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Another gas colic

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  • Another gas colic

    Looking for some advice or comments from anyone that has a horse that tends to have gas colics. This is the 2nd one for 2009, but he seems to have at least 2/year.
    background:
    7 yo unraced tb, basically a pasture pet because I dont have time to ride him. He is in good weight, easy keeper, cribs (even w/strap on) not neurotically(just annoyingly), on good pasture 8 - 12 hrs/day depending upon fly season, all you can eat timothy mix, 1/4 quart of a 12% pellet twice a day, no supplements and has a huge stall w/in&out access to small paddock whenever he is in. I have treated him for ulcers (without scoping) but no change.
    He's got a pretty cushy life, in my opinion.
    Cant pinpoint any reason for the gas colics. Is there any corelation to the cribbing? He was very painful yesterday but it resolved after some dyperone and ace and light lunging and 1.5 hrs of handwalking. He was pooping big piles through the entire process.

    Thanks for any advice that you could give me. FYI, Im on limited funds so scoping for ulcers is not an option.
    http://www.chronicleofmyhorse.com/profile/Jen75

  • #2
    I posted on a similar thread but we've had a great deal of luck w/ Equishure and preventing gas colic symptons. There very well could be an underlying issue in your case that needs examined but also from hindgut acidosis.

    Thehorse.com had a pretty good article on this back in the fall regarding ulcers and colonic issues where it was discussed as some of the causes being from overconsumption of either high-starch concentrates or pasture grasses rich in fructans.
    Equishure

    Comment


    • #3
      We did have a cribber who occasionally got gas colic; every time he'd head for the pepper trees & munch on leaves until the vet got here. Since we gave him to a new home to retire he's stayed about the same & was 32 this year. On the other hand there's a cribber here who worse than tho other one ever was and he's never colicked in the 5 or 6 years he's been here. Neither are on pasture or lots of grain. The Equishure looks interesting, though neither show any of the symptoms of acidosis.
      suze
      http://www.cafepress.com/horses_by_hawk

      Comment


      • #4
        Hummm interesting...

        My pasture puff is a cribber, 18 years old and only cribs after his grain feedings, even with the strap on. But he's NEVER colicked, ever, while two other non-cribbing geldings about the same age got gas colic at least once, a year apart, in spring and summer. All three get the same turn out, hay ammount, senior feed, supplements (more or less).

        I'm pretty sure the aged cribber has ulcers, but like you, I can't justify the expense to have him scoped. He's happy and healthy, so I'm not worried.

        Can't figure the cause of the other colics. Luckily I had Banamine on hand, paste dosed them at the 1200 lbs mark. Within 10 minutes they pooped and were fine. It hasn't happened again..... I dunno, the two cases were too random and artibrary to pin point the cause. Keeping figers crossed!

        Comment


        • #5
          A reasonable inexpensive thing to try is put him on probios 2x's a day. I had 2 school horses that would gas colic every time we would be getting a storm the probios stopped the colic in both guys! Took about a month of feeding .

          Comment


          • #6
            Pro bios seem to help some chronic gas colics. My late mare had quite a few gas colics. I could usually tell what set them off though. (she wasn't a cribber) One was after my neighbors moved in...shared driveway and the moving truck couldn't get down it so men were shlepping furniture up and down the driveway for hours. My mare felt a need to watch and pace since they were Strange Intruders and by that night had a gas colic. Hers were almost always nerve or weather change problems. I never found anything that helped prevent them, pro bios didn't work for her. But I did find ways to alleviate them faster. Banamine was always given, then depending on the level of the colic either belly lifts/hard massage or some tor on the longe line seemed to move those gas bubbles better and faster. Another huge help was the mint flavored Maalox chewables. Thankfully she was a mint fiend...so ate them right out of my hand and then would fart up a storm in no time. But you can also crush them, mix with some water and oral syringe them...or just buy the Maalox liquid (easier than crushing tablets) and syringe that.
            They're scary sometimes, aren't they?
            You jump in the saddle,
            Hold onto the bridle!
            Jump in the line!
            ...Belefonte

            Comment


            • #7
              We actually started using Equishure on a show mare that does not have turn out access and is fed a concentrate feed, rice bran and free choice hay but had a tendency to be on the nervous side at shows and had gas issues including colic like symptoms and often loose stool. From my stand point as a preventative stand point it the higher acid levels can occur for a number of reasons just like higher acid levels in the stomach that lead to ulcers, for example stress.

              An interesting side note is that we were discussing our dentist's horse that would not gain weight w/ him this spring and he had tried probiotics, supplementing fat and obviously the teeth were in good order. He tried Equishure and now the horse is over the weight gain issue. It does make sense since most of the digestion is in the hind gut through fermentation why it would help.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by nextyear View Post
                A reasonable inexpensive thing to try is put him on probios 2x's a day. I had 2 school horses that would gas colic every time we would be getting a storm the probios stopped the colic in both guys! Took about a month of feeding .
                My mare gas coliced badly last week. After a banamine injection and tubing she was fine, I was more of the wreck by then

                She is a hardcore cribber and also gets probios daily, and while I think the probios help, I don't think it is an absolute cure all. Oh how I wish there was one for colic!

                Comment

                • Original Poster

                  #9
                  Thank you for all the responses. Equisure was something that i had thought about but havent tried. I will and see what happens!
                  http://www.chronicleofmyhorse.com/profile/Jen75

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Does anyone have any insight on how Equishure works? I looked it up on line, and the ingredients listed are monoglycerides, sodium bicarbonate, and vegetable oil. Basically, fat (lipid), baking soda, and vegetable oil. Any ideas as to what would make this product different than adding veg oil and baking soda separately?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by M. Owen View Post
                      Does anyone have any insight on how Equishure works? I looked it up on line, and the ingredients listed are monoglycerides, sodium bicarbonate, and vegetable oil. Basically, fat (lipid), baking soda, and vegetable oil. Any ideas as to what would make this product different than adding veg oil and baking soda separately?
                      It's a time-released hindgut buffer. Basically an antacid that is supposed to not take effect until it actually enters the hindgut. If you gave just baking soda and oil, or any antacid, then it would only be working in the stomach, and never make it to the hindgut.

                      Check out Kentucky Equine Research's website, as someone posted. They have some pretty interesting data on the subject, where they tested the acidity of the hindgut after grain meals and grazing, using control horses and horses being fed the Equishure.

                      On a personal note, I feed Equishure myself. I think it really did help my mare, who seems to get gassy issues quite easily if I'm not careful.
                      Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I read their site, and it explained that it did work according to their studies, but I didn't understand how it worked differently than other products. Maybe the lipids act as a buffer to help the sodium bicarbonate get to the hind gut? I've been comparing a lot of products recently with various bicarbonates and am trying to understand how one might work as compared to another.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by M. Owen View Post
                          I read their site, and it explained that it did work according to their studies, but I didn't understand how it worked differently than other products. Maybe the lipids act as a buffer to help the sodium bicarbonate get to the hind gut? I've been comparing a lot of products recently with various bicarbonates and am trying to understand how one might work as compared to another.
                          Yeah, on that specific part I don't know. I'm assuming it's coated in something that protects it from breaking down in the stomach.
                          Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Interesting article on how it all works; http://www.shady-acres.com/susan/probiotics.shtml
                            ... _. ._ .._. .._

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              My understanding from them is that it is incapsulated and the time release is activated by liquid. With that in mind if prepare feed the night before you should not top dress it w/ a liquid and let it sit. I was advised to top dress any liquids or oils when feeding because of this.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I read an interesting tid-bit the other day about how feeding a pelleted forms of concentrates has shown a 6 fold increase in colic, as opposed to a regular grain/textureized feed, and that actually colic tends to be lower in horses fed only roughage (pasture and hay) {no grain}. Here is the link to the complete info. http://equiderma.com/colic.html Scroll down the page and start reading at Here are some important and alarming facts about colic:

                                Other than all that, I would see what you could do to remedy/alleviate the cribbing issue...other straps, toys in the stall to keep the horse busy, maybe a "nibble net" to keep the horse working at hay longer instead of cribbing,...etc.. I have heard over and over that horses who crib tend to have a higher chance of colic...well, with inhaling all that extra air, I'm sure I'd need a Maalox or Gas-X or two if it were me!
                                lindasp62
                                Founder & Donor/Account Advisor
                                Brennan Equine Welfare Fund
                                http://www.brennanequinewelfarefund.com/index.html

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Can't help with stopping the colics, but for a quick fix try about 10 X-strength Tums (1,000 lb horse) dissolved in water and syringed down the throat. Works great.
                                  "If you can't feed 'em, don't breed 'em."

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by Semi75 View Post
                                    I posted on a similar thread but we've had a great deal of luck w/ Equishure and preventing gas colic symptons. There very well could be an underlying issue in your case that needs examined but also from hindgut acidosis.
                                    I very much agree - excess gas is generally cause by food fermenting rather than digesting in the gut and often this is associated with carb/sugar rich feeds. You may want to consider removing concentrated feeds and feed free choice hay instead, with supplements as needed. I have a client who's TB is finally blooming on hay, pasture and NW horse supplements only.

                                    Hay may also lack a great deal of good bacteria in his gut.

                                    Comment

                                    • Original Poster

                                      #19
                                      I feed a 12% pellet, no sweet feed and free choice timothy or timothy mix hay as well as pasture. He has been on probios, succeed, and just recently finished 6 months of U-Gard and nothing has made a difference (as well as being treated with Ulcergard after his first colic). What grains would you suggest? He is not on very much at all. Probably the equivalent of 3-4 handfuls twice a day. I did order the Equishure and that should be here in the next day or so.
                                      What would cause a horses feed to ferment instead of digest??
                                      http://www.chronicleofmyhorse.com/profile/Jen75

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by 2869 View Post
                                        7 yo unraced tb, basically a pasture pet because I dont have time to ride him. He is in good weight, easy keeper, cribs (even w/strap on) not neurotically(just annoyingly), on good pasture 8 - 12 hrs/day depending upon fly season, all you can eat timothy mix, 1/4 quart of a 12% pellet twice a day, no supplements and has a huge stall w/in&out access to small paddock whenever he is in. I have treated him for ulcers (without scoping) but no change.
                                        my morgan, who has a cush life too, is very gassy when eating any timothy (and I just got some straight tim in too). I don't know about this year's batch, but last year's tim mix tested with an unusually high wsc, which could indicate unusually high fructans, which tends to ferment in the gut (or so I'm told/read). He also had access to lots of white clover too. I discovered that the magic cocktail for extra gassiness was lots of clover + lots of tim mix. When I learned this, I managed the access of both, and seemed to be able to manage his gas. [touching wood].
                                        Being terrible at something is the first step to being truly great at it. Struggle is the evidence of progress.

                                        Comment

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