to her knees while the farrier was working on her ("Uh, Sadie, just because he's holding up one of your front legs doesnt mean he can keep you off the ground if you decide to fold up the other one.")

                      The OTHER horse, now, I almost never catch him copping some z's. And the one time, just this past Memorial Day, that I saw him laying down close to the barn I knew he was colicking, and so he was. He NEVER lays down where you can see him or get to him easily, only up in the field, and then seldom. But when he was hurting he made sure he was where I'd notice.

                      Whereas it would not surprise me much to wake up in my own bed some morning and find Sadie in my room asking me to move over and let her get a little shut-eye....

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Narcolepsy.
                        I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          If he's deliberatly picking a place and laying down (as opposed to just randomly falling over/down asleep) then I'd go with him just taking a nap.
                          Different Times Equestrian Ventures at Hidden Spring Ranch
                          www.DifferentTimesEquestrianVentures.com

                          Comment

                          • Original Poster

                            #14
                            It starts out as a plop down to roll...which I expected (same spot, etc..and then the horse just rolls over and lays on side for many minutes.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Could he be very vaguely sore somewhere and getting up requires just a bit more of an effort of will, so he has to gather himself up a bit before rising?

                              Try pinpointing THAT. Sorry. Probably not very helpful.
                              Click here before you buy.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Wow, we had a mare at our barn in NC that did the EXACT same thing except maybe worse. She was an older mare, probably 19 or so. She would simply lay down right at the gate as soon as she was turned out. She would go into a deep sleep and start twitching hind legs and her eyes would roll around and she would shake at times. We called vet out twice thinking she was having some sort of seizure since she would not wake up. Vet said she didn't know what the horse was doing but it most likely was not a seizure and told us not to worry about it.

                                The mare continued to do this for years, not every day, but most. She is still alive and well today, probably 25 years old roundabout. I still talk to her owners and she is just fine and dandy. I'll have to ask if she still does that weird thing at the gate. Is this some freaky mare thing I wonder? Mystery indeed.

                                Comment

                                • Original Poster

                                  #17
                                  Originally posted by dwblover View Post
                                  Wow, we had a mare at our barn in NC that did the EXACT same thing except maybe worse. She was an older mare, probably 19 or so. She would simply lay down right at the gate as soon as she was turned out. She would go into a deep sleep and start twitching hind legs and her eyes would roll around and she would shake at times. We called vet out twice thinking she was having some sort of seizure since she would not wake up. Vet said she didn't know what the horse was doing but it most likely was not a seizure and told us not to worry about it.

                                  The mare continued to do this for years, not every day, but most. She is still alive and well today, probably 25 years old roundabout. I still talk to her owners and she is just fine and dandy. I'll have to ask if she still does that weird thing at the gate. Is this some freaky mare thing I wonder? Mystery indeed.
                                  Perhaps these two are somehow related? You'll have to find out the breeding for me. So far we have mare and NC in common.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    All in all I would trust your instincts. Sometimes gas or impaction has to build up to show full signs of colic. I have many horses, especially when it's warmer, that will go out and within an hour are laying flat out sleeping. One fellow has started doing this mid day. Worried me at first, but after about 4 days I decided he was simply changing his routine. I hope it's as simple as this. I know the concern you have with your horse having had colic surgery.
                                    Susan B.
                                    http://canterberrymeadows.com/

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      You should really check your horse's heat rate when he's having an episode. To me, it sounds like how some of my horses sleep--but I don't know your horse.

                                      If his heart rate is elevated, he's probably in pain. If it is low, he could be sleeping.

                                      Narcolepsy is different. I rode a horse before he had been diagnosed and he would fall down while ridden and quick catch himself. before he fell on his side. Sometimes his knees would buckle and that would 'wake' him up. Hewould do the same thing when you handled him in general...he never just layed out in the field flat out with gas (or if he did, it was not attributed to the narcolepsy).

                                      Just FYI, narcolepsy can be confused with many other things, like EPM and other neurological problems.
                                      Kim
                                      'Like' my facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Calla...946873?sk=wall

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by baysngreys View Post
                                        I have a horse, all winter, like clockwork, napped from 10:30-11am. Flat out, dead horse imitation.
                                        This is the routine of the majority of my crew every day. I cannot tell you how it freaked me out at first. They all took turns starting this little routine so at least one a week I was calling the vet in a lather thinking that something horrible was happening!
                                        I Loff My Quarter Horse & I love Fenway Bartholomule cliques

                                        Just somebody with a positive outlook on life...go ahead...hate me for that.

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X