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Who uses Calf Manna? Who REMEMBERS Calf Manna?

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  • The Vet advised feeding the Calf Manna when our horse had a case of Potomac Fever in 2011. She said ANYTHING we could get her eating would be helpful, so horse didn't lose muscle mass.

    I hadn't used Calf Manna in a LOT of years, but it smelled just the same! Horse liked it right away, and ate the Calf Manna with her wet beet pulp, 3rd cutting hay. Lots of steady, small helpings of food.

    We were glad the CM helped us out so well, would use it again or suggest using it for a sick horse. We only needed the one bag to get her thru sickness to recovery to a good appetite again. Horse is a VERY easy keeper, so she doesn't need any extras in her meals.

    Comment


    • I must have known the only horses in the world that hated it!

      I remember desperately trying to mix it in and soup up the grain of an elderly almost toothless Quarter Horse mare who hated the smell or something of it and would carefully try to sort around it or just refuse her feed with it unless I hid/mixed it well with water.

      Her best friend was the same way and turned up his nose.

      Never used it under any other circumstances, but have enjoyed reading stories and recollections about it.
      Semi Feral

      Comment


      • I used it for weight gain on a TB and it worked very well. Plus they always have a coupon on their website

        Comment


        • Who uses Calf Manna? Who REMEMBERS Calf Manna?

          Me. Me.Me! Although I have never used it!
          Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.

          Remember the horse does all the work, we just sit there and look pretty.

          Comment


          • I used it on a very picky, underweight weanling – worked GREAT, she loved it, and would then eat the rest of her ration.
            APPSOLUTE CHOCKLATE - Photo by Kathy Colman

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Beverley View Post
              Au contraire, my experience was that it didn't hype up horses unlike Red Cell.

              I used it with great results, lastly on an ancient mare to help keep weight on and prevent anemia. I haven't used it since she was put down in '95, but wouldn't hesitate to select it because of familiarity ahead of newer products that might be just as good, I just don't know 'em. One feeds per instructions, the little cardboard box presumably still comes in the bag.
              This explains a TON about my old campaigner, who at one point was getting both Red Cell AND Calf Manna. If you added a sniff of alfalfa to THAT mix, he turned into a little red QH rocket!

              Thanks for reminding me about this stuff, and how much they like it; will definitely get some for some of those "picky" 20 and 30-somethings!

              Comment


              • I just used it last summer for a mare that was giving everything to her colt and having trouble with weight. If you go to the website they even have a "horse formula" now, I think it is called horse manna! Still works great to add that extra that the skinny ones need, not sure if it is rocket fuel as I wasn't riding mine

                Comment


                • My kid sister's horse is the devil to keep weight on (hard keeper TB, cribs, thin skinned, cold easily, the works) and he loves his Manna. I have no idea how much he's eating now. Enough to help his weight but not enough to make him want to do aerial dressage. If I didn't suspect my guy would turn into a balloon I'd put him on it.
                  "I'm not always sarcastic. Sometimes I'm asleep." - Harry Dresden

                  Amy's Stuff - Rustic chic and country linens and decor
                  Support my mom! She's gotta finance her retirement horse somehow.

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                  • Ooh, just what I was looking for. =)

                    A friend of mine fed Calf Manna to her big, hard-keeping WB several years ago and swears by it. Trainer swears by rice bran to put weight on. Horse is getting 4lbs of a complete feed and good hay, but needs to put on just a bit of weight. I'd like to use a supplement like thee CM or rice bran instead of jumping him up to 11lbs/day of grain like the suggested feeding.

                    Thoughts? Horse is super quiet, big TB. Needs to fill out muscle-wise as well, which is why I'm considering the CM.
                    runnjump86 Instagram

                    Horse Junkies United guest blogger

                    Comment


                    • I remember it, but never used it. I wait till the feed companies put cow and other animal products in a bag marked "horse" and then I pay double for the product.

                      I've never had a horse that wasn't an easy keeper. Including 3 ottb mares. Every time I try to use something for nutrition, I have to give it away because it puts weight on my horses. And I prefer my horses hot, the opposite of what everyone else wants.

                      I think Jefferslivestock.com still sells it.

                      Comment

                      • Original Poster

                        A big, hard-keeping warmblood getting only 4 pounds of feed a day? No wonder he is quiet and under-muscled

                        With all of the modern formulations of feed for horses today, there is no excuse for under-feeding a sport horse with the reason of they don't want to give "too much grain" or, they don't want to pay for what is necessary. Safe Starch, Triple Crown Senior (which is not even a grain), etc etc. there a tons of choices out there. In any case, 4 pounds is probably not even enough to get "complete" groceries into him.

                        While I agree that more (good) hay and less grain is optimal whenever possible, I don't agree that adding Calf Manna or rice bran is necessarily the right way to bolster, (ie, not adequately feed), the calories that a horse needs.

                        Unless the horse is IR or there is something else missing to the picture, let us know. I suggest bumping your hard keeper's feed up to at LEAST 6 to 8 pounds a day, free choice hay (preferably with some alfalfa in it), and yes a supplement like calf manna, rice bran pellets, oil, or soaked beet pulp to his ration.
                        "I have never let my schooling interfere with my education." - Mark Twain

                        Comment


                        • Nothing to add except:
                          1 - Wow - a 5yo thread!
                          2 - when I read the title I could smell the Calf Manna

                          Yup, "back in the day" it was the GoTo to fatten up a horse.
                          That and the TizWiz were staples in the H/J barn I rode at in the mid-80s.
                          *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
                          Steppin' Out 1988-2004
                          Hey Vern! 1982-2009, Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009
                          Sam(Jaybee Altair) 1994-2015

                          Comment


                          • If the horse is thin, obviously he needs more food. Maybe a better hay in more quantity as well. Perhaps the complete feed is not adequate in what he needs. A different mix of nutritional foodstuffs would be my first way in changing things. They don't mention wet Beet Pulp, which we find very filling to large horses, and even when fed in big quantities, doesn't make their brains fall out. Calf Manna is good for fattening up horses, but we only ever used the one small box measure full on a daily basis. Had Western horses then who fattened up real easy.

                            Food doesn't make muscles, exercise does. Food will fill a horse out, fat on flesh, but without exercise the muscles are not there. Most horses being worked, getting fit, develop muscles AND look good, but will need regular work to keep from "feeling REAL frisky" when you get on. Alert, ready to go, means horse is in good shape, though many folks don't like any bounce to the strides! A horse coming out READY, scares the timid or rider with little confidence. Trainer has to keep horse ridable for his customer, though this doesn't sound good with a thin horse.

                            My large horses, 16-17H, Sporthorse types, don't need 4 pounds of grain a day. They maintain flesh and good condition on very little grain daily, with good pasture or hay depending on the time of year. You can't throw around a pound number, and expect it to work for every equine of a certain size. 10 pounds of grain a day would have my horses WILD, so much energy they would be bouncing off the walls!! Even in hard work, mine don't need that kind of grain for upkeep. They get a plain cracked corn and oats mix, usually less than a pound a day each. Two only get a handful, literally. Other folks ask about our feed, have switched over to this mix. They now feed much less daily and say their horses look better than ever, at a much lower cost for grain. Just basic foodstuffs, and they all look great, have all the energy they need for the work we ask of them.

                            I look at my results on the equine. If he is not what I want in looks and performance, the feed gets changed. Doesn't matter what brand name, I need to start reading labels and try other things so horse looks better and STILL is usable by the rider. May take a more personal approach than a stable can provide when they feed many animals. So that personal method is what needs to happen with this animal. There is a lot of options available these days in feeding horses, but a person needs to educate themselves and quit reading the advertising by the companies! Read the feed label on the bags or make up a mix of plain grains at the local elevator that will allow you to tweak it.

                            Don't continue to feed by the pound, when you see no results in improvement. Change something and feed a different way. Read and educate yourself so you understand how feed works in a horse.

                            [QUOTE=Iride;6706732]A big, hard-keeping warmblood getting only 4 pounds of feed a day? No wonder he is quiet and under-muscled

                            With all of the modern formulations of feed for horses today, there is no excuse for under-feeding a sport horse with the reason of they don't want to give "too much grain" or, they don't want to pay for what is necessary. Safe Starch, Triple Crown Senior (which is not even a grain), etc etc. there a tons of choices out there. In any case, 4 pounds is probably not even enough to get "complete" groceries into him.

                            Comment


                            • How about reading before flaming? My friend FED (past tense) her WB several years ago. Meaning, A. He's not mine, B. He is not the same horse I am talking about starting on Calf Manna. C. He is no longer alive, so moot point. That horse was very healthy but also extremely hot.

                              MY horse is getting 4lbs of high fat, high fiber grain and 25lbs of good hay a day. The *only* reason we want to put weight on him (and he was quiet when he was overweight, too. Amazingly enough, TB's can be quiet) is to help fill out his topline a bit better. He needs muscling and a topline, which we are working on. He is far from thin. He actually has a bit of a belly with just a hint of high ribs showing, which is normal for his build.

                              Damn. And my Arab/QH eventer who gets ridden 5x a week is on 3lbs of grain, 18lbs hay, and could drop some weight. Just FYI.
                              runnjump86 Instagram

                              Horse Junkies United guest blogger

                              Comment


                              • Just looked online and the #1 ingredient is soybean meal.

                                My soy sensitive horse would go bonkers (again) if I went back to good ole calf manna.

                                Sad so many feed producers are going the way of the soy bean.

                                Comment


                                • Originally posted by runNjump86 View Post
                                  How about reading before flaming? My friend FED (past tense) her WB several years ago. Meaning, A. He's not mine, B. He is not the same horse I am talking about starting on Calf Manna. C. He is no longer alive, so moot point. That horse was very healthy but also extremely hot.

                                  MY horse is getting 4lbs of high fat, high fiber grain and 25lbs of good hay a day. The *only* reason we want to put weight on him (and he was quiet when he was overweight, too. Amazingly enough, TB's can be quiet) is to help fill out his topline a bit better. He needs muscling and a topline, which we are working on. He is far from thin. He actually has a bit of a belly with just a hint of high ribs showing, which is normal for his build.

                                  Damn. And my Arab/QH eventer who gets ridden 5x a week is on 3lbs of grain, 18lbs hay, and could drop some weight. Just FYI.
                                  Deleted post - utter waste of typing time.
                                  Last edited by bludejavu; Dec. 10, 2012, 11:31 AM.
                                  Susan N.

                                  Don't get confused between my personality & my attitude. My personality is who I am, my attitude depends on who you are.

                                  Comment


                                  • Originally posted by runNjump86 View Post
                                    Ooh, just what I was looking for. =)

                                    A friend of mine fed Calf Manna to her big, hard-keeping WB several years ago and swears by it. Trainer swears by rice bran to put weight on. Horse is getting 4lbs of a complete feed and good hay, but needs to put on just a bit of weight. I'd like to use a supplement like thee CM or rice bran instead of jumping him up to 11lbs/day of grain like the suggested feeding.

                                    Thoughts? Horse is super quiet, big TB. Needs to fill out muscle-wise as well, which is why I'm considering the CM.
                                    Perhaps if you seperated the horses you are talking about more clearly, we wouldn't think your comments were about one horse with food issues, and a second horse just needing muscling up.

                                    Muscling comes from work. You can't feed a horse and get muscles. Your second post was a bit clearer, said TB needed a topline improvement. The best toplines, come from getting the horse using his back correctly, engagement of the hindquarters, self-carriage, to develop those muscles. So it is more of a work issue, than feed issue, if horse is getting enough food in the first place. Horse has to be worked correctly, consistantly, using various exercises that develop the muscling and lose the protruding spine area, keep it gone. This is a year-round project.

                                    Calf Manna is not going to fix lack of muscle.

                                    Comment


                                    • Originally posted by goodhors View Post
                                      Perhaps if you seperated the horses you are talking about more clearly, we wouldn't think your comments were about one horse with food issues, and a second horse just needing muscling up.

                                      Muscling comes from work. You can't feed a horse and get muscles. Your second post was a bit clearer, said TB needed a topline improvement. The best toplines, come from getting the horse using his back correctly, engagement of the hindquarters, self-carriage, to develop those muscles. So it is more of a work issue, than feed issue, if horse is getting enough food in the first place. Horse has to be worked correctly, consistantly, using various exercises that develop the muscling and lose the protruding spine area, keep it gone. This is a year-round project.

                                      Calf Manna is not going to fix lack of muscle.
                                      When I post on my phone I'm not going to insert five different paragraphs. Once again, "fed" is past tense, so perhaps reading comprehension would help.

                                      And yes, I am well aware that muscling comes through work, and correct work, which in my second post I stated we ARE working on. Thank you for pointing out the obvious. HOWEVER. I have read this thread, and there are a few posts where people fed it to help with muscle, especially in the stock horse world.
                                      runnjump86 Instagram

                                      Horse Junkies United guest blogger

                                      Comment


                                      • Originally posted by 2DogsFarm View Post
                                        Nothing to add except:
                                        1 - Wow - a 5yo thread!
                                        2 - when I read the title I could smell the Calf Manna

                                        Yup, "back in the day" it was the GoTo to fatten up a horse.
                                        That and the TizWiz were staples in the H/J barn I rode at in the mid-80s.
                                        The other one we always used to use was Clovite--also still available!

                                        Comment


                                        • Originally posted by runNjump86 View Post
                                          When I post on my phone I'm not going to insert five different paragraphs. Once again, "fed" is past tense, so perhaps reading comprehension would help.

                                          And yes, I am well aware that muscling comes through work, and correct work, which in my second post I stated we ARE working on. Thank you for pointing out the obvious. HOWEVER. I have read this thread, and there are a few posts where people fed it to help with muscle, especially in the stock horse world.
                                          Yet I'm the one who simply asked you for a little more info and you evidently couldn't be bothered to reply to my question. Are you here to learn something or simply to become defensive?

                                          ETA - nevermind, it's not worth my time. Deleting my above post which tried to help.
                                          Susan N.

                                          Don't get confused between my personality & my attitude. My personality is who I am, my attitude depends on who you are.

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