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Feeding Oil - should you always use corn oil, or can you use others?

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  • Feeding Oil - should you always use corn oil, or can you use others?

    My gelding was recently diagnosed with PSSM after a muscle biopsy, so we're cutting grain and adding lots of oil/fat to his diet. I've been using Corn oil so far, but at this volume, it looks like some other oils could be cheaper... so, do I need to stick to corn oil, or can others be used, too? If so, which ones?

    Also, does anyone here have good tips on where to buy oil in bulk?
    Work - feed - ride - shovel poop - repeat.

  • #2
    It depends on how anxious you are about the Great Omega-6 Debate. IMO it's all a little overblown, but the jury is still decidedly OUT. Calorically, fat is pretty much fat. If what you are buying is of good quality and is palatable to the horse, you're probably OK going with whatever is out there. If you know you're going to be using a fair amount and can keep it properly (not too warm, not too cold, protected from light and air) maybe a restaurant supply would be a good place to look.
    Click here before you buy.

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    • Original Poster

      #3
      Originally posted by deltawave View Post
      It depends on how anxious you are about the Great Omega-6 Debate. IMO it's all a little overblown, but the jury is still decidedly OUT.
      Yes, I just skimmed that thread. I'll see what my vet has to say about it next time we talk, but I'm not overly concerned about that yet. I have enough horse nutrition concerns to obcess about already.
      Work - feed - ride - shovel poop - repeat.

      Comment


      • #4
        No advice on type, just on where to buy...

        I buy bulk oil in a five gallon container for about $25 from Cash and Carry when possible, and in 1.25 gallon jugs for about $7.50 at Costco if absolutely necessary.

        Comment


        • #5
          Since corn oil IS high in O6, and since O6 DOES cause an inflammatory response, then since it MIGHT be of a concern to a horse prone to inflammation issues, it's not something *I* would use

          Costco/Sam's 4 gallon containers are soybean oil, and last I looked it was in the $15-ish range. You can even get pumps to use, instead of pouring.
          ______________________________
          The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

          Comment

          • Original Poster

            #6
            Originally posted by costco_muffins View Post
            No advice on type, just on where to buy...

            I buy bulk oil in a five gallon container for about $25 from Cash and Carry when possible, and in 1.25 gallon jugs for about $7.50 at Costco if absolutely necessary.
            What type of oil is it that you get at Cash and Carry?
            Work - feed - ride - shovel poop - repeat.

            Comment

            • Original Poster

              #7
              Originally posted by JB View Post
              Since corn oil IS high in O6, and since O6 DOES cause an inflammatory response, then since it MIGHT be of a concern to a horse prone to inflammation issues, it's not something *I* would use

              Costco/Sam's 4 gallon containers are soybean oil, and last I looked it was in the $15-ish range. You can even get pumps to use, instead of pouring.
              So soybean oil is ok then? 4 gallons for $15-ish sounds way better than the 2.5 gal of corn oil I'm getting now for $16-ish (at Costco - which didn't seem like much when I was just feeding him a splash with grain, but now that I'm feeding him 2 cups a day it adds up!).

              I recently found a great 2.5 gal container at Walmart ($6-7), it's clear and has a nice big opening to fill with. It uses a spiggot, like on a gatorade container, to release the oil which has been working great so far. I had a pump before, but this seems to work much better for such a high volume. I also like that you can easily see when it's getting low.
              Work - feed - ride - shovel poop - repeat.

              Comment


              • #8
                Soy or canola are both usually cheaper than corn oil, and they are just fine to feed. Been using them for years with my EPSM boy.

                BN

                Comment


                • #9
                  I just started feeding corn oil to one of my horses to add fat/calories to his diet (not EPSM, just tends to be slightly thinner than he should be). My vet, who may not be up on the very latest research or catalog controversies, said to always use corn, corn, corn, corn because she thinks it works the best in her experience. So, I dunno. For now, I'm feeding him corn oil. I bought a small vat of it at Costco last weekend.
                  Visit the County Island, home of Whiskey the ranch horse: http://countyisland.wordpress.com
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                  • #10
                    Cocosoya from uckele.com is worth a try. You also can add fat to the diet with a flax supplement like Omega Fields HorseShine, available now at Tractor Supply if your feed store does not carry it. Omegatin, Nutrina Empower, or Purina's Amplify may also be worth looking into, high fat solid supplements rather than oil.
                    Last edited by sdlbredfan; Feb. 17, 2010, 04:36 PM. Reason: add content
                    Jeanie
                    RIP Sasha, best dog ever, pictured shortly before she died, Death either by euthanasia or natural causes is only the end of the animal inhabiting its body; I believe the spirit lives on.

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                    • #11
                      Calorie wise oil is oil, but....

                      Originally posted by Live2Jump View Post
                      My gelding was recently diagnosed with PSSM after a muscle biopsy, so we're cutting grain and adding lots of oil/fat to his diet. I've been using Corn oil so far, but at this volume, it looks like some other oils could be cheaper... so, do I need to stick to corn oil, or can others be used, too? If so, which ones?

                      Also, does anyone here have good tips on where to buy oil in bulk?
                      NOT all fats are equal. I would avoid corn oil myself, as it is higher in Omega 6s than other oils and definitely higher than flax oil. BUT flax oil is very expensive, so I prefer to use whole flax or flax ground immediately prior to the meal. Flax is 40% fat and it is a much healthier fat than the corn oil.

                      So if you are not concerned with Omega 3s and 6s and just want calories then any oil is fine. Canola, soy or corn.

                      Don't use linseed oil or palm kernel oil though.

                      Yours
                      'MW
                      Melyni (PhD) PAS, Dipl. ACAN.
                      Sign up for the Equine nutrition enewsletter on www.foxdenequine.com
                      New edition of book is out:
                      Horse Nutrition Handbook.

                      www.knabstruppers4usa.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I use vegetable oil or sunflower oil and choice depends on what's cheapest when I go to the cash and carry and buy 5 gallon drums of it.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Melyni View Post
                          NOT all fats are equal. I would avoid corn oil myself, as it is higher in Omega 6s than other oils and definitely higher than flax oil. BUT flax oil is very expensive, so I prefer to use whole flax or flax ground immediately prior to the meal. Flax is 40% fat and it is a much healthier fat than the corn oil.

                          So if you are not concerned with Omega 3s and 6s and just want calories then any oil is fine. Canola, soy or corn.

                          Don't use linseed oil or palm kernel oil though.

                          Yours
                          'MW
                          Raw Linseed oil and flax seed oil are exactly the same thing - in their pure forms.

                          The linseed oil you find in the hardware store when mixed with solvents is called Boiled Linseed Oil even though it is not really boiled. The solvents cause it to dry faster and it is for finishing wood, you would not want to feed this to a horse.

                          Flax seed oil by any name is not cheap and even the food grade kind is mixed with something else, other oils - soy or rice bran, since flax oil is unstable. Has to be cold pressed, has to be kept in a dark or opaque container since light destroys the nutrients in it and probably makes it go bad as well.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I use soy oil that I get in 15 gallon jugs from my feed supplier. It is the same oil he feeds to his TB racers and broodmares-- though his broodmares were not bred last year because of the bad economy. Lots of his customers buy this oil instead of processed corn oils from Wall-Mart, which is the cheapest place around here to buy corn or vegetable oils that have bee processed for human consumption.

                            He has the oil bottled in five-gallon jugs in the summer because it will go rancid if not used quickly, especially in the humid heat here.

                            At first, I used it only for the Percherons because I had read they needed to get a higher percentage of calories from fats than light horse breeds. I started using it regularly after I had gotten the first Percheron in October 2008. Before that, I had used corn oil to help "pick up" a horse that came in "poor." I did start using it on one of my older TWHs last winter-- the 19 year old.

                            But this winter, I started adding some to everyone's feed, too. Their coats and hooves have never looked better, and they don't seem to be eating as much hay as in the past-- but they still need lots of it in the winter.

                            All of my horses are age 12 and above now except the Paso Fino that I am probably going to lease out this spring. He was a $200 "save" from a slaughter auction three years ago this month. Though he is only five now, he gets his soy oil in his feed like the rest.
                            Laissez les bons temps rouler!
                            Elysian Fields Farm--
                            --An equine refuge

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Since I avoid feeding corn to my overly sensitive guy, I won't do the corn oil. I have been buying Canola at Walmart for $5 (and change) and using a 1 oz. pump from the feed store. I found, at least for my pump, that the opening on the bottle has to be of the smaller variety. Walmart's is perfect! Plus, using the pump elminiates needing to "measure" with a cup. Messy!!!!!

                              I am going to hit up BJs or Sam's Club and scope out the soy oil when I get a chance.
                              Gone gaited....

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I feed canola and usually just buy it at the supermarket because I'm lazy (and costco is way out of my way)...
                                but there was a time when a friend and I used to go to Sam's Club and get the biggest things of oil they would sell...for like 7 horses...

                                yep, standing in line, two young women in britches, two shopping carts FILLED with nothing but oil.

                                We got some good sidelong looks.
                                The big man -- my lost prince

                                The little brother, now my main man

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by asterix View Post
                                  yep, standing in line, two young women in britches, two shopping carts FILLED with nothing but oil.
                                  Yeah, that'll get you some looks. I know from experience. That's why I go with Pick n' Pull these days. You order it online, they bring it up to the customer service register and email you that it's ready, you pay at customer service and wheel it out. Much faster and easier on my back.

                                  I pay $18.43 for 18.3 quarts of soybean oil at my local Sam's. For those who are doing the math, that's $4.03 per gallon, and it's 4.575-gallon containers. The price is creeping up slowly (it was $17 last year) but it still beats grocery store prices.

                                  ETA I keep the majority of this stuff in my house and carry out a single gallon about once a week. Helps keep it fresh. Most liquid oils have a 6-month shelf life, so if you find a screamin' deal or you have the storage space, stock up during the sales.

                                  If you enter your zip code at samsclub.com, it will usually show you the local pickup price.
                                  Last edited by jn4jenny; Feb. 17, 2010, 09:15 PM.
                                  Head Geek at The Saddle Geek Blog http://www.thesaddlegeek.com/

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    DOES cause an inflammatory response
                                    See, I'm completely unconvinced that this can be stated so dogmatically, and even if it can, I'm unconvinced that it means diddly squat clinically, as opposed to in a laboratory or a blood tube. Inflammation, after all, is beneficial and necessary in the right measure.
                                    Click here before you buy.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      I didn't say inflammation was necessarily bad Has it not been proven that O3 is anti-inflammatory and O6 is pro-inflammatory? That was my only point. The issue in horses is that it has not been proven to be detrimental. There are still people who are pretty adamant that their arthritic horse (ie having inflammation issues) moved better after taking him off corn oil or boss (also high in O6).
                                      ______________________________
                                      The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Veggie (soy) oil works fine for me, it's cheaper and I'm all about the calories, coat and reducing the carbs so it fits the bill. Plus I think veggie oil is less likely to go rancid in the summer heat (although at 1.5 cups a day, it's not really a worry for me since I but walmart gallon jugs).

                                        When I had more horses on it I used the costco 35lb jugs, but for now walmart or kroger is more convenient.
                                        Your crazy is showing. You might want to tuck that back in.

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