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Stupid new horse has mud fever-yet another complete waste of time

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  • Stupid new horse has mud fever-yet another complete waste of time

    Some of you may remember the mare with the scary hock x-rays I decided to take a chance on. Her hocks are fine-but she developed mud fever after 4 days of buying her. Yes, it's muddy and gross everywhere, but the other 12 horses don't have it, and she was in equally wet conditions at her old barn. She's not lame-I don't know how-it's hard to tell pastern from cannon she's so swollen. And the forecast is more rain Wed-Sat to add to the cesspool of a farm that hasn't dried yet from the last two weeks of rain.

    I can't even begin to explain how absolutely disgusted I am with horses in general right now. It's certainly not her fault, but it's not going to get any drier where I board nor is there anyone there to help manage it so once it's cleared up she'll be back up for sale. Yet another horse with zero issues until I buy it-this one's first vet bill will be after 10 days. What a joke. It just proves once again, that I shouldn't own a horse. Only posting because the moron I live with just reminded me that the vet told me not to buy her-and it's the best distraction I can think of so said moron remains injury free.
    "Those who know the least often know it the loudest."

  • #2
    Agree, you definitely should not own a horse.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Equine Studies View Post
      Some of you may remember the mare with the scary hock x-rays I decided to take a chance on. Her hocks are fine-but she developed mud fever after 4 days of buying her. Yes, it's muddy and gross everywhere, but the other 12 horses don't have it, and she was in equally wet conditions at her old barn. She's not lame-I don't know how-it's hard to tell pastern from cannon she's so swollen. And the forecast is more rain Wed-Sat to add to the cesspool of a farm that hasn't dried yet from the last two weeks of rain.

      I can't even begin to explain how absolutely disgusted I am with horses in general right now. It's certainly not her fault, but it's not going to get any drier where I board nor is there anyone there to help manage it so once it's cleared up she'll be back up for sale. Yet another horse with zero issues until I buy it-this one's first vet bill will be after 10 days. What a joke. It just proves once again, that I shouldn't own a horse. Only posting because the moron I live with just reminded me that the vet told me not to buy her-and it's the best distraction I can think of so said moron remains injury free.
      Okay, so it'll be cleared up. And then you're going to sell her. Because she had mud fever.

      Is anyone else a little confused here? There's a lot of reasons I'd sell a horse. Didn't click personality wise, horse had bad habits, was neurotic. But once had mudfever? Erm. Okay...if you say so.

      Comment


      • #4
        Do only the stupid ones get it?

        I hope she gets a new home, soon.
        "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
        ---
        The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.

        Comment


        • #5
          Let's not all gang up on the OP because she used the word 'stupid' or is frustrated because of mud fever. I've had the same sort of year. Injury after injury, problem after problem, and I don't even ride! My horses are pasture pets. Sometimes it just feels good to vent.


          To the OP, did her feed change after you bought her by any chance? Some horses are just more susceptible to it. If she just moved to a new barn and her whole life just changed, the stress could have dropped her immune system a bit to make her more susceptible. Shit happens. I've got one horse that's had it for two months. None of my other horses have it. However, he's also been on a new food for two months. So, I'm removing the new food and going back to straight beet pulp to see if that clears it up. I have a suspicion of what he may *possibly* be allergic to in the new food as I have two other horses allergic to it. I haven't battled it for years. I also haven't battled abscesses for over 10 years and have dealt with two so far this year. Had a horse impale himself on a T-post severing a nerve. I thought I was going to lose him. Yeah, there are some days I think I shouldn't own horses either. It gets tough. I'm not gonna sell them because it gets tough. But I sure wish I could catch a break.

          Comment

          • Original Poster

            #6
            Despite my obviously frustrated thread title, she is not stupid-the weather is stupid, the boarding situation for this mare must be stupid since she's the one out of 13 horses that is affected, and I'm obviously stupid for thinking I might have better luck this time (after 4 years of nothing going right-broken splints and surgery, death due to a freak pasture accident where the mare fell and inpaled herself on a branch and bled out, allergies, another broken splint from a kick in the field, a foal that needed to be pulled then resuscitated because she hadn't turned and was presenting hind legs first, then had to be splinted for badly crooked legs, now 2 years old with OCD chips everywhere). And that's only 3 different horses. I have the black cloud-some people have good luck-I have the exact opposite-the worst that can happen, happens to me and any horse that has the misfortune of having me as an owner. That's just how it is. Anyone who has had a similar slump over four years will understand that the original post was written in complete and utter frustration, anyone who hasn't, will just think I'm the world's biggest jerk. Which is fine, because right now I just don't care.

            Thought I was being smart buying a mare I know who has had zero issues, and I mean zero, in the 3 years I've known her. Not a lame step, no vet bills, nothing. As soon as I bring her home, here we go. It's unbelievable really. I don't mind dealing with stuff-been there done that. From September to March I got up at 5:00 am, drove to the barn before work and mucked a stall because my two year old kept getting injured in the herd, so had her own turnout in the riding ring in the day time, but no shelter at night so we had to bring her in. Sometimes mucked it twice a day if she couldn't go out at all. I've put in more time, money and effort than anyone I know trying to keep horses sound, healthy and alive, for that matter. But once in a while I'd just like to go to the barn and enjoy my horse(s), hard to do when it seems like every day is just another chore. I'm not that selfish, I don't expect zero maintenance, but I also don't want 100% maintenance, all day, every day. Which has been my horse life for basically the past 4 years.

            I board at a private barn, owner works full time. No barn staff. Any veterinary care I have to do myself. Even if I could get there twice a day to clean, dry and medicate the legs, there's not much point anyway, they are back in the mud. The barn is super wet as it is on very low land. Spring and fall are going to be a nightmare for this horse.

            Bottom line is I can't manage this mare where I board if she's always going to be prone to mud fever-there is only outdoor board. Even if I was willing to clean stalls every day again for as long as I own her, she really can't live inside anyway (weaves and cribs even with another horse in with her). In theory this board set up was perfect for her, and she was perfect for me riding wise-it took me 6 months of horse hunting to find her, a lot of convincing on a lot of people's part to make me take a chance on another horse, and a mere 4 days to realize it probably won't work out. I suppose I could just keep her, leave her in the mud with hot, sore, swollen legs, and bond with her every day by picking at them and getting my head kicked in. Sounds like good times.

            So that hopefully sums up what "stupid new horse has mud fever" really means.
            "Those who know the least often know it the loudest."

            Comment


            • #7
              Take a deep breath. It looks like you have a lot of issues. But taking out your frustration on this mare will not help.

              Have you had all your horses in this barn-if so maybe the barn does not have great service??

              But please if my horse had mud fever, I would be deeply concerned and not mad at her. I was planning a 4 day camping trip in the NV high desert last year and my mare who is always fine, cut her leg in pasture two weeks before the trip. Her leg was all swollen and it was just scary. Did that whole bandages and two times a day antibiotics for two weeks thingie. I had to cancel , but I was so worried about the mare not mad at her!!

              So you got a new horse and she got mud fever. Otherwise she seems to be ok. Can you find a new barn? Is money an issue(nothing wrong wih that) . Find a situation that works for you time , effort and money wise and move on-being angry and frustrated will only cloud your judgement .

              Comment


              • #8
                You probably have more choices than you think, besides either sell her, or keep her in mud all the time.
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                Comment

                • Original Poster

                  #9
                  I don't mind the ganging up, it's what I expected when I posted this vent-made me feel better to hit the keyboard. That's one of the things this BB is best known for. Doesn't bother me a bit-especially not from people who don't know anything about me or my situation.

                  Anyway, jaimebaker-I completely agree with you about stress and the food-my first thoughts actually-she's intense and nervous in general (the cribbing and weaving are a dead giveaway!). I made that concession in exchange for being able to ride a completely safe, sane, get on and ride eventer, which this mare is. She isn't even a bad cribber to begin with, at least her teeth don't show it, and she hasn't really been even trying since the first few days-at least that we have seen. She went from being the complete bottom of a herd of three to a weanling and my two year old, and seems much happier overall.

                  My other thought was a food allergy-I'd been slowly weaning her off a high energy competition type feed onto the same ration balancer the two year old is on. Vet hasn't heard of any allergies to this one but you just never know I guess. Would I ever be thrilled if it were the new food-only time will tell I suppose. But if it's not any of those things, at least there were enough people waiting in line behind me to buy her, so it won't be hard to find her a new home at all. Lots of drier farms out there.
                  "Those who know the least often know it the loudest."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Mud fever isn't always a chronic thing. Sometimes it can be diet-related. Just like thrush. Try cutting the sugars and starches, and maybe adding a supplement with zinc and copper.

                    If it's not cracked or bleeding, you can use vinegar to help clear up the mud fever. Just sponge it on and then let it dry.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      ES, I am sympathetic to your frustration. It does sound like you've had really awful luck. Is there another boarding situation you could try that has more high ground for her and barn staff to help you take care of her?

                      Some horses, when moved onto new soil, will have a reaction to the different components in that soil. For instance, mine breaks out in fist-sized hives after the first rain in a new place, I give him Benadryl for two days, and then he's adjusted and he's fine. Before you decide she is prone to mud fever, you might give her time to adjust to her new zip code and the new soil, as well as the new diet program. When she acclimates to all the changes in her life, she may well be just fine and prove to be the horse who breaks your run of bad luck and injuries. Best of luck to you and her!
                      "I'm not always sarcastic. Sometimes I'm asleep." - Harry Dresden

                      Amy's Stuff - Rustic chic and country linens and decor
                      Support my mom! She's gotta finance her retirement horse somehow.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I'd be a bit concerned in general if this barn is as wet as you claim it to be.. even if the others don't have mud fever, standing around in a ton of water/muck/mud isn't healthy for a horse in general.

                        I also agree selling a horse over a bit of rainrot seems quite extreme. My mare occasionally gets a touch of rainrot here or there.. not a big deal. At all.
                        Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!

                        Comment

                        • Original Poster

                          #13
                          Issues, nothing but issues.

                          Not too many other options where I am-with the two year old's multiple leg issues, she stocks up and is lame if kept in a stall.

                          Anywhere else with pasture board (with or without an arena) the horses are all out in a group. The two year old will run through the fence if chased at all, which we found out the hard way-two months of cleaning, draining and bandaging the wounds from that, and then the cleaning stalls all winter so she could turn out by herself until spring when they built a new all wood paddock for her, the barn owner's weanling and my second horse which is in theory this mare. The overall care is excellent for what I pay, but it's her hobby, not her full time job (my horses are the only high maintenance horses on the farm-and not by my choice). She does what she can-and has been exceptionally helpful with all the extra work I've brought on her (again, not by my choice).

                          This farm is in a low area, and with all the rain we've had is just nasty-nobody's fault, that's just how it is. If other horses on the property were having issues, I wouldn't be upset, at all. The one other one prone to mud fever doesn't have it. And I'm not mad at her-just mad in general. Selling her isn't a punishment, I'd be doing her a favour by getting her into a better living environment. I used to worry about when my horses got hurt or colicked or did something dumb-I certainly don't any more. After a while it gets to be just another day. And it really sucks, other than the excellent veterinary knowledge I'm accumulating at a very rapid pace.

                          Maybe tomorrow will be a better day.
                          "Those who know the least often know it the loudest."

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Find a new boarding situation for her. Not every place suits every horse.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Equine Studies View Post
                              Despite my obviously frustrated thread title, she is not stupid-the weather is stupid, the boarding situation for this mare must be stupid since she's the one out of 13 horses that is affected, and I'm obviously stupid for thinking I might have better luck this time (after 4 years of nothing going right-broken splints and surgery, death due to a freak pasture accident where the mare fell and inpaled herself on a branch and bled out, allergies, another broken splint from a kick in the field, a foal that needed to be pulled then resuscitated because she hadn't turned and was presenting hind legs first, then had to be splinted for badly crooked legs, now 2 years old with OCD chips everywhere). And that's only 3 different horses. I have the black cloud-some people have good luck-I have the exact opposite-the worst that can happen, happens to me and any horse that has the misfortune of having me as an owner. That's just how it is. Anyone who has had a similar slump over four years will understand that the original post was written in complete and utter frustration, anyone who hasn't, will just think I'm the world's biggest jerk. Which is fine, because right now I just don't care.

                              Thought I was being smart buying a mare I know who has had zero issues, and I mean zero, in the 3 years I've known her. Not a lame step, no vet bills, nothing. As soon as I bring her home, here we go. It's unbelievable really. I don't mind dealing with stuff-been there done that. From September to March I got up at 5:00 am, drove to the barn before work and mucked a stall because my two year old kept getting injured in the herd, so had her own turnout in the riding ring in the day time, but no shelter at night so we had to bring her in. Sometimes mucked it twice a day if she couldn't go out at all. I've put in more time, money and effort than anyone I know trying to keep horses sound, healthy and alive, for that matter. But once in a while I'd just like to go to the barn and enjoy my horse(s), hard to do when it seems like every day is just another chore. I'm not that selfish, I don't expect zero maintenance, but I also don't want 100% maintenance, all day, every day. Which has been my horse life for basically the past 4 years.

                              I board at a private barn, owner works full time. No barn staff. Any veterinary care I have to do myself. Even if I could get there twice a day to clean, dry and medicate the legs, there's not much point anyway, they are back in the mud. The barn is super wet as it is on very low land. Spring and fall are going to be a nightmare for this horse.

                              Bottom line is I can't manage this mare where I board if she's always going to be prone to mud fever-there is only outdoor board. Even if I was willing to clean stalls every day again for as long as I own her, she really can't live inside anyway (weaves and cribs even with another horse in with her). In theory this board set up was perfect for her, and she was perfect for me riding wise-it took me 6 months of horse hunting to find her, a lot of convincing on a lot of people's part to make me take a chance on another horse, and a mere 4 days to realize it probably won't work out. I suppose I could just keep her, leave her in the mud with hot, sore, swollen legs, and bond with her every day by picking at them and getting my head kicked in. Sounds like good times.

                              So that hopefully sums up what "stupid new horse has mud fever" really means.
                              Wow, I am absolutely astonished as to how you can fall in love with a mare, who your vet advised you not to buy and then your ready to dump her just because she developed a very treatable condition. I find it sad!

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I tend to agree with Jamie here on food changes, ect. I also have one who is on and off again with mud fever and actually tried a liver tonic this past month. To my surprise, it healed quite well and she is out in mud 24/7 too. This mare is already on a special diet as well.

                                As to the other stuff, well we all have our days.

                                Terri
                                COTH, keeping popcorn growers in business for years.

                                "I need your grace to remind me to find my own." Snow Patrol-Chasing Cars. This line reminds me why I have horses.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Also they do make boots for horses who are always in mud that you can leave on. I'll root around later for the link. I know I've seen them in the UK.

                                  Problem is, it's not always the mud, it's usually the immune system. You mare just moved to a new environment and maybe she needs an immune booster.

                                  Just look at it from different angles instead of blaming the mud. I live in Ireland and only have the one horse with issues whom I bought in a terrible state. I tend not to blame the mud in her case because certain other things are going on with her. Worth looking into.

                                  Terri
                                  COTH, keeping popcorn growers in business for years.

                                  "I need your grace to remind me to find my own." Snow Patrol-Chasing Cars. This line reminds me why I have horses.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by Equine Studies View Post
                                    Some of you may remember the mare with the scary hock x-rays I decided to take a chance on. Her hocks are fine-but she developed mud fever after 4 days of buying her. Yes, it's muddy and gross everywhere, but the other 12 horses don't have it, and she was in equally wet conditions at her old barn. She's not lame-I don't know how-it's hard to tell pastern from cannon she's so swollen. And the forecast is more rain Wed-Sat to add to the cesspool of a farm that hasn't dried yet from the last two weeks of rain.

                                    I can't even begin to explain how absolutely disgusted I am with horses in general right now. It's certainly not her fault, but it's not going to get any drier where I board nor is there anyone there to help manage it so once it's cleared up she'll be back up for sale. Yet another horse with zero issues until I buy it-this one's first vet bill will be after 10 days. What a joke. It just proves once again, that I shouldn't own a horse. Only posting because the moron I live with just reminded me that the vet told me not to buy her-and it's the best distraction I can think of so said moron remains injury free.
                                    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mud_fever

                                    I had to look it up because it's been forever since I've dealt with this stuff and wanted to double check I knew what we speak.

                                    Maybe it's because I'm older and from a dry-humored western ranching family that I 'get' your post. Slightly sarcastic and said with a bent towards mocking yourself, believe me, I get it! So, to me, it's not that big a deal, just differences in what part of the world we are all from.

                                    Just pity it out, don't hold it in, that's what I do. Feel sorry for myself and then when that's old, get on with it and look at it as a challenge, which it sure sounds like you have had *as long as it doesn't take too long*! The only differences I've learned is that when I'm feeling this way, I stick to my private boards where I know I've support and all of us understand each other. But, of course, post wherever you please.

                                    I've had times of nothing going right and then times of everything going right. Try to realize through the gloom, good times will come. If you've done everything you can, that's all you can do. Chin up (I can just HEAR the razzing! ).
                                    1.20.2013

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      op..I have 5 horses here and not a day goes by that something doesn't need treating. As my vet says...it is a miracle they survived as a species.

                                      It sounds like you could use a new boarding situation but I do realize that isn't always possible. Right now we have way more mud than I like to have and thankfully a couple of days of nice weather are coming so some of it might dry up. Even DH's highway grade drainage couldn't keep up with inches of rain day after day.

                                      I hope a good vent here has helped. Sometimes it feels good to let it all out
                                      I Loff My Quarter Horse & I love Fenway Bartholomule cliques

                                      Just somebody with a positive outlook on life...go ahead...hate me for that.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        When I got my 2nd Percheron mare in July, within a few weeks she came down with a nasty hoof abscess that took 5 and a half weeks to clear up. Three weeks of that was soaking, packing, cleaning, wrapping and medicating. Another week after that was packing the hole to ensure nothing got up in there. Then she had issues with the other front hoof so I get one clear and the other starts to go. We get that cleared up and now, a week ago, we got another abscess in the hind hoof!! But, while I did shed some tears and sit in the barn while her hoof was soaking in complete frustration, I would never think of selling her. I did however color the air with some very colorful words!!

                                        Can you not put the mare in at night in a clean, dry stall to give her a chance to dry out? Good luck and chin up, don't give up on the mare just yet, they ARE worth it as I got 9 weeks of soundness out of my mare and we had a hell of a few good shows that we walked away grinning!!

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