• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

a year lame = forever lame?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • a year lame = forever lame?

    How much truth is there to this statement? I have a nagging feeling that it might be true. (heard it from a vet) I am inclined to think that my filly's sprained(?) ankle has turned into an arthritic condition after almost a year. Any ideas of how long it takes for arthritis to develop from a soft tissue injury? (inflamed joint capsule) We'll be doing some more xrays to check within the next few weeks.
    Again, would love some insight from others about this

  • #2
    I had one lame for 1 1/2 years from 5-7. We started him back without much hope. Although he has issues, he is 15 this year and does lessons 3-4 days a week. It is a real problem with balancing the soft tissue with oncoming arthritis. Soft tissue usually means no work and arthritis benefits from work! With some blips along the way, we have kept this guy in work for coming up on 8 years.
    I use the B and L solution for him. Devils claw and yucca. It really helps the pain relief so we can keep him going.
    Last edited by shea'smom; Jan. 18, 2009, 01:24 PM.
    www.ncsporthorse.com

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #3
      oops, I think this should have been in the horse care section-

      Comment


      • #4
        I do not think this is a hard and fast rule, but something to be cognizant of. You need to look at the type of injury and then the desired level after. Some ligament or hoof issues can take more than a year, but the horses are riding sound after. If you are talking about taking a horse that has been lame for a year and then doing international grand prix with them, that would probably take a miracle.

        Comment


        • #5
          If the soft tissue injury is fully healed your horse may just need some maintenance. Steroid and HA or in IRAP has been quite helpful, followed by legend and adequan and a daily supplement and lots of turnout may be helpful. Your mare might come back for light ridding with some help depending on how much you want to invest. If the mare is in chronic pain and young you could consider fusion. You could ask about tildren.

          Best wishes!

          Comment


          • #6
            I think the answer lies in the initial Dx. You have written " sprained(?)ankle". What exactly was the injury? How was it treated?
            Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.

            Remember the horse does all the work, we just sit there and look pretty.

            Comment


            • #7
              Another anecdote from Morgan-land:

              BO's prize yearling stud, running through the field, showing off how hot he was, looking over his shoulder, took a somersaulting tumble -- all the way over, didn't get up for 10 minutes. BO sure he broke his back.

              Vet comes. Dx: sprained back, torn & swollen tissues, likely to develop arthritis, never be ridable, should be put down.

              BO took a chance, loving this guy's personality too much...the perfect future stallion-- a gentleman through and through, and good lines to breed.
              She rested him a few days, until he seemed perky, then turned him back out to do as he would and let nature & good care take their courses...

              Started him at age six. Competed as high as 3rd level (never could master the flying change). Sired nearly 20 foals, including my own bay baby boy. Has been her #1 lesson horse for more than 15 years.

              So, some need a chance. Sometimes it's a loooong time. The decision as to whether the horse is worth it is dependent on a lot of factors in your own life and what the vets have to say. And, of course, whether the horse is comfortable and living a quality life through the recovery.

              Good luck; I hope there's a happy ending for your filly.
              Last edited by Bayou Roux; Jan. 18, 2009, 05:35 PM. Reason: Checked his show records-- he competed 3rd level!

              Comment


              • #8
                Depends, rebeginner on this board has a mare, who had Sweeney shoulder and EPM (treated) at the same time. Vet advice was to lay the mare up for a year. She did that, had the mare out on pasture for a year.

                Mare is now back in training (per vet's OK) and is sound.
                View my photographs at www.horsephotoguy.zenfolio.com

                Comment

                • Original Poster

                  #9
                  Originally posted by merrygoround View Post
                  I think the answer lies in the initial Dx. You have written " sprained(?)ankle". What exactly was the injury? How was it treated?
                  the initial, and subsequent diagnosis was a sprain, "synovitis"- inflammed joint capsule (right hind fetlock joint) Initially she was given an injection of steroids in the joint and put on 30 days stall rest, from which she emerged sound, then ran around and was lame on it again. Since then (that was about 7 months ago) since I was concerned about her quality of life and she was developing some bad habits on stall rest, the vets advised to just turn her out and give the injury some time. It has not improved. Although I will say I have not been successful about keeping her quiet 100% of the time. She has escaped from her pasture (don't ask) a few times, ran around and aggravated the injury. UGH

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    It depends on the individual, but my gelding was off for about a year and came back to full work. However, we did see improvement along the way -- he went from very lame to just looking a bit ouchy every once and awhile. He tore the check ligament in a front leg. We put shoes back on for support, tested and then treated for Lyme, and did hock injections (sore hocks, I'm guessing in part because he was trying to compensate for discomfort on the front, although I think they were a long time coming and would have popped up regardless), and he was 100% sound to gradually come back into work. So I guess my point is two-fold -- a long recovery period does not always indicate a terrible prognosis, although I would hope to see drastic improvement during that time. Also, I would be sure that you're not pinning all unsoundness on the original cause. Explore other options, as it sounds like you are. Something may have developed in the meantime. But if my horse were still seriously lame with minimal improvement a year later on the same leg, I would be very concerned. It sounds like you're talking to your vet, doing all the right things. Good luck!
                    Gentleman J - "Junior" - My been-there, done-that jumper

                    Send Your Love - "Serena" - Aug 10th 2009, Rest in Peace

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I know that hindsight is 20/20 and all that, but just so you know.. I have had many vets tell me to never inject a joint w/steroids and then rest the horse, to always do it in the opposite order. I would not even bother saying that except for that if I don't, well.. you know. So I am sorry about that.

                      Now - I have had many horses come sound after extended pasture rest - after watching them get more sore at times, and more lame at times, so your girl is young - I would invest in *Adequan* and MSM and a really really good trim. I would also try very hard to not watch her like a hawk and make myself crazy over every little tweak. Easier said than done, I know. Also keep in mind that any horse that was on stall rest that long is probably incredibly weak all over - tendons, ligaments, muscles - and may very well end up doing all sorts of things to herself before it's all over. Really, turning a semi-blind eye might save your sanity.
                      "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
                      ---
                      The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        [QUOTE=EqTrainer;3814735]I know that hindsight is 20/20 and all that, but just so you know.. I have had many vets tell me to never inject a joint w/steroids and then rest the horse, to always do it in the opposite order. I would not even bother saying that except for that if I don't, well.. you know. So I am sorry about that.

                        That is exactly what we did with my gelding after his collateral ligament (MRI diagnosed), I wondered in hindsight if that was the best choise? I would have rather done IRAP shockwave or stem cell, I will learn to be inquisitive if I am ever in that situation again.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          [quote=Fharoah;3814878]
                          Originally posted by EqTrainer View Post
                          I know that hindsight is 20/20 and all that, but just so you know.. I have had many vets tell me to never inject a joint w/steroids and then rest the horse, to always do it in the opposite order. I would not even bother saying that except for that if I don't, well.. you know. So I am sorry about that.

                          That is exactly what we did with my gelding after his collateral ligament (MRI diagnosed), I wondered in hindsight if that was the best choise? I would have rather done IRAP shockwave or stem cell, I will learn to be inquisitive if I am ever in that situation again.
                          What did they inject it w/? It being soft tissue, I would imagine it was not a steroid.

                          I think the reasoning behind resting before injecting is that in order for joint injections to be as effective as possible, the horse should be moving. But I *have* also had vets tell me that they do not want to inject an actual *lame* horse (with corticosteroids) with active inflammation from an injury, that they would rather rest them and once the initial inflammation is over, then inject and return to turnout or rehab. I have a horse now who my vet intends to inject before he goes back to work this spring - he had a trochanter injury - he is sound and happy on it now after pasture rest - but she wants to before he goes into work to avoid what she feels will be inevitable inflammation if she doesn't. He will also go on Adequan.

                          I really wonder if for the OP Adequan would not have been the way to do. Assuming some joint injury in a young horse, given what Adequan does, I would have thought it would have been a much better choice than a corticosteroid. Then again I wasn't there, so who knows. You can also inject Adequan IA, although I am not sure if you can do a high motion joint like a fetlock.
                          "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
                          ---
                          The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            [QUOTE=EqTrainer;3814930][quote=Fharoah;3814878]

                            What did they inject it w/? It being soft tissue, I would imagine it was not a steroid.

                            They injected Triamcinolone and Hyvisc. The radiographs changed some in that four month total rest, don't know if that was a factor or not? I tend to learn the hard way

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              She has escaped from her pasture (don't ask) a few times, ran around and aggravated the injury.
                              Hmm. Look at it this way: it hasn't really been a year if she has re-injured herself a few times. Have you thought about trying reserpine or another long-acting tranquilizer to keep her calm? I do wish you luck, soft tissue injuries are the worst. I have one that has been on the disabled list for a year and a half.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Well, the x-rays will tell you for sure. If the x-rays are not clear or inconclusive, I would start to suspect something else as the real problem.

                                Did you change her diet and how much bute is she on, if any? You want to feed them a low carb diet while recuperating, so they won't run like idiots and re-injure themselves and you do not want give them too much bute so they cannot feel the pain. There's a reason for pain - it also protects from re-injury!

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  [quote=Fharoah;3815032][quote=EqTrainer;3814930]
                                  Originally posted by Fharoah View Post

                                  What did they inject it w/? It being soft tissue, I would imagine it was not a steroid.

                                  They injected Triamcinolone and Hyvisc. The radiographs changed some in that four month total rest, don't know if that was a factor or not? I tend to learn the hard way

                                  I Just wonder if we are missing part of the puzzle here. Could you ask your vet what exactly they injected and why? That sounds like a IA (joint) injection, not a soft tissue injection. Plus soft tissue doesn't show up on rads (but of course it did/would on the MRI). Hmmmmmm. I am very curious!
                                  "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
                                  ---
                                  The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.

                                  Comment

                                  • Original Poster

                                    #18
                                    [QUOTE=EqTrainer;3815463][quote=Fharoah;3815032]
                                    Originally posted by EqTrainer View Post


                                    I Just wonder if we are missing part of the puzzle here. Could you ask your vet what exactly they injected and why? That sounds like a IA (joint) injection, not a soft tissue injection. Plus soft tissue doesn't show up on rads (but of course it did/would on the MRI). Hmmmmmm. I am very curious!
                                    EqTrainer: Thank you so much for your interest!!!! I am no longer using the vet that injected her- and that is one of the reasons why. In fact now I am VERY interested in what he put into her and will find out today. I will let you know!

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Whatever the reason for a lay-up, Icannot help but think that turning a horse out after a lay-up is begging for trouble. I would prefer seeing them hand walked (It is boring), and then sedated for the first week. Because invariably, they race around and reinjure an area that is weaker from doing nothing.
                                      Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.

                                      Remember the horse does all the work, we just sit there and look pretty.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        My horse has been on and off lame, at one point, for nearly three years! He is magical now, something I did not dare to hope at times. DO NOT give up hope. Arthritis can be dealt with, exercise, supplements, adequan...there is such much out there nowadays. It is just a matter of how much one expects them to do.

                                        Good luck!
                                        Better to ask for forgiveness, than for permission.

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X