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Mild white line disease + mild thrush: what do I need to know?

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  • Mild white line disease + mild thrush: what do I need to know?

    My horse has a mild case of white line disease in one foot. My farrier is relatively unconcerned, caught it when it started, and has been scraping the affected spot and packing it with copper sulfate. After all the rain we've had and this lovely wet clay footing, my horse has now got his seasonal bout of mild thrush. (It happens every year after the spring and fall rains and I treat it with ThrushBuster and cow mastitis ointment as soon as I start seeing signs, as instructed by farrier; it clears up quickly.) Farrier is out of town right now and I will be seeing him early next week and we will re-evaluate feet. In the meantime, given the white line, should I do anything differently about the thrush?
    "I'm not always sarcastic. Sometimes I'm asleep." - Harry Dresden

    Amy's Stuff - Rustic chic and country linens and decor
    Support my mom! She's gotta finance her retirement horse somehow.

  • #2
    Well....there are a few things that contribute to the problem....but I'm not a farrier nor do I play one on TV.

    1) moisture--can your horse get out of the mud/muck for at least 8 hours a day--in a stall with nice clean dry bedding?

    2) diet--more and more we're finding that diets high in sugars seem to contribute to chronic cases of thrush and such.

    3) trim--if the horse is getting separation of the hoof wall due to torque that opens up the hoof to infection.

    Have you tried something like Clean Trax? I've not used it but heard great things about it.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...

    Comment


    • #3
      What BuddyRoo said - in most cases we see the hoof health is being compromised by the horse's diet, making them more susceptible to conditions like this.

      Could be any of the following:
      • Diet too high in NSCs
      • Not enough zinc and copper
      • Nutrient uptake compromised by worms or ulcers (or perhaps other digestive issues)
      • Nutrient uptake interferred with by too much iron in feed and/or water
      Good info here in addition: http://www.hoofrehab.com/diet.htm

      Even if the hooves are too long and are starting to self trim, the healthy hooves generally do not have any white line issues because of it, but the unhealthy ones do.

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #4
        1) His diet is fine and managed very carefully to be low-NSC with consultation from the vet. He is a very easy keeper.
        2) Vitamin/mineral levels are checked yearly. As of one month ago, all values were within normal range.
        3) No digestive issues, no worms, and no signs of either.

        I am not asking "why does my horse have white line disease" because I have already discussed that with my farrier and vet. I am asking "do I need to do anything different about treating his mild thrush to take into account the mild white line." I'm sorry if I failed to make that clear.

        BuddyRoo, thanks for the suggestion about keeping him out of the wet. He is turned out for half the day and the rest of the day he is in a well-cleaned stall with dry bedding. Feet are picked when he comes in from his field.
        "I'm not always sarcastic. Sometimes I'm asleep." - Harry Dresden

        Amy's Stuff - Rustic chic and country linens and decor
        Support my mom! She's gotta finance her retirement horse somehow.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Renn/aissance View Post
          1) His diet is fine and managed very carefully to be low-NSC with consultation from the vet. He is a very easy keeper.
          2) Vitamin/mineral levels are checked yearly. As of one month ago, all values were within normal range.
          3) No digestive issues, no worms, and no signs of either.
          What may be normal for one horse is not for another. I your horse has issues, then something is off. You can control your horses health much more than you can the environment! It could be as simple as iron in feed and forage that competes with zinc and copper uptake, which is does not appear you have explored yet?

          I am not asking "why does my horse have white line disease" because I have already discussed that with my farrier and vet. I am asking "do I need to do anything different about treating his mild thrush to take into account the mild white line." I'm sorry if I failed to make that clear.
          Ignoring and eliminating possible root causes all you end up with is managing a chronic condition!Again, you can control your horse's health much better than you can control the environment.

          There's a reason why some horses never have issues in the same environment while others constantly break down in it - it is not the environment - it is the horse's overall health!

          And, you can take this advice or leave it - totally your choice

          Comment

          • Original Poster

            #6
            Again, I am not asking any question about the cause of his white line. I have already explored that with my vet and farrier, whose opinions I trust far more than someone on the internet, and who actually know my horse.

            I am asking if I need to do anything different when treating his thrush to take into account the white line.
            "I'm not always sarcastic. Sometimes I'm asleep." - Harry Dresden

            Amy's Stuff - Rustic chic and country linens and decor
            Support my mom! She's gotta finance her retirement horse somehow.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Renn/aissance View Post
              My horse has a mild case of white line disease in one foot. My farrier is relatively unconcerned, caught it when it started, and has been scraping the affected spot and packing it with copper sulfate. After all the rain we've had and this lovely wet clay footing, my horse has now got his seasonal bout of mild thrush. (It happens every year after the spring and fall rains and I treat it with ThrushBuster and cow mastitis ointment as soon as I start seeing signs, as instructed by farrier; it clears up quickly.) Farrier is out of town right now and I will be seeing him early next week and we will re-evaluate feet. In the meantime, given the white line, should I do anything differently about the thrush?
              Unless you see obvious signs of things getting worse, wait until your farrier comes out.

              If things have gotten worse, or if your farrier determines it is not clearing up, get Clean Trax - that will take care of thrush and white line, usually with one treatment.

              Comment


              • #8
                My horse had mild white line disease which my farrier was addressing like yours. He also got a bit of thrush in the spring due to rediculously wet clay conditions. My farrier had recommended White Lightning for the White Line and it is also used for treating thrush so I used it on the thrush as well. It worked really well for my horse. He has no thrush and the white line is just about gone.

                Comment


                • #9
                  To do for mild:

                  There are several "soak" options:

                  --Borax. 3 Tblsps in 3 inches of water, soak 30 minutes, 3 X a week. In between soaks, keep 'em dry but spray with organic Apple Cider Vinegar once a day

                  --Lysol Concentrate (the brown stuff). 1 Capful to 3 inches of water. Soak for 30 minutes once a week.

                  --A Clean Trax treatment. Best to do right after a trim. Just have all your supplies ready and at hand. Old VET-size IV bags work great!

                  Several "goo/"pack options:

                  --LifeData's Hoof Antiseptic three times a week in a diaper and Hoof Wrap overnight. On off days, liberal application of Gold Bond XS Medicated Powder.

                  --Make a mixture of Triple Antibiotic Ointment, Desitin & Yeast Infection Cream. Using a syringe, get it into every nook and cranny. Cover with dry diaper and vet wrap for the night. Remove in the a.m.

                  Quick option or for maintenance:

                  --Daily sprays of Tinactin or Lotrimin AF Athlete's Foot Spray into every crack and several good poofs of Gold Bond XS Medicated Powder.
                  <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- Being negative only makes a difficult journey more difficult. You may be given a cactus, but you don't have to sit on it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I had a mare with a severe case several years ago. We fooled around with trying to dig it out and treat it with various treatments. My farrier finally decided to do a hoof wall resection and just remove the wall upward until he hit good tissue. Then we put a shoe back on and sprayed it with tincture of iodine daily. It took a while, but it went away and NEVER came back. My farrier believes stongly that this is the only way to really get rid of it. Applying chemicals to the surface only kills the bacteria that the chemicals touch. The bacteria are anaerobic and the infection can go all the way up the hoof. You will never be able to treat that without opening it up to air. I'd talk to your farrier about it now, even if yours seems like a minor case. You can probably nip it in the bud. If he has not done many resections, see if he can help you find one who has. It needs to be done correctly. Good luck.
                    Maryanne Nicpon
                    Minglewood Sport Horses
                    Ballston Spa, NY

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      http://www.healthyhoof.com/articles/Thrush/Thrush.html
                      Being terrible at something is the first step to being truly great at it. Struggle is the evidence of progress.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by BornToRide View Post
                        What may be normal for one horse is not for another. I your horse has issues, then something is off. You can control your horses health much more than you can the environment! It could be as simple as iron in feed and forage that competes with zinc and copper uptake, which is does not appear you have explored yet?

                        Ignoring and eliminating possible root causes all you end up with is managing a chronic condition!Again, you can control your horse's health much better than you can control the environment.

                        There's a reason why some horses never have issues in the same environment while others constantly break down in it - it is not the environment - it is the horse's overall health!

                        And, you can take this advice or leave it - totally your choice
                        Seriously? She has had everything check she has therefore eliminate and is not ignoring the possible problems you have suggested.

                        What would you like her to do? Just start changing everything in her horses diet in direct opposition to her vets recommendations? Do you really feel you can better the horse community by making these suggestions?

                        If her horse tests with in the normal range of EVERYTHING and is already on low NSC diet how do you propose she adjust those things? There is no safe way to say "Yeah my horse has x issue and it could be caused by a zinc deficiency. He tested normal but I am going to change it anyways." That advice can cause more health problems for someone who wouldn't know any better! Thank goodness the OP follows her vets advice....

                        By the way if someone doesn't want your opinion on something or says that they're good but no thanks, stop shoving it down their throats, that's why so many people jump down your throat.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Seriously, I do not really care what she does or not does. I just know from experience that many vets and farriers do not have a good understanding when it comes to how diet can affect hoof health.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by nlk View Post
                            By the way if someone doesn't want your opinion on something or says that they're good but no thanks, stop shoving it down their throats, that's why so many people jump down your throat.
                            HMMM... BTR, you must be getting used to this familiar response?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by BornToRide View Post
                              Seriously, I do not really care what she does or not does. I just know from experience that many vets and farriers do not have a good understanding when it comes to how diet can affect hoof health.
                              But you have not answered how you expect her to make a decision if not based off of given, proven criteria for a healthy horse. If you can't give good quality help, which would entail how to follow up on your advice then don't give it because you could potentially be leading people to make poor life altering decisions for their horse.

                              You are advising someone to go against someone with years of experience, a wealth of knowledge, and clinical tests. That is irresponsible not only as a horse lover but also as an industry professional.

                              OP sorry to hijack the thread a little but I hate to see someone repeatedly give unsound advice especially when not asked for. On your topic I have little to offer as I have never experienced White Line disease personally. However some great Thrush remedies I have used have included simple Listerine and Bleach ( individually not used together, ever). Good luck hopefully your boy will get better

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by Renn/aissance View Post
                                Again, I am not asking any question about the cause of his white line. I have already explored that with my vet and farrier, whose opinions I trust far more than someone on the internet, and who actually know my horse.

                                I am asking if I need to do anything different when treating his thrush to take into account the white line.
                                GOOD FOR YOU! Totally agree with you!

                                Comment

                                • Original Poster

                                  #17
                                  Thanks, NLK, and I don't mind the hijack--I think it's very worthwhile, especially in this forum, to be reminded that when it comes to the horse's health, consulting with a good vet and farrier, who have professional training in their fields, is far more valuable than listening to somebody on the internet who's never even seen your horse.

                                  Incidentally, that's why I double-check everything suggested to me on COTH against existing research, and why I'm going to be looking into all of the remedies suggested here so that I have some measure of education when I discuss this with the farrier. Keep the suggestions coming; everything I research improves my knowledge of horse care and allows me to make better decisions that benefit my horse.
                                  "I'm not always sarcastic. Sometimes I'm asleep." - Harry Dresden

                                  Amy's Stuff - Rustic chic and country linens and decor
                                  Support my mom! She's gotta finance her retirement horse somehow.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    My horse got diagnosed w/ white line a few months after I bought him. He was so lame all of a sudden that we thought it was an abscess. Well, it wasn't! Part of the problem was he wasn't shoed w/ his previous owner. He had to get part of his hoof removed and was off for a good 3-4 months.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      I've used CleanTraxx with great results. However, I prefer grapefruit seed extract (aka GSE, but not to be confused with grapeseed extract).

                                      GSE is completely nontoxic and inexpensive. A little goes a long way, so one bottle will last a very long time. Furthermore, you can probably find it on the shelf at your local drug store. You can also get it online from:
                                      http://www.nutriteam.com/servlet/the...act-All/Detail

                                      Here's a story explaining how GSE solved a very tough case of whiteline disease:
                                      http://www.equinelove.com/index2.php...do_pdf=1&id=26

                                      It works great on thrush too.

                                      Good luck!
                                      Equus Keepus Brokus

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Liberty,
                                        How do you use grapefruit seed extract for thrush?

                                        Comment

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