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mechanical lameness no mechanical updated on page 1

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  • mechanical lameness no mechanical updated on page 1

    Would a mechanical lameness show at the walk and not the trot?

    Update: During my horses vet check he only took a few short steps in trot on the ashfault, he showed no lameness on the lounge in either dirrection. He was non responsive to forced flexons or palpation anywhere. My vet said he is basically sound. I said he does not feel sound, handed him a video that he was off in walk and trot. I wanted radiographs, the horse had a long history of collateral ligament desmitis of his pastern joint diagnosed by MRI and had previously blocked out at the pastern joint. Radiographs revealed articular ringbone. Back when his xrays were still clean we had tried steroid injection previously gave four weeks almost soundness, IRAP have given four months of almost soundness back when his radiographs, lameness was so minimal in trot I though I was feeling things as he was much worse in walk. I had previously done loading doses of legend, adequan, recovery EQ, HA which did nothing, he had two years rest and rehabilitation his shoeing had been mesured on radiographs and was considered very balanced. Current IRAP, recovery EQ HA, and adequan is doing nothing and he is very sore although only mildly lame at the trot. I am going for arthrodoses surgery but may run a full body bone scan to make sure I have the whole pitcure. Such a heart break!
    Last edited by Fharoah; Jun. 22, 2009, 01:49 PM.

  • #2
    I don't even know what this is supposed to be. You can have rein lameness that's rider induced that can show up at certain gaits, but mechanical lameness??

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #3
      Originally posted by BornToRide View Post
      I don't even know what this is supposed to be. You can have rein lameness that's rider induced that can show up at certain gaits, but mechanical lameness??
      nope this shows up when your leading and everyone thinks it looks odd

      Comment


      • #4
        What's mechanical lameness? It's either lame or it's sound

        Comment

        • Original Poster

          #5
          Mechanical lameness is best typified by fibrotic myopathy with its characteristic gait abnormality, but can also be the result of a restriction (eg, tendon sheath restriction in annular ligament syndrome). It is important to correctly distinguish the type of mechanical lameness, eg, fibrotic myopathy from stringhalt. In fibrotic myopathy, the affected limb is pulled back and down before the end of the protraction phase, resulting in a lengthened weightbearing phase and a shortened cranial phase. The signs are most obvious at the walk. In stringhalt, the affected limb is hyperflexed during the cranial or swing phase, while the stepwise caudal jerking movement before foot contact does not occur.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Fharoah View Post
            Mechanical lameness is best typified by fibrotic myopathy with its characteristic gait abnormality, but can also be the result of a restriction (eg, tendon sheath restriction in annular ligament syndrome). It is important to correctly distinguish the type of mechanical lameness, eg, fibrotic myopathy from stringhalt. In fibrotic myopathy, the affected limb is pulled back and down before the end of the protraction phase, resulting in a lengthened weightbearing phase and a shortened cranial phase. The signs are most obvious at the walk. In stringhalt, the affected limb is hyperflexed during the cranial or swing phase, while the stepwise caudal jerking movement before foot contact does not occur.
            I think you have answered your own question

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Fharoah View Post
              Mechanical lameness is best typified by fibrotic myopathy with its characteristic gait abnormality, but can also be the result of a restriction (eg, tendon sheath restriction in annular ligament syndrome). It is important to correctly distinguish the type of mechanical lameness, eg, fibrotic myopathy from stringhalt. In fibrotic myopathy, the affected limb is pulled back and down before the end of the protraction phase, resulting in a lengthened weightbearing phase and a shortened cranial phase. The signs are most obvious at the walk. In stringhalt, the affected limb is hyperflexed during the cranial or swing phase, while the stepwise caudal jerking movement before foot contact does not occur.
              I know exactly what you mean here. Well, not referring to your question, (lameness at walk or trot), but how lameness is either painful to the horse, or it isn't.
              I have a gelding with a luxated superficial digital flexor tendon in the left hind. No less than three very good vets diagnosed him, and after the initial acute stage, the heat, swelling and soreness to him, it all eventually healed up as best it could, with no realistic hope of it ever being structurally right again. There is no treatment. This happened three years ago, and my guy is very useful and happy, pain free and more than able to get around with little evidence of injury. He bucks like a bronco at play, he canters.... well, srambles in an awkward manner, and his trot is without any rear end push at all. I ride him lightly, have never felt a smoother gait. He is fine as long as I don't make him take sharp turns, or sudden halts. Dressage is out ~ he can't use his quarters as required for that discipline.

              Anyway, although I have him on Recovery* as a maintenance aid, he's not on any pain relievers or maskers. Very happy horse, simply loves life, loves being ridden, always screams in delight to see me, runs up to be fussed with. There is no degenerative joint issues with the hock, so it appears that his condition is indeed "mechanical" lameness.

              Thanks for bringing this topic up!

              Comment

              • Original Poster

                #8
                Does machanical lameness get worse over the years. Do they have good and bad days? This is a very new concept to me.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I had a mare with this. The injury was to the hamstring (I think the horse has a hamstring) it was a big area which was rather hard to the touch...made of scar tissue in the big muscle of the rear end which made the mare unable to bring her hind leg all the way up at the walk....limited her Range of motion so to speak in the affected limb. It didn't really show at the trot and not at all at the canter. Did not affect her soundness at all really....vet said I could do what I wanted with her including some lower level jumping. I did have a surgery done to try to release it but that failed....don't recommend it. It never got better nor worse. I guess the injury can be fairly common in reining horses....if they pull muscles and ligaments or tendons during a big slide. I never knew how it happened to my filly but overall it wasn't a big deal in the end. Shouldn't affect what you want to do with your horse unless you are doing dressage then I think you would be marked down at the walk....and some may think you are riding a lame horse.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Fharoah View Post
                    Does machanical lameness get worse over the years. Do they have good and bad days? This is a very new concept to me.
                    Yeah, my guy does. Well, he's an endless puzzle anyway, with several other issues besides the luxated tendon. Actually, that hock slippage is minor compared to the front end on and off lamenesses!!

                    I notice if it's been very wet and muddy over several days, he becomes weary of trying to get the hock to give him good support. The whole leg bows out horribly ~ it pains ME to see it, but other than the tiredness he doesn't seem to be in agony. I either keep him stalled on those muddy days, or else I put hind support boots on him and turn out in a small, flat paddock.
                    I've tried special shoeing, he's best barefoot, oddly enough. As long as the ground gives good dry traction, he's as peppy as a spring colt, and he's 18 years old! The few times I ride him, it's always on a very dry day, and never do hills at all. But he's always eager and keen on striding on out, wants to trot (shuffle) and canter.... actually seems to prefer the canter, maybe because of it's rolling gait characteristic. When he's REALLY feeling high, he'll bomb around out there bucking, spinning and changing leads like an upper level dressage horse; effortlessly, fluidly and handily, no disunited gait at all!
                    ((Scratch head)) I don't understand it, but yes, the good/bad days are often, and inexplicable!

                    Comment

                    • Original Poster

                      #11
                      Originally posted by incahoots View Post
                      I had a mare with this. The injury was to the hamstring (I think the horse has a hamstring) it was a big area which was rather hard to the touch...made of scar tissue in the big muscle of the rear end which made the mare unable to bring her hind leg all the way up at the walk....limited her Range of motion so to speak in the affected limb. It didn't really show at the trot and not at all at the canter. Did not affect her soundness at all really....vet said I could do what I wanted with her including some lower level jumping. I did have a surgery done to try to release it but that failed....don't recommend it. It never got better nor worse. I guess the injury can be fairly common in reining horses....if they pull muscles and ligaments or tendons during a big slide. I never knew how it happened to my filly but overall it wasn't a big deal in the end. Shouldn't affect what you want to do with your horse unless you are doing dressage then I think you would be marked down at the walk....and some may think you are riding a lame horse.
                      Thanks for sharing. I am not sure what I am dealing and said horse has had serveral soundness exams, MRI he had an injury but sergeon considers him sound at the trot now just a lame walk. He is going in for a full soundness exam on all four by very good lameness vet, We will do bunch flexions and xrays maybe ultrasound but unfortunetly no bone scan as that is nine hours away and I just don't think I can afford it. I am hoping we can find a cause and fix it but if it is machanical I as long as he is not in pain it will be ok. I will update once he has been checked. I know this looks really bad but he is ok at the trot (by sergeon) Anyone have any ideas as to what could cause this? Shoot in the dark where would you xray, I am considering head to toe or entire right side.
                      Last edited by Fharoah; May. 24, 2009, 04:47 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Fharoah View Post
                        Mechanical lameness is best typified by fibrotic myopathy with its characteristic gait abnormality, but can also be the result of a restriction (eg, tendon sheath restriction in annular ligament syndrome). It is important to correctly distinguish the type of mechanical lameness, eg, fibrotic myopathy from stringhalt. In fibrotic myopathy, the affected limb is pulled back and down before the end of the protraction phase, resulting in a lengthened weightbearing phase and a shortened cranial phase. The signs are most obvious at the walk. In stringhalt, the affected limb is hyperflexed during the cranial or swing phase, while the stepwise caudal jerking movement before foot contact does not occur.
                        I think you have answered your own question
                        No - that was a chunk from the Merck Vet Manual Website; http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/in...m/bc/90700.htm



                        http://www.equinedesign.info/lameness1.htm

                        Mechanical Lameness
                        As the term suggests, mechanical lameness is created and maintained from a mechanical influence. This can include any form of abnormal mechanical functioning of bone, tendon, ligament, muscle or fascial tissue.
                        Mechanical lameness is not always reciprocated with pain and is most obviously presented during the horses slower and more controlled movements, such as walk.
                        During walk, the affected limb experiences a longer duration of tension as it waits for its co-working limb to complete its protraction phase.


                        The prognosis would depend entirely on the cause of the lameness. SO - until you know that, nobody can help you.
                        ... _. ._ .._. .._

                        Comment

                        • Original Poster

                          #13
                          Yes I coppied and pasted machanical lameness is a new concept to me.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Ideas on what ?
                            Why a horse we've never seen is lame ?
                            If the horse we've never seen has a mechanical lameness ?
                            If a horse we've never seen will get worse ?
                            If a horse we've never seen will get better ?

                            I'm afraid what your asking is more akin to fortune telling. The only person who can help you is your vet/diagnostician.
                            ... _. ._ .._. .._

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Could be anything from a hot nail to a pinched nerve. That's why we have vets.
                              ... _. ._ .._. .._

                              Comment

                              • Original Poster

                                #16
                                This horse has been seen by his vets, top notch vets, 12 times in the past two years he is getting another full exam ext. Equibrit good point I will see what specialist/sergeon whom I really respect and trust says when he evaluates him

                                Thankyou all who have shared there mechanical lameness stories, any more greatly appreciated!
                                Last edited by Fharoah; May. 24, 2009, 04:49 PM.

                                Comment

                                • Original Poster

                                  #17
                                  [QUOTE=Equibrit;4116205]Ideas on what ?

                                  Just came here trying to hear some experiences and to maybe learn a bit. Also does anyone have a horse "mechanically lame" at the walk with a slight head bob and short stride?
                                  Last edited by Fharoah; May. 24, 2009, 07:08 PM.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    I have a mare with fibrotic myopathy, it is not at all painful to the horse but causes a shortening of the stride on the affected hindleg due to scar tissue. She is sound at all gaits, but has the shortened forward phase of the walk in that hind leg. When in regular work, it gets MUCH better and If I ride her strong with my leg at the walk, it is not noticeable, as I showed her in dressage and hunters for several years and never had anyone even know she had it. Now that she is more or less a pasture puff, it is much more noticeable. I actually used to get "8"s on her walk in dressage asI REALLY had her hind end engaged!
                                    www.shawneeacres.net

                                    Comment

                                    • Original Poster

                                      #19
                                      [QUOTE=shawneeAcres;4116562]I have a mare with fibrotic myopathy

                                      How was it diagnosed?

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        VERY easy to diagnose this condition. You can feel the scar tissue along the hamstring down the back of her buttock. I know exactly how it happened, she was at a show when a sprinkler system went off. In spite on being tied to a pice of baling twine (supposed to break, but did not), she pulled so hard the halter literally managed to slip around her head and was choking her. In the process her hind leg slipped underneath her and tore the hamstring. This is how this type of injury occurs. She was very lame immediately and very painful over the next week. When the injury healed it left scar tissue along that ligament which feels like "rope" under neath the skin. My vet confirmed it, but I had seen this condition before. Usually is a rather common injury of horses that do jobs that requiere hind legs to be placed far underneath the body, like reining, roping and cutting, but mine was caused by the incident above.
                                        www.shawneeacres.net

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