• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Thrush help?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Thrush help?

    Hey all. I'm a newbie here and my horse has been having some really bad thrush issues so it was suggested I post here for advice. I'm hoping you all can hope.

    My horse, Lex, has been getting thrush in all four feet. I've tired all the standard treatments and so far, nothing has been helping. I'm stumped. I was hoping maybe someone would have some other suggestions.

    Thanks!

  • #2
    ToDay/ToMorrow

    Try the Today or Tomorrow from Fort Dodge (dry cow mastitis). You can buy it at most farm supply places, including Tractor Supply.

    It's cheap, easy to use, and works like a champ.

    Comment


    • #3
      What treatments have you already tried?

      Comment


      • #4
        We've tried Coppertox, Thrushbuster, Thrush Stop, CleanTrax, Sugardine, and Kertatex and a few others. This thrust just won't seem to go away!

        Comment


        • #5
          I have used thrushbuster with great success. But it looks like you have already tried it. Did you follow the directions on the label accurately?

          Comment


          • #6
            With all you've tried, I'd begin to think it's either..

            1. Environment
            2. The trim (are crevices being left behind that stuff can get stuck in?)
            3. Diet inadequate somehow

            Have you talked to your farrier about it at all?
            Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!

            Comment


            • #7
              I have never come across one horse whose horrid thrush did not completely and immediately go away after a proper treatment with CleanTrax. Never. Did you do the full 45 minute soak followed by the 45 minute boot to trap the gases on each foot?

              The Podi-CIO2 Green, which is also chlorine dioxide is also very effective and much easier to use. It comes in a gel which mixes together as it comes from the bottle. Lots easier than mixing hte CleanTrax and vinegar.

              MyCaseptic is also very good but as said the CleanTrax should have worked if given the proper time.

              Must be something more going on with these feet if you did give them each the full time.

              Comment


              • #8
                Are this horse's hooves under water all the time or what?
                Perhaps you should try the Dry today or Dry tomorrow? My farrier recommends it for particularly difficult thrush although I have a hard time finding it easily around here.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by chancellor2 View Post
                  Are this horse's hooves under water all the time or what?
                  Perhaps you should try the Dry today or Dry tomorrow? My farrier recommends it for particularly difficult thrush although I have a hard time finding it easily around here.
                  ARe there no dairy farms in your area? Any farm supply store should carry it although they don't all sell it by the tube I notice frequently. When we were farming it made sense to buy the whole box but for thrush it isn't necessary. It does work quite well and the tube end makes it easy to get right in there. Today is for milking cows where tomorrow is for dry cows. I think something more is going on here though as the CleanTrax should have taken care of it for sure.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Have you tried a mixture of bleach and water? I find it clears it right up.
                    MnToBe Twinkle Star: "Twinkie"
                    http://i236.photobucket.com/albums/f...wo/009_17A.jpg

                    Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Bleach is caustic... it will hurt the frogs... Dry Today or Dry Tomorrow works wonders and won't hurt live tissue! If your horse is constantly standing in mud, put the Dry Today (or Tomorrow) on and give him a "duct tape" boot for a couple hours a day or in a dry stall. Cheap and effective.
                      Kim
                      The Galloping Grape
                      Warrenton, VA
                      http://www.GallopingGrape.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        No, Lex is out in a grassy field and it stays really, really dry. No mud in sight.

                        I will look for Dry Today or Dry Tomorrow, but I've never heard of it. There aren't many dairy farms around here at all.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by ScooterLovin8 View Post
                          No, Lex is out in a grassy field and it stays really, really dry. No mud in sight.

                          I will look for Dry Today or Dry Tomorrow, but I've never heard of it. There aren't many dairy farms around here at all.
                          Do you have a Farm and Fleet or Tractor Supply around your house?
                          Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by GallopingGrape View Post
                            Bleach is caustic... it will hurt the frogs... Dry Today or Dry Tomorrow works wonders and won't hurt live tissue! If your horse is constantly standing in mud, put the Dry Today (or Tomorrow) on and give him a "duct tape" boot for a couple hours a day or in a dry stall. Cheap and effective.
                            I've used a mixture of bleach and water all my life. I put it in a squirt bottle and just put it in the affected areas. Never had a problem with it. I wouldn't use it every day, just like I wouldn't use all the above problems everyday. Only when needed.
                            MnToBe Twinkle Star: "Twinkie"
                            http://i236.photobucket.com/albums/f...wo/009_17A.jpg

                            Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I mix copper sulphate in hot water and then put it in a squeeze bottle. Every time I clean the feet I squirt a little in the cracks and crevices. We can not buy the mastitise cream here in Canada. Even the vet doesn't have it.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by Shadow14 View Post
                                I mix copper sulphate in hot water and then put it in a squeeze bottle. Every time I clean the feet I squirt a little in the cracks and crevices. We can not buy the mastitise cream here in Canada. Even the vet doesn't have it.
                                Just what do you treat mastitis with up there? Now, I am on the Quebec border and it used to be available in Sutton and Cowansville but under a different name and manufacturer when I was dairy farming. We used to go up there to get it because at that time there was a big difference in the exchange. That was in the 70's.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by ScooterLovin8 View Post
                                  No, Lex is out in a grassy field and it stays really, really dry. No mud in sight.

                                  I will look for Dry Today or Dry Tomorrow, but I've never heard of it. There aren't many dairy farms around here at all.
                                  http://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail.h...2-00b0d0204ae5

                                  http://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail.h..._content=38672

                                  http://www.jeffersequine.com/ssc/pro...&pf_id=0034407

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by WaningMoon View Post
                                    Just what do you treat mastitis with up there? Now, I am on the Quebec border and it used to be available in Sutton and Cowansville but under a different name and manufacturer when I was dairy farming. We used to go up there to get it because at that time there was a big difference in the exchange. That was in the 70's.
                                    I don't know what they use but I tried tractor places, feed stores and finally called my vet but he told me they can not get it. I had the proper name/brand at the time and he said I was out of luck.
                                    Copper sulphate is cheap, mixes readily with water and I just use that. I also have a good sharp hoof knife handy and if I find anything that bothers me I open it up to expose it.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      I'll see if I can get it through Valley Vet. Maybe this stuff will work.

                                      I just can't figure out why he is so thrushy. With how he lives and is cared for, he shouldn't be! It's so frustrating.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Could it be something else besides Thrush?

                                        Q: My veterinarian mentioned that she was treating a horse on a nearby farm for canker. What is it? Where does it come from? And how do you treat it? Is it different from thrush?

                                        A: To the best of our knowledge, canker is an anaerobic (grows in the absence of oxygen) infection in the superficial epithelium of the hoof (the horn-producing tissues of the foot). Veterinarians believe the invading organism is a part of the bacteroides species, which is similar to what causes "footrot" in sheep. Cases usually are found in the southeastern United States, but it has been diagnosed all over the country.
                                        The bacteria associated with canker causes abnormal keratin production, or overgrowth of the horn. This excess proliferation occurs underneath the horn, as the infection spreads throughout the epithelium. The horse's owner will notice the presence of a white or gray matter that is moist and spongy and commonly appears in the sulci region of the hoof. If there is enough infection, heat might be felt in the hoof, but only in extreme situations.
                                        The mystery surrounding canker is its cause. It involves a very strict anaerobic process, and seems to have a multi-factorial pathogenesis. For research we've tried to recreate canker in the horse, but have never been successful. Our theory at this point is that canker is caused by some sort of trauma. An infection gets inside the hoof capsule and allows the horn to proliferate. It can be tough to get it out once it gets established.
                                        Canker is fairly rare, and appears only briefly in veterinary textbooks. Most texts suggest that housing a horse in unsanitary conditions causes the disease, but I've found that canker is not prejudicial. Farms with the best of stable management and those with the worst can have horses with canker. In our attempts to recreate the disease, we have packed the frog with manure after injecting what we believe is the invading bacteria, but still have been unable to prove that unsanitary conditions contribute to the onset of canker.
                                        Development of canker might have something to do with how the horse is used. Stalled horses with little exercise seem more predisposed to the disease than horses which are active and outdoors.
                                        While thrush is a necrotic process, canker is a hypertrophic pododermatitis. Both thrush and canker are found in the same region of the foot, but instead of the tar-like substance evident in horses with thrush, canker resembles rotten cauliflower. Some people say hooves with canker have a distinct odor, but I believe that thrush is much more odiferous than canker. Thrush is an aerobic process caused by another mysterious bacteria, thought to be fusobacterium necrophorus spp., which works superficially and does not undermine tissue. When thrush eats at tissue, the inner tissues of the digit are protected until bacteria gets deep enough to deteriorate more sensitive structures. Canker spreads in live tissue, without the help of oxygen.
                                        To eliminate canker, veterinarians have tried many different medications. Suggested treatment is two-fold:

                                        1. Superficial Debridement--First remove horn over the affected area. Make sure that you do this very superficially, because if you draw blood, infection will be driven deeper into the tissue. 2. Be sure to open the infected site to the air, and keep it very clean and dry. We've found that Metronidazole--an antibiotic/microbial-- applied topically or given systemically has worked the best. Systemically, there is no medicine that will cure canker if superficial debridement is not performed.
                                        After applying the topical medication, apply a clean, dry bandage that is waterproof. Canker prefers moist conditions, so you must keep the affected area dry.
                                        Horses have variable response to treatment. Some cases heal within a week or 10 days, and some cases last for months. Years ago, owners lost some horses to canker. That now is the exception rather than the rule because veterinarians are able to recognize and treat the disease early in its process. Given good, aggressive treatment, a week to 10 days of intensive therapy should have the canker under control. Once your horse is completely rid of canker, the condition is gone. I have never seen it recur. Before healing is complete, however, canker might try to return. So, just when you think you've whipped it, there it goes again.
                                        MnToBe Twinkle Star: "Twinkie"
                                        http://i236.photobucket.com/albums/f...wo/009_17A.jpg

                                        Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X