• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Ugh. Overly sensitive skin and "spur" marks- Update

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Ugh. Overly sensitive skin and "spur" marks- Update

    So, my darling horse, Vernon, really does like to keep me on my toes when it comes to his skin. He had a pretty good case of food related skin allergies (which we have under control, for the most part), and, for the most part, his sensitive skin is protected as best as I can with various saddle pads, girths, etc, etc, etc.

    I have had some issues with my spurs and him getting rubbed, but the worst has usually been when his skin has been at its worst and/or we've had a major come to Jesus. I have used those plastic roller spurs a great deal, and after the last big incident with rubs, I bought a new pair of small, very round metal ones (which did ok the couple of times I got to use them before all the snow).

    His skin does funny things, though, after a large percentage of my rides. There is often a small welt where my spur is, and/or the spot is sweaty (even if he's not sweaty at all). Now, I hardly wail on him with my spurs, but they are used to some degree in every ride.

    Anyway, to make this even more obnoxious, after not riding for 4 weeks because of snow, I have finally been able to at least get him out doing road work on our long drive. This is only walking, and, since he hasn't been ridden in awhile, I left the spurs in the tack room. Well, after the first ride (20-30 minutes of walking work), I got off to find a nice sweaty welt right where my spur would have been. The next day, as I was riding, my boss looked and deduced that possibly the edge of my chaps where rubbing him...but, seriously. Is he THAT sensitive that the bottom seam of my chaps leaves a welt?!?!

    I don't know if I'm looking for commiseration or advice. I'm thinking I'm going to have to break out some beach towels JUST to HACK my silly horse. Anyone have any experience with a horse THIS sensitive??
    Last edited by yellowbritches; Apr. 10, 2010, 07:56 AM.
    Amanda

  • #2
    My horse gets rubs from my half chaps too. Don't know what to tell you, but it is frustrating. I put aloe cream on the rubs, but I don't know if that helps or not. Let me guess, your horse is chestnut, right?

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #3
      No! Actually, he's a BAY! His vet says Vernon thinks he's a chestnut, though!
      Amanda

      Comment


      • #4
        That's funny! He does sound like he thinks he is chestnut! Sorry I'm not really any help on this...but I definitely understand how annoying it is!

        Comment


        • #5
          past horse came to me abused (waaay underweight, spur sores, etc)

          for a while I had to ride without any -- as his skin improved I moved to the kind with a ball-tip and those did not irritate

          eventually his skin got back to normal
          Nothing says "I love you" like a tractor. (Clydejumper)

          The reports states, “Elizabeth reported that she accidently put down this pony, ........, at the show.”

          Comment


          • #6
            I wonder if you could just put show sheen right there in that one spot? Or vaseline, but that might be gross. I feel your pain, though. My old mare was the same way, with the added bonus that the hair came back white, no matter how minor the rub!

            Comment

            • Original Poster

              #7
              Highflyer, I've done the vaseline a few times if he's had a bad time with rubs (when his skin was really bad this summer, he lost all his hair under my legs and had some really scaly nastiness in spots). It IS gross, and I don't recall it helping too much. The wierdest thing is the sweaty spots he gets where my spur or heel or whatever rubs him.
              Amanda

              Comment


              • #8
                Do you have him on any supplements for his skin??

                I have several sensitive skin guys. One chestnut...four white sock...what fun Other dark brown.

                I find keeping them on MSM seems to help. I also have them on Ultimate Finish (40) by Buckeye....but both are hard keepers so I use that to help keep weight on them.

                I also find that their skin gets worse when they are ulcery. Gotta love the sensitive ones.....
                ** Tact is the ability to tell someone to go to hell in such a way that they look forward to the trip. ~Winston Churchill? **

                Comment


                • #9
                  Bornfree you beat me to it!!

                  I had a horse boarded here that would rub out the top of his tail. Owner wanted to get him off steroids. I did a search on here and it seems that MSM and flax are highly recommended for sensitive/allergic/funky skin. Put that horse and my two on MSM and flax (I use Bioflax 20).

                  The boarder's horse did as well on the MSM/flax as he did on steriods, *maybe* even a little better.

                  My two are definitely better on the combo. Interestingly enough, my gelding (4 socks) has not had an incidence with scratches since I've put him on MSM/flax. Before that, I was constantly battling scratches on his legs.

                  Might be worth a try. MSM is inexpensive-maybe $5.00/month and Bioflax runs me about $20/month/horse.
                  http://thepitchforkchronicles.com

                  Comment

                  • Original Poster

                    #10
                    He is on SmartShine Ultra (he's actually the "cover boy" for that product in the newest Smartpak catalog! ) and it has helped the allergy side of things and some of the inflammation. I did have him on MSM for quite awhile as a 4 year old, but it did next to nothing for him. Now that we have the allergies under control, I could give it another try, though I HATE loading him up on sups he gets his fair share as it is, between his skin and his feet).

                    BFNE, interesting about the ulcers. He's actually getting scoped in the near future (I have a great vet and I'm scoring big time on THAT one!). He is currently on Tractguard and has been almost as long as I've had him, but I am switching him to the SmartDigest Ultra after seeing the benefits of Succeed on another horse and hearing the SmartDigest is comparable.
                    Amanda

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by yellowbritches View Post
                      BFNE, interesting about the ulcers. He's actually getting scoped in the near future (I have a great vet and I'm scoring big time on THAT one!). He is currently on Tractguard and has been almost as long as I've had him, but I am switching him to the SmartDigest Ultra after seeing the benefits of Succeed on another horse and hearing the SmartDigest is comparable.

                      Good luck. I've just put my guys on SmartDigest Ultra as well....they are currently on Gastroguard...hoping I can back off of that soon But think I'm sunk until we have grass again!
                      ** Tact is the ability to tell someone to go to hell in such a way that they look forward to the trip. ~Winston Churchill? **

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Do your boots have spur rests. One of mine would get rubs from my spur rests even if I left off my spurs.

                        As for spurs the only ones that never rubbed him were the big pessoa smooth rowels. Go figure.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The edge of my half chaps does the same thing. I couldn't figure out for the longest time what was causing those rubs! I have some cheapie field boots ordered and am hoping they'll be just as comfy.
                          Mon Ogon (Mo) and Those Wer the Days (Derby)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Same problem here. I have a dark bay (who's also super sensitive!) and he would get rubs from my half-chaps. I switched to tall boots exclusively and the rub marks went away. I can periodically ride with spurs and have no rub issues. If I have to wear spurs on a daily basis and I start to notice rubs, I use vaseline and I've found that it helps. It's messy though!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by yellowbritches View Post
                              . Anyone have any experience with a horse THIS sensitive??
                              Not a horse, but hound hunters (back in the day) used to use wet tea bags on their dogs pads - the tannins toughened up the skin. They'd used them on a footsore hound, and on hounds that just had to toughen up a bit.

                              It is harmless (though I suppose the tea might stain a white horse).

                              And I have absolutely no idea if this would cause a horse to test.

                              If you do decide to use tea bags - be advised that my grandmother (being very frugal) would holler at my grandfather if he used NEW tea bags. Used ones were fine - but being grandpa he always reached for the new ones.
                              Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
                              Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
                              -Rudyard Kipling

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Yep. My top horse had the most sensitive skin, and I had this exact problem. He would get rub marks from anything....girth, boots, halter, and even the tiniest spurs. I won't say they helped a lot, but I would put the products "New Skin" or runner's "Bodyglide" on any area that was prone to rub marks.
                                http://www.MyVirtualEventingCoach.com

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by yellowbritches View Post
                                  So, my darling horse, Vernon, really does like to keep me on my toes when it comes to his skin. He had a pretty good case of food related skin allergies (which we have under control, for the most part), and, for the most part, his sensitive skin is protected as best as I can with various saddle pads, girths, etc, etc, etc.

                                  I have had some issues with my spurs and him getting rubbed, but the worst has usually been when his skin has been at its worst and/or we've had a major come to Jesus. I have used those plastic roller spurs a great deal, and after the last big incident with rubs, I bought a new pair of small, very round metal ones (which did ok the couple of times I got to use them before all the snow).

                                  His skin does funny things, though, after a large percentage of my rides. There is often a small welt where my spur is, and/or the spot is sweaty (even if he's not sweaty at all). Now, I hardly wail on him with my spurs, but they are used to some degree in every ride.

                                  Anyway, to make this even more obnoxious, after not riding for 4 weeks because of snow, I have finally been able to at least get him out doing road work on our long drive. This is only walking, and, since he hasn't been ridden in awhile, I left the spurs in the tack room. Well, after the first ride (20-30 minutes of walking work), I got off to find a nice sweaty welt right where my spur would have been. The next day, as I was riding, my boss looked and deduced that possibly the edge of my chaps where rubbing him...but, seriously. Is he THAT sensitive that the bottom seam of my chaps leaves a welt?!?!

                                  I don't know if I'm looking for commiseration or advice. I'm thinking I'm going to have to break out some beach towels JUST to HACK my silly horse. Anyone have any experience with a horse THIS sensitive??

                                  hes getting spur marks more so as sounds like you have over active legs and what you dont realise is with an active leg its constant banging on the sides of the horse and in the end will be dead to the leg
                                  be better for you and the horse if you rode him without spurs and you leanrt to have a still secure leg rather than an over active leg

                                  so go back to basics and learn how to use your legs properly
                                  do more exercises working with out sitrrups -
                                  Last edited by goeslikestink; Feb. 28, 2010, 06:59 PM.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    I feel for you, I have had sensitive ones in the past, but it sounds like your cute guy (love the Smart Pak photo) is ultra sensitive.

                                    I really cinch galled a grey, thin skinned reined cowhorse (a hot bred Arabian mare) one time, 25 years ago, three days before an important championship, and was doing everything I could to relieve the soreness and puffiness...an old timer, and mentor of mine walked into his tack room and came out with a jar of Comfrey gel, which I smeared on liberally for the next 24 hours, every time I could, and the tenderness, rubbed looking spots, and redness went away! It was like night and day. In my horse's case, it was hot weather combined with sandy arena, and schooling too much in anticipation of a big show...your case is definately not the work or riding related, sounds like. But if you can find some comfrey gel, it is mild and cooling for the time being.

                                    Frustrating when you are doing everything right, though, and have this kind of thing...hope something works soon!
                                    What would you try if you knew you would not fail?

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      If your horse is being marked by your spurs or by chaps then it's a simple fact that you're riding with incorrect leg position.

                                      You're obviously riding with your heels on him all the time from what you say and I'm thinking you're probably moving him with your heels. Personally speaking, if you were a pupil of mine, I wouldn't allow you to wear spurs until you'd got that matter addressed.

                                      It's good lessons you need to tackle root cause, not skin supplements and things to treat symptoms.

                                      Comment

                                      • Original Poster

                                        #20
                                        Thanks to those who haven't turned this into a riding lesson and have offered at the very least sympathy and some things to try. I know what I'm doing AND I'm "supervised" so I am 99.9999% sure my riding is NOT the issue. This horse IS that sensitive.

                                        lstevenson, I actually have a ton of Chammois Butter (for cycling), so I may give that a go. Better than vaseline, too, since it isn't sticky-gooby.

                                        I hacked him yesterday in my squishy soft Dubarry boots (I was in a rush). Won't do THAT again.

                                        I was wondering out loud last night if clipping him will help or make it worse. He was clipped in October, but with all our cold, nasty, unrideable weather, I have yet to clip him again. Part of me is wondering if he's more sensitive than usual with shedding and his shaggy coat.
                                        Amanda

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X