• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Whole food/organic diet for horses-any one have "recipes" they use

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Whole food/organic diet for horses-any one have "recipes" they use

    Really interested in getting my horses off commercial feed. Any one here doing that?? Would love to hear what you are feeding.

    I am lucky that my guys stay out 24/7 on good grass so don't need much grain to begin with and also have great hay local as well.

    Thanks for your ideas!

  • #2
    Base 'natural vegetable/fruit/nut/seed' diet: (leave skin, seeds, etc. all on veggie - just chop up and feed 1X daily)

    1 - 2 yams
    3-4 carrots
    1 apple
    1 orange
    1/2 - 1 avocado (no pit)
    1 radish
    handful of fresh sprouts
    big handful of fresh spring mix greens
    1/4 - 1 cup flax
    1 cup Black Oil Sunflower Seed
    1 tbsp kelp
    1/4 cup Safflower infused with clove of garlic and sprig of rosemary

    to this, if you want, you can add other veggies and fruits that you might have around i.e. any squash, melons, trail mix (w/o the chocolate - just add small handful), raw pumpkin seeds, pumpkin skin, seeds and all, beans, peas, green leafy veggies, broccoli, swiss chard, dandelion, beet greens, ... etc.

    NO tomatoes, NO potatoes, NO eggplant.

    Feed this just 1X daily whenever you feel like it. It makes about 1/3rd - 1/2 a 20 qt. bucket.

    Mixing up a salad and adding it to regular rations (just a handful or two of salad) will benefit as well if one doesn't feel comfortable giving up all grain.
    --Gwen <><
    "Treat others as you want to be treated and be the change you want to see in the world."
    http://www.thepenzancehorse.com

    Comment


    • #3
      Whole food is easy. Organic is a little trickier.

      Try searching the Horse Care forum for "soy free diet" or "grain free diet". A lot of COTH'ers have gone to this kind of plan for various reasons. Most of them are using ingredients such as beet pulp, oats, rice bran, alfalfa pellets, and powdered vit/min supplements to get the balance right.
      Head Geek at The Saddle Geek Blog http://www.thesaddlegeek.com/

      Comment


      • #4
        You do realize that regular commercial horse feeds are basically all organic. It's not like the major brands such as Purina use a lot of ingredients other then beet pulp, oats, corn etc. The stuff they tend to add is the vitamins and minerals that you's have to add if you made up your own "organic" diet anyway because otherwise it would not be balanced with these items as grains and grasses lose their vitamin content over time once they are dried. Please be sure to contact a nutritionist, before embarking on a significant diet change to make sure that your horses diet is balanced and they do not develop any deficiencies over time.

        Comment


        • #5
          OP you have a PM

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by HD2008 View Post
            You do realize that regular commercial horse feeds are basically all organic.
            Organic possibly but unlikely. If these horse feeds were buying organic produce, our horse feed would be hella expensive and people would be buying it to feed themselves.

            Any of the pelleted/extruded feeds are, by definition, not whole foods. Whole food means unprocessed, unrefined, or refined as little as possible. Under that definition, even beet pulp is iffy. The texturized commercial feeds might arguably be whole foods if they're just mixes of natural whole ingredients (oats, corn, etc.)

            For the record, I am not an advocate of organic/whole foods for horses. My horse eats a low-starch commercial pellet and I'm very happy with his diet. But the OP didn't ask what I THOUGHT of feeding a horse organically, just how to do it.
            Head Geek at The Saddle Geek Blog http://www.thesaddlegeek.com/

            Comment


            • #7
              3 parts beet pulp
              2 parts alfalfa cubes
              1 part oats
              1 part barley, flaked or boiled (If you're not using boiled barley, you can mix this all up in a big container with a clean shovel)
              add:
              1 cup flax seed
              2 ounces hemp seed oil

              Soak all of the above together. The flax needs at least half an hour so it can get all gooey and easy to digest. Hot water helps, I'd give it longer if you're using cold water

              Supplements of choice, I have had good luck with theracell and platinum performance.
              -Grace

              Comment


              • #8
                Soaked alfalfa cubes, SmartVite, and rice bran for the ones who need a bit more calories. Out 24/7 on pasture, and local grass hay 4 or 5 times a day in the winter. It's very easy, everyone is in excellent weight with a shiney coat.

                If you don't want to soak the alfalfa cubes, you could use pellets.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hay. Oats. Flaxseed. Salt/minerals. Water.

                  Getting all that in "organic" form is a little more challenging--the definition is not consistent, not terribly helpful, and probably not all that relevant to a horse anyway.
                  Click here before you buy.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by SCFHan View Post
                    Really interested in getting my horses off commercial feed. Any one here doing that?? Would love to hear what you are feeding.

                    I am lucky that my guys stay out 24/7 on good grass so don't need much grain to begin with and also have great hay local as well.

                    Thanks for your ideas!
                    I don't understand the question. If they horses are out 24/7 on good grass/hay and holding condition and fitness why are you feeding any suppliments at all?

                    If they are not holding condition/fitness on grass/alone what are you looking for?

                    G.
                    Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by HD2008 View Post
                      You do realize that regular commercial horse feeds are basically all organic. It's not like the major brands such as Purina use a lot of ingredients other then beet pulp, oats, corn etc.
                      What's your definition of "organic"? There's no way Purina uses much, if any ingredients that are truly organic. Organic is $$, and Purina isn't (relatively speaking). I *highly* doubt their bp and grains are organic. Highly. If they were using organic products, especially those items which can make up a large part of a commercial feed, it would be blasted all over their labels.
                      ______________________________
                      The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        me neither. Good grass, a salt block, free choice minerals, fresh water. That's about as plain and organic as it reasonably gets.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Pasture, water, salt.

                          Why project human perceptions/sensibilities onto creatures as basically self-sufficient as horses?

                          What do you plan to do for parasite control?

                          "Organic" ivermectin?
                          Inner Bay Equestrian
                          Facebook
                          KERx

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Organic means that the product is grown without synthetic fertilizers. Organic products have more vitamins and minerals because using synthetic fertilizers depletes the soil of nutrients by locking them up. Most all of our corn grown in the US is now genetically modified as is the case with most of the soy. There has been no studies on the long term use of GMO foods for humans or animals yet our government looks the other way while Monsanto and other big Ag companies add more and more GMO seeds into our food sources. Look at the type of fat that is added to your commercial feed. It is mostly soy. Some information points to soy not being so good for horses especially mares because of the affect on their hormones. Sources of protein are not fully disclosed. Could it be feathers and chicken skin? Remember our horses are herbivores, these types of protein could not be good for them.

                            In the wild, horses forage for different kinds of foods not just grasses. They will find berries, nuts, fruits and seeds. Not to mention just chewing on a tree limb. I found my pony in my rose garden one day eating rose hips. They are high in copper and vitamin C among others. Whole foods provide many things that have not even been discovered in fruits and veggies etc. Perhaps there is something in a whole orange that helps us absorb the vitamin C that a glass of orange juice just doesn't have.

                            I try to give my horses a variety of foods. I change it up every day. I could be wrong but a "bag" of feed looks very much like fast food to me.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by sunnygirl View Post
                              Organic means that the product is grown without synthetic fertilizers. Organic products have more vitamins and minerals because using synthetic fertilizers depletes the soil of nutrients by locking them up. Most all of our corn grown in the US is now genetically modified as is the case with most of the soy. There has been no studies on the long term use of GMO foods for humans or animals yet our government looks the other way while Monsanto and other big Ag companies add more and more GMO seeds into our food sources. Look at the type of fat that is added to your commercial feed. It is mostly soy. Some information points to soy not being so good for horses especially mares because of the affect on their hormones. Sources of protein are not fully disclosed. Could it be feathers and chicken skin? Remember our horses are herbivores, these types of protein could not be good for them.

                              In the wild, horses forage for different kinds of foods not just grasses. They will find berries, nuts, fruits and seeds. Not to mention just chewing on a tree limb. I found my pony in my rose garden one day eating rose hips. They are high in copper and vitamin C among others. Whole foods provide many things that have not even been discovered in fruits and veggies etc. Perhaps there is something in a whole orange that helps us absorb the vitamin C that a glass of orange juice just doesn't have.

                              I try to give my horses a variety of foods. I change it up every day. I could be wrong but a "bag" of feed looks very much like fast food to me.
                              Two thumbs up on this reply!
                              --Gwen <><
                              "Treat others as you want to be treated and be the change you want to see in the world."
                              http://www.thepenzancehorse.com

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Genesis Feeds (based in Canada) makes a line of organic feeds that I have fed to my very allergic horse for a couple of years now with great success. There are local dealers in the US so look on the Genesis site if you want to try it. My horse was horribly picky with all sorts of feeds that I had tried him on (I'm sure he just felt bad all the time) but he loves the Genesis and is in great weight and condition.

                                http://www.organic-horse-feed.com/

                                http://www.dailydoseequine.com/feeds...anicfeeds.html

                                The second link is where I buy mine. That's me with Bentley on the Genesis page.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  gwen-does the processing of alfalfa pellets/cubes (or any hay pellet/cube) 'concern' you? Less so than other processed feeds?

                                  Also did you find a difference from adding fruits/nut/etc vs just feeding a mixed forage diet?

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Good Morning Leah -- hope your Thanksgiving was a nice day for you. And I send that wish to all.

                                    Each vegetable, fruit, nut, seed has its own vit/min properties and the varied forages help to supply the essentials for the health maintaince or healing of the body. One of the major additions feeding vine-ripened forages is that they contain *essential* glyconutrients for overall health; particularly cell health.

                                    In direct answer to your direct question -- a couple of winters ago I was unable to constantly and personally care for all my critters (health issues) so had to simplify for those helping me. I omitted the fresh foods and they were fed *** only *** concentrated Senior feed, "complete" feed and whatever hay was easiest and least expensive to obtain (mostly 1st cut). Every other spring I had to put the critters on diets cause they actually gained too many pounds over the wintertime. But that spring saw ribs, dull eyes, rough coats that shed out in clumps and bunches instead of magically morphing to shiny and sleek with minimal currying. I encountered laminitis for the first time in years in my herd. Misty had gone downhill terrifyingly; Dorian looked like a grey ghost; ponies didn't fully shed their coats until late June while looking motheaten most of the time. I was just horrified, scared and feeling so guilty that I had not taken better care of them over the harsh winter months.

                                    This was the summer when I desperately sought out 'miracles' for Misty, in particular (I'm sure many of you remember the LSJ heralding in my posts! http://www.thepenzancehorse.com/2009...S/misty09.html) and 'miracles' I found and that set me off on a nutrition obsession that hasn't stopped yet. (I just do not endorse LSJ any longer.)

                                    Suffice to say I will NEVER feed a diet of *all* processed feeds again -- to my critters or will I eat them. If needed to add extra calories for the seniors or health challenged then I consider processed, bagged foods (and that includes beet pulp, low-carb 'grains', etc.) merely as 'supplements' to the fresh forages that I can get. (I, personally, will only feed forage extender or hay cubes; nothing else.) Hay has always been THE major base for equine diets for me but as long as I can feed fresh produce then I don't worry so much about whether its 1st cut or 2nd cut hay. (2nd cut T/A/C being my strong preference.)

                                    I realize not everyone is in a position to feed nothing but hay, grass and fresh vegetables/fruits/nuts/seeds etc. but even the addition of a 'salad' once or twice a week will get *some* of the necessary forages into the diet. That's what I *used* to do before LSJ -- I'd feed 'salads' as 'supplements' rather than as 'meals' -- once or twice a week. And God forbid they get any grass!! No, no, no! -- I believed and was drawn in to the 'buy the low carb/no sugar' processed feeds and keep them OFF grass as if it were poisoned. Now? I'm seeding and praying that we can add another acres of grazing grass next spring! Horses NEED GRASS -- they're created to eat grass BUT -- they're also created to eat a whole bunch of other f.r.e.s.h. forages! trees, barks, leaves, shrubs, weeds, flowers etc. etc. That's what equine EAT! Reading results of studies done on processed foods floored me. (brief conclusion of many, many nights of reading is here: http://horseconsult.wordpress.com "Connect the Dots"

                                    Well, suffice to say you helped me up on my soapbox again. Thanks -- I'll step down now.

                                    Short answer -- YES. The addition of fruits, nuts, seeds make a TREMENDOUS difference in terms of overall health and well-being. They all have something of their own to add in terms of vit and mins. And YES ... any processed food concerns me when fed as a singular diet. Big time!
                                    --Gwen <><
                                    "Treat others as you want to be treated and be the change you want to see in the world."
                                    http://www.thepenzancehorse.com

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      thanks gwen-please check you pm box---

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by caballus View Post
                                        I omitted the fresh foods and they were fed *** only *** concentrated Senior feed, "complete" feed and whatever hay was easiest and least expensive to obtain (mostly 1st cut). Every other spring I had to put the critters on diets cause they actually gained too many pounds over the wintertime. But that spring saw ribs, dull eyes, rough coats that shed out in clumps and bunches instead of magically morphing to shiny and sleek with minimal currying. I encountered laminitis for the first time in years in my herd.
                                        One must be careful not to blame the lack of fresh whole foods on this, when you went to a poorer quality hay and higher sugar fortified feed.


                                        but even the addition of a 'salad' once or twice a week will get *some* of the necessary forages into the diet.
                                        But adequate hay/grass IS necessary forage. The "salad" is not providing long-stem fiber which is the necessary forage type for horses. Not to say it's not beneficial, but they are not the "necessary forages" - hay and grass are


                                        And YES ... any processed food concerns me when fed as a singular diet. Big time!
                                        Do you mean the concentrated portion of the diet? I'm still not sure I understand your definition of "processed"
                                        ______________________________
                                        The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X