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Rain Rot Under Blanket?

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  • Rain Rot Under Blanket?

    Just to preface, this condition was noticed today and the vet is coming out tomorrow to examine but I wanted to get some instant feedback...

    My 16 y.o. mare (tb x wb) moved home to NH in July and now lives with 3 other horses with no other equine contact. They go in at night and are well monitored (groomed, fed, mucked out, etc.). She has no preexisting medical conditions but is prone to scratches on her white legs in the spring. She has been wearing a heavy Rambo for at least the last month (it has been well below freezing the entire time) and was groomed last less than a week ago but...

    Today when I took her blanket off, the left side of her back is covered in scabs from withers to point of hip. The scabs appear larger than rain rot I have seen in the past and this obviously developed VERY quickly.

    So, my question is: has anyone ever heard of rain rot developing under blankets? The blankets were laundered in the fall and are totally waterproof. I also don't think that she has been over blanketed as it has been arctic up here!

    Thanks for any feedback!
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals" Immanuel Kant
  • Original Poster

    #2
    CROSS POST: Rain Rot Under Blanket?

    Because I appreciate the knowledge of those who frequent the Eventing MB I thought I would ask...

    Just to preface, this condition was noticed today and the vet is coming out tomorrow to examine but I wanted to get some instant feedback...

    My 16 y.o. mare (tb x wb) moved home to NH in July and now lives with 3 other horses with no other equine contact. They go in at night and are well monitored (groomed, fed, mucked out, etc.). She has no preexisting medical conditions but is prone to scratches on her white legs in the spring. She has been wearing a heavy Rambo for at least the last month (it has been well below freezing the entire time) and was groomed last less than a week ago but...

    Today when I took her blanket off, the left side of her back is covered in scabs from withers to point of hip. The scabs appear larger than rain rot I have seen in the past and this obviously developed VERY quickly.

    So, my question is: has anyone ever heard of rain rot developing under blankets? The blankets were laundered in the fall and are totally waterproof. I also don't think that she has been over blanketed as it has been arctic up here!

    Thanks for any feedback!
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals" Immanuel Kant

    Comment


    • #3
      Happens all the time...think of how well those nasty little buggers will multiply when trapped in a warm, moist, low oxygen environment (everything you get under a heavy waterproof blanket.)

      If she had the organism on her skin before the blanket went on, all it takes is one tiny tiny abrasion to let it go buck wild.

      Sorry and good luck!

      Comment


      • #4
        Most likely a fungal infection. It has something to do with them breaking a sweat under the blanket and this is the aftermath. Wash the blanket before you put it back on her and treat with anti fungals. My favorite is Fungasol ointment but just about anything should do the trick.
        McDowell Racing Stables

        Home Away From Home

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        • Original Poster

          #5
          thanks!
          "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals" Immanuel Kant

          Comment


          • #6
            If it were summer or it had been wet where you are, I'd say rain rot. But since it's the dead of winter, my vote is for ringworm. My otherwise-healthy and not-prone-to-fungal-ickies horse got it on his face last week. Ringworm spores thrive in winter conditions, especially when the horse gets limited UV exposure. Add in some moisture (like sweat) and voila, fungal nasties.

            Try Googling for pictures of "ringworm in horses" and compare it to what you've got.
            Head Geek at The Saddle Geek Blog http://www.thesaddlegeek.com/

            Comment


            • #7
              Three applications of M-T-G will cure either one.

              CSSJR

              Comment


              • #8
                I would use Muck Itch as it's always been hands down faster and better than MTG.
                Where Norwegian Fjords Rule
                http://www.ironwood-farm.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  Yes it's extremely common to develop under a rug. It's one of the reasons why my equine vet says he can take an extra holiday every year.... owners with rugged horses and resultant associated skin bacterial invations.

                  Note that it's got nothing to do with rain or mud either! If it were then every horse in the UK would be constantly plagued by it. They're not. But oh boy do we have some challenges to manage!

                  So first off its actually bacterial caused by the invasion of a bacterium called dermatophilus congolensis, which penetrates the skin following either damage, or softening through exposure to the wet or mud or sweating or rubbing under a rug and then it can be highly invasive and spread.

                  Treatment aim is to kill the bacteria with topical application that gets rid of it and its its got particularly bad then antibiotics will also be administered. Here tells you more:

                  http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/sh...us#post3931050

                  It's not just about when you last washed your rug. It's about how often it's lifted right off and dried and changed. It's about how often the horse is groomed and cleaned and checked underneath it's rug. It's about daily inspection and ensuring that underneath the rug isn't dank, moist and dark. It's about ensuring that you don't unwittingly allow the perfect environment for anaerobic bacteria.

                  If it's really bad or persistent then antibiotics are best administered.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Holy Mackeril, you said a mothfull.

                    I have T/Os w/O rugs some get it some don't. I have horses with rigs who have it and some who don't.

                    I was all rugs w/ Antifungal and Sun dry before storage and sun air out before putting on for winter.

                    I used to go so far as to bring in all the TO's and give them deep hot baths w/ anti-fungal shampoo dry and wait 2 days then put on rugs...HA some still got it.

                    My thinnest skinned chestnut newbie 1st winter out tore his waterproof and got soaked in a heavey downpour. He lost rights to the rug and his coat is fine, but a tough bay warrior got it for the 1st time ever go figure.........

                    Comment

                    • Original Poster

                      #11
                      Thanks for the feedback, all.

                      Vet will be out today. Let's hope for a swift recovery!
                      "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals" Immanuel Kant

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Maybe a heavyweight Rambo is too warm for your area? I start using a heavyweight when temps drop below 20F. (a medium weight above 20F) I live north of you and find that the Rambo Heavyweight is good to -30F for my thin skinned TB genotype horse.

                        I've never had a horse *knock on wood* get anything nasty under a blanket and I've never even heard of it IRL.

                        I did have trouble with one particular blanket that didn't breathe well and would create moisture under the blanket, but I tossed it out before it could create problems.

                        What temp is your barn at night? Depending on the temp of the barn I'll switch blankets at night so they don't get overheated. I also don't reblanket directly after exercise with the blanket they normally wear. I put on a wool cooler under a medium Rambo to keep them warm and make sure they're 100% dry before putting back on the heavyweight Rambo.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          We merged your two threads on this topic back together in Horse Care. We try to avoid cross posting of the same topics to multiple forums, as it can lead to redundancy and extra threads for us to manage and host.

                          Thanks!
                          Mod 1

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I highly recommend Equiderma for healing rain rot. It works faster than any other product I have ever used for it.
                            There are friends and faces that may be forgotten, but there are horses that never will be. - Andy Adams

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Here in the south where it's humid no matter the season we are well familiar with rain rot under blankets. I have changed my blanketing routine with one mare since she seems very prone to developing this ugliness. It's no fun and can make a horse sore. Sometimes a two week course of SMGs will take care of the situation. The equine vet practice I used sends out a newsletter and addressed that most rain rot is bacterial. I'm not in total agreement but if daily application of anti-fungal spray/ointment/gel isn't doable the SMGs may be a good alternative. Oh to have the budget to afford two blankets for each horse.
                              Susan B.
                              http://canterberrymeadows.com/

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Learn something new every day. It has been very rainy here in NC this winter and I have noticed a couple of the retirees had rainrot under their blankets, which I blanketed them to prevent!! I ought to just body clip everyone......!

                                Jennifer
                                Third Charm Event Team

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Dermatophilosis: Introduction
                                  ( Dermatophilus infection, Cutaneous streptothrichosis, Lumpy wool, Strawberry footrot)

                                  This infection of the epidermis, which is seen worldwide but is more prevalent in the tropics, is also erroneously called mycotic dermatitis. The lesions are characterized by exudative dermatitis with scab formation. Dermatophilus congolensis has a wide host range. Among domestic animals, cattle, sheep, goats, and horses are affected most frequently; and pigs, dogs, and cats rarely. It is commonly called cutaneous streptothrichosis in cattle, goats, and horses; in sheep, it is termed lumpy wool when the wooled areas of the body are affected. Infection in camel herds has been related to drought and poverty. Recent isolates from chelonids may represent a new species of Dermatophilus . The few human cases reported usually have been associated with handling diseased animals.

                                  Etiology, Transmission, and EpidemiologyPathogenesis:
                                  To establish infection, the infective zoospores must reach a skin site where the normal protective barriers are reduced or deficient. The respiratory efflux of low concentrations of carbon dioxide from the skin attracts the motile zoospores to susceptible areas on the skin surface. Zoospores germinate to produce hyphae, which penetrate into the living epidermis and subsequently spread in all directions from the initial focus. Hyphal penetration causes an acute inflammatory reaction. Natural resistance to the acute infection is due to phagocytosis of the infective zoospores, but once infection is established, there is little or no immunity. In most acute infections, the filamentous invasion of the epidermis ceases in 2-3 wk, and the lesions heal spontaneously. In chronic infections, the affected hair follicles and scabs are sites from which intermittent invasions of noninfected hair follicles and epidermis occur. The invaded epithelium cornifies and separates in the form of a scab. In wet scabs, moisture enhances the proliferation and release of zoospores from hyphae. The high carbon dioxide concentration produced by the dense population of zoospores accelerates their escape to the skin surface, thus completing the unique life cycle.

                                  Clinical Findings
                                  Dermatophilosis is seen in animals at all ages but is most prevalent in the young, animals chronically exposed to moisture, and immunosuppressed hosts. Lesions on a host can vary from acute to chronic. Age, sex, and breed do not seem to affect host susceptibility. Pruritus is variable. Most affected animals recover spontaneously within 3 wk of the initial infection ( provided that chronic maceration of the skin does not occur). In general, the onset of dry weather speeds healing. Uncomplicated skin lesions heal without scar formation. These infections usually have little effect on general health. Animals with severe generalized infections often lose condition, and movement and prehension are difficult if the feet, lips, and muzzle are severely affected; these animals are often sent to slaughter as incurable. Deaths occasionally occur, particularly in calves and lambs, because of generalized disease with or without secondary bacterial infection and secondary fly or screwworm infestation. The primary economic consequences are damaged hides in cattle, wool loss in sheep, and lameness and loss of performance in horses when severely affected around the pastern area.

                                  Lesions:Treatment and Control:
                                  Because acutely infected animals usually heal rapidly and spontaneously, treatment is indicated only for cosmetic reasons in food-producing animals. Treatment is recommended in horses because these lesions interfere with use and are painful. Organisms are susceptible to a wide range of antimicrobials—erythromycin, spiramycin, penicillin G, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, amoxicillin, tetracyclines, and novobiocin.Usually, chronic infections can be rapidly and effectively cured with a single IM injection of procaine penicillin (22,000 IU/kg) and streptomycin (22 mg/kg). If this fails, the penicillin-streptomycin combination can be administered for 5 days, or a single injection of long-acting oxytetracycline (20 mg/kg) can be substituted.In horses, the lesions should be gently soaked and removed. Topical antibacterial shampoo therapy is effective as adjuvant therapy. Chlorhexidine and benzoyl peroxide are recommended. In food-producing animals, topical applications of lime sulfur are a cost-effective adjuvant to antibacterial therapy. Insecticides applied externally are frequently used to control biting insects.Isolating clinically affected animals, culling affected animals, and controlling ectoparasites are methods used to break the infective cycle.
                                  http://merckvetmanual.com/mvm/index....m/bc/70600.htm
                                  ... _. ._ .._. .._

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Equibrit - A while back you suggested rinsing with diluted Nolvasan. One of my horses had a tendency towards rain rot and I had tried all sorts of crap to get rid of it - also consulted my vet, etc.

                                    Never considered using Nolvasan - and WOW - gone in one application. Didn't come back.
                                    Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
                                    Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
                                    -Rudyard Kipling

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      I have always had that result - needless to say - I think folks must either ignore the advice posted, or just don't read older threads. This topic just keeps returning - it must be worthy of a permanent thread !
                                      (Chlorhexedine = Nolvasan = Hibiclens = Hibistat)
                                      ... _. ._ .._. .._

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        I had a horse come in here with a blanket on - plus a nice infestation of lice.
                                        Don't think the blanket had been moved for a very long time.
                                        Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique

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