Sport Horse Spotlight

Vitalis_img_4461skawx LL_Fotos

Real Estate Spotlight

UMS_01

Sale Spotlight

COTH_without Subscribe
  • Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You�re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the Forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it�details of personal disputes may be better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts, though are not legally obligated to do so, regardless of content.

Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting. Moderators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts unless they have been alerted and have determined that a post, thread or user has violated the Forums� policies. Moderators do not regularly independently monitor the Forums for such violations.

Profanity, outright vulgarity, blatant personal insults or otherwise inappropriate statements will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

Users may provide their positive or negative experiences with or opinions of companies, products, individuals, etc.; however, accounts involving allegations of criminal behavior against named individuals or companies MUST be first-hand accounts and may NOT be made anonymously.

If a situation has been reported upon by a reputable news source or addressed by law enforcement or the legal system it is open for discussion, but if an individual wants to make their own claims of criminal behavior against a named party in the course of that discussion, they too must identify themselves by first and last name and the account must be first-person.

Criminal allegations that do not satisfy these requirements, when brought to our attention, may be removed pending satisfaction of these criteria, and we reserve the right to err on the side of caution when making these determinations.

Credible threats of suicide will be reported to the police along with identifying user information at our disposal, in addition to referring the user to suicide helpline resources such as 1-800-SUICIDE or 1-800-273-TALK.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it�s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users� profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses � Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it�s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who�s selling it, it doesn�t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions � Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services � Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products � While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements � Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be �bumped� excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues � Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators� discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the �alert� button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your �Ignore� list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you�d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user�s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 5/9/18)
See more
See less

I think wild pigs have done my horse in, any thoughts

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • I think wild pigs have done my horse in, any thoughts

    I'm looking for a little advice here, because I think my horse has lost it. If no advice, then a little commiseration.

    Briefly, this is a 10 year old TB eventer who I've owned about 2 years. He has never been the easiest guy under tack, and I knew his whole history--which included a lot of homes and a lot of washed out careers, when I bought him. But I love him and we've gotten on well, and had a fair bit of competitive success. We moved to a new farm in June.

    (I should add before it gets brought up--In the past 2 weeks he's been gone over by the vet with a fine toothed comb, been adjusted/massaged/bodyworked, has the fit of his saddles checked professionally, and he had his teeth floated in October. Nothing in his feeding, turnout, etc. routine has changed in the last six months.)

    Starting about two weeks ago, the horse has become almost unridable, hell almost unhandlable. And as goofy as it sounds, I think it's because of wild pigs. We have them (not cute little Poomba-from-the-lion-king-pigs, but huge (think 5 feet tall or more at the shoulder) hairy, tusked, beasts from hell. )

    He is on edge 100% of the time. He doesn't want to go out to his field, he doesn't want to come in. He doesn't want to hack (usually his favortie and best thing) when he's being ridden in the ring any movement outside the ring causes violent wheeling and snorting. Even in the stall he is on full red alert--bite of food, wheels to stare out the window, bite of food, wheels to stare out the window. About the same time, I noticed signs, and then saw, that the wild pigs have been wandering on to our property near his field.

    I'm a rider who specializes in the horses needing a sympathetic ride, and I'm not someone who has ever been interested in having rides be fights. However, I am rapidly getting there with this guy. And the thing is if I make it a fight, I can win--yesterday after 15 minutes of booting, wheeling, and little cowboyin' I got him to do exactly what I wanted. BUT, I can feel that he is tense and terrified--he never relaxed, he just . . . obeyed. And frankly, that doesn't interest me at all. I'd rather turn him out than have every ride be a fight, or have him tense as a drum--walk is short and tight, eyes rolling. Can feel his heart pounding etc. etc. He's always been spooky, but he just feels as though he expects the boogey man to leap out at him any second, or perhaps I should say every second. He is normally the best hack in the barn, and day before yesterday it took everything I had to get him down his favortie trail. The one that he normally pricks up his ears and happily goes down on the buckle.

    Like I said, he's always been a bit on the tricky side, but I have NEVER had anything like the issues I'm having now with him. And it's breaking my heart. I was literally in tears yesterday wondering what has happened to my wonderful horse and why is he so afraid?

    Could it be that the pigs have just sent him over the edge? And If so, what do I do about it? My vet actually suggested that I ace him for a few rides to try to "break the cycle of terror" (as in, if he has several rides where he doesn't get eaten by the pigs he might realize he is safe) but I don't love that idea. But if it would work, I'm all for it.

    Am I insane? (Wait, I know the answer to that, since I haven't slept in a week obsessing about this horse . . .) Is there hope?

    I should add that I have 14 other horses on the property, many of whom I am paid to train, who have snorted at the "pig sign" and even shuffled past it nervously, or tried not to go past it, but then given in and been fine. In other words, they've reacted, but not lost their mind to the extent of this guy.
    Phoenix Farm ~ Breeding-Training-Sales
    Eventing, Dressage, Young Horses
    www.phoenixsporthorses.com
    Check out my new blog: http://califcountrymom.blogspot.com

  • #2
    is this your property? could you fence his pasture/paddock in such a way to make if difficult for the hogs to get in? (be cautious with the Ace - risk of penile paralysis)
    Nothing says "I love you" like a tractor. (Clydejumper)

    The reports states, Elizabeth reported that she accidently put down this pony, ........, at the show.

    Comment


    • #3
      Get a donkey to do pig patrol in the pasture, and hack out with a steady eddie pal for a while so he can get over the fear.

      Comment


      • #4
        Couple of thoughts....
        yes, pigs can send him over the edge. Back in the days of the dinosaurs I used to do the western arena 'trail' classes. I don't know what they are called now. One of the 'obstacles' that was reserved for the advanced competitions or for a tie breaker was to have to simply walk your horse passed a pen of pigs, or worse, between two pens.
        An astounding number of horses would not walk past the pigs, they made it clear that they would rather be shot.
        So I think there is an instinctive reaction to pigs.

        Second, pigs are dangerous. For those of you who have never seen one run down a small animal or a chicken or goose and kill it and eat it, this may come as a shock. Domestic pigs are the most dangerous farm animal there is and wild pigs are considered big game with all the thrills and chills that implies. The wild pigs in Texas and NM are not to be messed with and I assume if you have wild pigs they are just as much a threat.

        If your horse has been chased by pigs he may never get over it, if he is ever injured by one you will have a real problem. But if they are just in the area he can get used to them, just like any other spooky thing. It is just a matter of time and conditioning. I don't know if there is any fencing that will keep them out, but it might be worth looking into to give him a safe zone, where he can figure out that THEY are over there and not anything to worry about.
        Nina's Story
        Epona Comm on FB

        Comment

        • Original Poster

          #5
          Thanks for the thoughts. It is my property, but I'm not sure I can do more that I already am in terms of trying to fence the things out (spoke to my neighbors who told me flat out that isn't a fence built they can't go through if they want). Between my horses and the outside the pigs have to travers barbed wire, non-climb, AND electric. And it's not stopping them.

          I don't drug a horse willy nilly, and I was aware of that potential danger with ace. I'd rather not go there, as I said.

          I actually already have a pair of donkeys (as flock guardians for my nigerian goats) and they want nothing to do with the pigs either. He is turned out with a steady eddy who tends to stare at his hysterics with that pricelss expression of "what is HIS problem?" He is no calmer in the company of another.

          Thanks.
          Phoenix Farm ~ Breeding-Training-Sales
          Eventing, Dressage, Young Horses
          www.phoenixsporthorses.com
          Check out my new blog: http://califcountrymom.blogspot.com

          Comment


          • #6
            Donks most likely wouldn't stand a chance against a wild boar. While a donk usually works well for canids...not much scares off a wild pig other than a wild grizzly.
            I'd suggest trying to scent your property perimeter, but then predator scent isn't likely to calm your horse down since he's prey.
            You may have to resort to big game hunters, boars are nothing to mess with.
            Do you have figs, acorns, veggie gardens around? Anything planted that has bulbs near the farm? Wild mushrooms, lichen or wild berries? Those are all board magnets. Maybe try checking for piggy edibles and trying to remove whatever seems to be luring them in close?
            You jump in the saddle,
            Hold onto the bridle!
            Jump in the line!
            ...Belefonte

            Comment


            • #7
              For those who've never run into a wild pig...this is what the OP's horse is afraid of...
              http://www.wildboar.freeservers.com/...rry40102_3.jpg
              http://www.maineoutdoorstoday.com/photot46.jpg
              You jump in the saddle,
              Hold onto the bridle!
              Jump in the line!
              ...Belefonte

              Comment

              • Original Poster

                #8
                Thanks Barb. These things are TERRIFYING and yes, I've known they were very dangerous. I grew up in this area, and it wasn't uncommon for thee pigs to kill the occaisional hunter. I should add they aren't, from what I can see getting IN his turnout, but they are next to it.

                I guess I'll just have to keep trying to show him he's OK.
                Phoenix Farm ~ Breeding-Training-Sales
                Eventing, Dressage, Young Horses
                www.phoenixsporthorses.com
                Check out my new blog: http://califcountrymom.blogspot.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  I do believe that pigs could be a big part of his problem. I rode a horse for a friends of mine at a nice place in PA. One of the neighboring farms had lost a sheep and the darn thing kept showing up in odd places completely unannounced and then would sneak up and "BAAAA". Well, my friend's OTTB thought that sheep was the devil. He lost him mind over it. After they caught the sheep, it took months for him to stop looking for it.

                  Edited: OMGIH!!!!! I saw the pig picture. Yes, he absolutely could be terrified of that thing. I would be.
                  Last edited by Just My Style; Jan. 29, 2007, 04:47 PM. Reason: Saw the pig photo!

                  Comment

                  • Original Poster

                    #10
                    Yep, misty, that's the critter. Lovely, huh.

                    I will hike out today and see if I can eliminate foodstuffs. But I have 60 acres, surrounded by several hundred of other open and partially farmed land. I think they are coming in for the acorns of the roughly 50-60 oak trees. So it's not going to be something easily eliminated.

                    I might look into the predator scent thing--he's come across bears, coyote and even a mountain lion while hacking and barely reacted. So that shouldn't be nearly as disturbing to him as these pigs seem to be.
                    Phoenix Farm ~ Breeding-Training-Sales
                    Eventing, Dressage, Young Horses
                    www.phoenixsporthorses.com
                    Check out my new blog: http://califcountrymom.blogspot.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      We used to have pigs on the property (the domestic kind). If one got loose and ran out into the pasture, the entire herd would go bananas. Some would run, others (usually the TBs or appendix TBs) would rush in and try to kill it. Pigs provoke anything but a lukewarm response. I would suggest going to an ag site specifically about pig husbandry, or one concerning exotic zoologicals (African Wild Boor) and finding out what bugs them and then lay it down along the fence line. If you don't want to ride the horse under the influence of an herbal quieting remedy, then you might consider doing a little training out of reach of the pigs, and then progressively working him closer to them. I have found that some TBs and other breeds need to be worked closer and closer to a scary situation, and not brought directly up against it for a while, as you can do with some of the stock breeds. You have a problem here, and I wish you luck.
                      "The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits." Albert Einstein

                      http://s1098.photobucket.com/albums/...2011%20Photos/

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Wild boars have always been a natural enemy of horses. I would say the fear is ingrained in the horse. Your poor boy!!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by MistyBlue View Post
                          For those who've never run into a wild pig...this is what the OP's horse is afraid of...
                          http://www.wildboar.freeservers.com/...rry40102_3.jpg
                          http://www.maineoutdoorstoday.com/photot46.jpg
                          \oh my oh my

                          if I had those roaming near my place -- first I'd add a perimeter (where the other beasts could not touch) of super-charged electric, set at 2-3 feet high to discourage the buggers from coming near the barn - - second, I'd be heavily armed when out where they might be (assuming that they would prefer to leave upon my approach but wanting to be prepared if charged)
                          Nothing says "I love you" like a tractor. (Clydejumper)

                          The reports states, Elizabeth reported that she accidently put down this pony, ........, at the show.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by MistyBlue View Post
                            For those who've never run into a wild pig...this is what the OP's horse is afraid of...
                            http://www.wildboar.freeservers.com/...rry40102_3.jpg
                            http://www.maineoutdoorstoday.com/photot46.jpg
                            Oh my gosh!
                            I have never seen anything like that in my life, or never even would have thought something like that existed!
                            I'm terrified just looking at the pics. I can only imagine the horse.

                            I have no insite, but definate good luck with your horse. Not fun to have a negative behavioral change suddenly.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Phoenix...I'd suggest a big game hunter to clear them out. Be careful walking your property lines...pigs usually leave if humans come around but if you accidentally startle or surprise them then you could be in a world of trouble. And these buggers are *fast.*
                              I do wildlife rehab on predators...and I'm much happier working with things that eat other living things and living in a state without giant wild pigs. Few things wandering around this country would make me mess my drawers...but a wild boar is definitely on my list of "need new undies."
                              2 years ago I was invited on a wild boar hunt...I turned it down cold. This was a hunt from horseback and my only thought was "it had better be pegasus or I ain't going."
                              Canine scents (wolves) may deter smaller sows with young, but frankly boars have no fear of a wolf. Or black bear. Grizzlies and pumas eat boars though if you want to try to lay out musk.
                              (there's a reason you see hunters posing with boars carrying large bore rifles with scopes)
                              You jump in the saddle,
                              Hold onto the bridle!
                              Jump in the line!
                              ...Belefonte

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                After seeing the pics and reading this thread, I google searched wild pigs, and actually got a newspaper article about a pig who chased a woman and her horse.


                                http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/liv...n_page_id=1770

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  We had a mountain lion chase our horses thru a gate once and one of the horses, a really cute five year old AQHA palomino, would never again leave the pens to go out, even if the others went out to graze unconcerned.
                                  He was not happy at all here and kept losing weight.
                                  That was a bombproof horse, that used to "help" me pull post on an old fence by jingling the chain and post hanging from the tractor bucket.
                                  We tried to take him to a friend for a few weeks and when he came back here, the same, so we finally sold him to a neighbor to our friend, and he is still there today, very happy.

                                  Sometimes, it is not worth to have the horse live like that, if, as you say, he won't even settle in the stall.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Forgive me if this has already been mentioned but I would tranquilize this horse so that his adreneline can come down. Living in this state is not healthy. Sorry I know that is no cure for your problem but it's a bandaid for his nerves right now. Poor baby.
                                    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
                                    ---
                                    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by PhoenixFarm View Post
                                      I'm looking for a little advice here, because I think my horse has lost it. If no advice, then a little commiseration.

                                      Briefly, this is a 10 year old TB eventer who I've owned about 2 years. He has never been the easiest guy under tack, and I knew his whole history--which included a lot of homes and a lot of washed out careers, when I bought him. But I love him and we've gotten on well, and had a fair bit of competitive success. We moved to a new farm in June.

                                      (I should add before it gets brought up--In the past 2 weeks he's been gone over by the vet with a fine toothed comb, been adjusted/massaged/bodyworked, has the fit of his saddles checked professionally, and he had his teeth floated in October. Nothing in his feeding, turnout, etc. routine has changed in the last six months.)

                                      Starting about two weeks ago, the horse has become almost unridable, hell almost unhandlable. And as goofy as it sounds, I think it's because of wild pigs. We have them (not cute little Poomba-from-the-lion-king-pigs, but huge (think 5 feet tall or more at the shoulder) hairy, tusked, beasts from hell. )

                                      He is on edge 100% of the time. He doesn't want to go out to his field, he doesn't want to come in. He doesn't want to hack (usually his favortie and best thing) when he's being ridden in the ring any movement outside the ring causes violent wheeling and snorting. Even in the stall he is on full red alert--bite of food, wheels to stare out the window, bite of food, wheels to stare out the window. About the same time, I noticed signs, and then saw, that the wild pigs have been wandering on to our property near his field.

                                      I'm a rider who specializes in the horses needing a sympathetic ride, and I'm not someone who has ever been interested in having rides be fights. However, I am rapidly getting there with this guy. And the thing is if I make it a fight, I can win--yesterday after 15 minutes of booting, wheeling, and little cowboyin' I got him to do exactly what I wanted. BUT, I can feel that he is tense and terrified--he never relaxed, he just . . . obeyed. And frankly, that doesn't interest me at all. I'd rather turn him out than have every ride be a fight, or have him tense as a drum--walk is short and tight, eyes rolling. Can feel his heart pounding etc. etc. He's always been spooky, but he just feels as though he expects the boogey man to leap out at him any second, or perhaps I should say every second. He is normally the best hack in the barn, and day before yesterday it took everything I had to get him down his favortie trail. The one that he normally pricks up his ears and happily goes down on the buckle.

                                      Like I said, he's always been a bit on the tricky side, but I have NEVER had anything like the issues I'm having now with him. And it's breaking my heart. I was literally in tears yesterday wondering what has happened to my wonderful horse and why is he so afraid?

                                      Could it be that the pigs have just sent him over the edge? And If so, what do I do about it? My vet actually suggested that I ace him for a few rides to try to "break the cycle of terror" (as in, if he has several rides where he doesn't get eaten by the pigs he might realize he is safe) but I don't love that idea. But if it would work, I'm all for it.

                                      Am I insane? (Wait, I know the answer to that, since I haven't slept in a week obsessing about this horse . . .) Is there hope?

                                      I should add that I have 14 other horses on the property, many of whom I am paid to train, who have snorted at the "pig sign" and even shuffled past it nervously, or tried not to go past it, but then given in and been fine. In other words, they've reacted, but not lost their mind to the extent of this guy.

                                      Yes, it could be. My well behaved Racking horse lost his mind over pigs-not even scary pigs like yours,over sized pot bellied pigs. They got the same reaction your guy is giving you. Climb the walls, sweat snort, freak out. Yep-these are civilized horses and pigs do not fly with them. Of course, Renegade does not like chickens either, but not to the extreme that he HATES PIGS.

                                      Pigs and bears are genetically related. Bears eat horses. Pigs therefore eat horses. As to what to do, I have nary a clue. We moved because the land was sold to Ga Power, but my hubby was going to go hunting some piggies if we had been able to stay.

                                      All non sense aside, wild hogs are dangerous. They will attack, they will give chase, and they will eat meat. They are also hard to kill, even with a bullet. Don't mess with them. Call DNR and let them know that you have a problem, and have them deal with it ASAP unless you have a friend who is good with a hog killing gun, and even then SSS.
                                      http://community.webshots.com/album/548368465RfewoU[/url]

                                      She may not have changed the stars from their courses, but she loved a good man, and she rode good horses.author unknown

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        When I was foxhunting here in Texas, we would come across them often. And they have a peculiar smell about them. Musky. You can always tell where a pig had been. I can only imagine what my horse thought of it. But ALL the horses would get quite upset when we came across the trail that had that scent.

                                        We would always pile in 3 abreast when we came onto a pig. It was quite frightening. One time the hounds ran riot and went after the pig and all I can tell you is it was the most frightening thing I had ever witnessed... EVER... We all just stood in the woods quiet and waiting while the whips tried to bring the hounds back. I was only glad that the hounds ran away from the field instead of towards. That was my greatest fear. I kept thinking... "Don't fall off, don't fall off. Grab mane and go!"

                                        All the hounds came back on that day. Don't think the pig faired well, but it was a large pack with 15 couples. The odds were in their favor on that day...

                                        I don't blame your horse for being scared. I do know that they sell predator urine online and we have used that on more than one ocassion. Perhaps give that a try and do a drag around your perimeter.

                                        Be careful when you are afoot! They are nasty!
                                        "Shoot low Sheriff! She rides a fast pony!"

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X