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Capped Hock

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  • Capped Hock

    Some Background:

    My youngster capped her hock last Monday (05/24). On vet's advice I cold hosed and applied a poultice once a day until the heat went away - about three days. She also received a one dose (500 lbs - slightly below her actual weight) of banamine a night for two nights to help with the inflammation. Then my vet's advice was once the heat went away to apply DMSO to the area once a day. Vet also cautioned not to get discouraged because it could be a month before the hock started looking more normal.

    The vet has already seen her twice: First was about a day after the injury - checked the swelling to make sure it was in fact a capped hock (05/25). Then a couple days later (05/28) the vet thought it had improved and I jogged her for him - she was sound. The vet is coming out again this Wednesday where an xray will be taken just to confirm that there isn't any other damage that may require more aggressive treatment.

    My girl was never lame in the sense that her movement was uneven or she struggled to move. The first day or two she was at most a little stiff in the morning when coming out of her stall for the first time but quickly walked out of it. She would also trot and canter sound.

    The reason I'm posting is that I do not have experience with this type of joint trauma. Is there anything else I should doing? Questions I should be asking my vet? Has anyone had any experience using Back on Track's hock boots for this type of injury? I just want to be a good advocate for my girl to make sure this blemish will go down as much as possible. Thank you everyone for your guidance.
    Last edited by Snaffle81; Jun. 1, 2010, 01:27 AM.
    I'm so busy I don't know if I found a rope or lost my horse

  • #2
    When my 2yo capped her hock, I had my vet out and he basically said, "That sucks." He said he has tried injecting every sort of steroid into them with little success and if it was his horse he wouldn't do it, he didn't think it was worth the risks, but he would do it if I wanted to try. He said there was a possibility she would grow out of it. I treated it with DMSO/Nitrofurazone forever. Fortunately, over time it did go down. Her hock is still a bit "knobby", but no longer has the fluid lump on it. They are just blemishes, even if they are really ugly ones.

    Comment


    • #3
      My young horse has a capped hock. It is really ugly and nothing made it go all the way down, so I feel your pain. My vet tried draining it and injecting it with a steroid because I couldn't stand it, and my horse had a reaction to the combination of the injection and sedative and his gut stopped. So not only did his hock come back up, he had to spend the night in the hospital colicking. My vet said it is rare for that to happen, but it can, so I would not reccomend injecting them! The main thing that helps to keep Buddy's smaller is ensuring that he has plenty of shavings in his stall when he is up. If we get skimpy on the shavings, it grows every time. Other than that, I try not to look as he is perfectly sound on it.

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #4
        Thanks so much for your responses! It makes me feel a bit better that it seems like I'm doing all I can for my girl. I had also asked my vet about draining or injecting a steroid and he advised against it. I'm new to the area and while my vet has come highly recommended as the best in the area, I still don't know him very well I wanted to make sure I was asking all the appropriate questions... especially since I'm not so familiar with this type of joint trauma.

        MCW - thanks for your suggestion on the shavings!! My filly *LOVES* her naps... which is how she did this in the first place. UGH
        I'm so busy I don't know if I found a rope or lost my horse

        Comment


        • #5
          My horse's is from grinding her hock into the ground. She is a world champion napper and has always been pasture boarded. When she is napping and starts to get uncomfortable on one side (or when she is rolling, because she can't roll her fat self over), instead of getting up, she sits up like a dog, then twists around and lays down on the other side! She is constantly banging up the poor hocks on the hard ground. Her mother does the same thing when she rolls, but not just for nap time!

          Comment


          • #6
            My 6 yo came to my with a capped hock this past Fall. I used a neoprene hock boot and tried "sweating" it. It reduced in size about 75%. Still looks a bit strange and my vet was actually surprised it worked...
            "The Horse: Friendship without envy, beauty without vanity, nobility without conceit, a willing partner, yet no slave."

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Snaffle81 View Post
              Some Background:

              My youngster capped her hock last Monday (05/24). On vet's advice I cold hosed and applied a poultice once a day until the heat went away - about three days. She also received a one dose (500 lbs - slightly below her actual weight) of banamine a night for two nights to help with the inflammation. Then my vet's advice was once the heat went away to apply DMSO to the area once a day. Vet also cautioned not to get discouraged because it could be a month before the hock started looking more normal.

              The vet has already seen her twice: First was about a day after the injury - checked the swelling to make sure it was in fact a capped hock (05/25). Then a couple days later (05/28) the vet thought it had improved and I jogged her for him - she was sound. The vet is coming out again this Wednesday where an xray will be taken just to confirm that there isn't any other damage that may require more aggressive treatment.

              My girl was never lame in the sense that her movement was uneven or she struggled to move. The first day or two she was at most a little stiff in the morning when coming out of her stall for the first time but quickly walked out of it. She would also trot and canter sound.

              The reason I'm posting is that I do not have experience with this type of joint trauma. Is there anything else I should doing? Questions I should be asking my vet? Has anyone had any experience using Back on Track's hock boots for this type of injury? I just want to be a good advocate for my girl to make sure this blemish will go down as much as possible. Thank you everyone for your guidance.


              deep beds and banked sides prevent sores to elbows and hocks / hips etc also help prevent horses getting cast

              try- hot poultice kayolin during the night then wash off and then do a mud pack which you can buy from naf naf, as in natural clay then was wash off and repeat for 3 days after that stop kayolin poultice and continue with mud clay dya nd night but clean and wash off
              if the capped hock is still squashy and not hard it will reduce it to almost normal
              both items above dont need bandages they aree applied sriaght on the skin
              around the whole area of the hock back and front and half way a bit down the cannon bone so your covering all of the hock,
              what it does - heat reduces swelling and draws out any infection if any there ie punchture wound the clay when appied is wet but drys so there fore tightens as it drys in other words pulls the skin tight washing of the product relases the pull or tight ness oncce back to normal then just do the clay at night for a coupple of days extra to prevent stocking up around thehock area

              takes 2/4 weeks to heal but will stress works very well if the capped hock is squashy to the touch i puffy if hard will only reduce to about half its size

              this is an old way to assist a capped hock or elbow to bring it almost to normal

              Comment


              • #8
                I DMSO's a capped hock on a youngster and it went down. I think your vet has told you right. It is worth doing all you can for it, becauses, while it is a harmless blemish, you have to look at it every day for ever.

                My young horse had a big kneee and x-rays showed the joint was not involved - I still went the extra mile with draining it, injecting it, and bandaging it and it completely went away - It was by no means a sure thing, but am so pleased I did it and don't have to look at it for ever.
                Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique

                Comment

                • Original Poster

                  #9
                  Originally posted by Foxtrot's View Post
                  I DMSO's a capped hock on a youngster and it went down. I think your vet has told you right. It is worth doing all you can for it, becauses, while it is a harmless blemish, you have to look at it every day for ever.

                  My young horse had a big kneee and x-rays showed the joint was not involved - I still went the extra mile with draining it, injecting it, and bandaging it and it completely went away - It was by no means a sure thing, but am so pleased I did it and don't have to look at it for ever.
                  I've been applying DMSO everyday and the vet was amazed at how much it's gone down in a week in a half. He was out to do x-rays on Wednesday and I just heard from him today about the result... Good news is that the tip of the calcaneus is fine but the bad news is that she has a hairline fracture about half way down. Vet emphasized that it was very very small and he wasn't even entirely sure it was a crack until he enhanced the x-rays (digital). He said that since she's so young that he wouldn't be concerned about it at all, especially since she's not lame and not sensitive to having her hock handled... I'll consider no kicking or any tantrum from a yearling filly good thing

                  Anyway, he said just keeping treating it as I have been and to keep her on individual turnout "for a good month" after she injured it. That too me means just over a month... so I'm going with at least 5 weeks. So while this was not the most ideal news, it's by no means the worst and I'm so glad I went with my gut and did the x-rays. Hopefully they'll be emailed to me in the next few days.

                  I appreciate the reassurance.
                  I'm so busy I don't know if I found a rope or lost my horse

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    We had a pony here that capped her hocks. We used ice initially then dmso 3X day. They went down a lot.

                    Important to find out why and prevent further trauma. Quite often it has nothing to do with bedding but caused by repetitive strain from stall kicking at night.


                    I finally discovered what the pony was doing. She wasn't kicking the wall byt was sort of bucking against the wall and hitting her hocks.

                    Comment

                    • Original Poster

                      #11
                      Originally posted by egontoast View Post
                      We had a pony here that capped her hocks. We used ice initially then dmso 3X day. They went down a lot.

                      Important to find out why and prevent further trauma. Quite often it has nothing to do with bedding but caused by repetitive strain from stall kicking at night.


                      I finally discovered what the pony was doing. She wasn't kicking the wall byt was sort of bucking against the wall and hitting her hocks.
                      I'm pretty sure my girl hurt herself while trying to get up from a nap and just banged her hock on the stall wall. The only preemptive measure I think I can do is have her shavings banked up more, though I think this time she was just too close to the wall. I don't know how I can really prevent it from happening again... I'm open to suggestions
                      I'm so busy I don't know if I found a rope or lost my horse

                      Comment

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