Sport Horse Spotlight

Sandro Hit Standa Eylers

Real Estate Spotlight

Walter Moore rear view

Sale Spotlight

COTH_without Subscribe
  • Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You�re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the Forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it�details of personal disputes may be better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts, though are not legally obligated to do so, regardless of content.

Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting. Moderators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts unless they have been alerted and have determined that a post, thread or user has violated the Forums� policies. Moderators do not regularly independently monitor the Forums for such violations.

Profanity, outright vulgarity, blatant personal insults or otherwise inappropriate statements will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

Users may provide their positive or negative experiences with or opinions of companies, products, individuals, etc.; however, accounts involving allegations of criminal behavior against named individuals or companies MUST be first-hand accounts and may NOT be made anonymously.

If a situation has been reported upon by a reputable news source or addressed by law enforcement or the legal system it is open for discussion, but if an individual wants to make their own claims of criminal behavior against a named party in the course of that discussion, they too must identify themselves by first and last name and the account must be first-person.

Criminal allegations that do not satisfy these requirements, when brought to our attention, may be removed pending satisfaction of these criteria, and we reserve the right to err on the side of caution when making these determinations.

Credible threats of suicide will be reported to the police along with identifying user information at our disposal, in addition to referring the user to suicide helpline resources such as 1-800-SUICIDE or 1-800-273-TALK.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it�s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users� profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses � Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it�s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who�s selling it, it doesn�t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions � Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services � Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products � While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements � Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be �bumped� excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues � Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators� discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the �alert� button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your �Ignore� list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you�d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user�s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 5/9/18)
See more
See less

Your Ulcer Prone Horse and You: a Crash Course in Ulcer Care

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Your Ulcer Prone Horse and You: a Crash Course in Ulcer Care

    So as there have been a slew of ulcer-related posts lately, I am going to compile all of the "need to know" information into one place.

    Diagnosis
    First, as most ulcer symptoms are a bit vague and could be a lot of different things, you should always get your horse scoped. This also helps with developing a treatment plan and knowing whether your horse has a mild case or a severe case. In case you aren't aware of how vague these symptoms can be, they include but are not limited to: sluggish, poor performance, behavioral changes, spookiness, grumpiness, dull coat, girthyness, sensitivity on belly, colic symptoms, mild/prolonged colic, excessive lying down, going off feed, and the list goes on indefinitely. So, scoping or at least a proper diagnosis by a vet should be given before heading into the treatment and management phases of ulcers (because ulcers are expensive and it's better to know you're putting money in the right place than barking up the wrong tree).

    Treatment
    As most people know, who have given advice on ulcers, I am a scientific-based person so I am a Gastrogard/Ulcergard person. They are the only FDA approved treatment and preventative medications for ulcers, therefore have efficacy studies proving their results. Ranitidine is also used for treatment but has less efficacy than Gastrogard/Ulcergard. There are multiple other omeprazole-based treatments, including one by horseprerace and Abprazole and so on. Their efficacy has not been tested but some on here have had pretty good results. I would like to note that with all omeprazole products, the horse should be tapered slowly or they can experience an influx of acid in the stomach.

    If you are working with a vet, as advised in the diagnosis section, you will go over a treatment plan. I wound up doing 28 days of a full tube, 14 days of half a tube, and 14 days of a 1/4 tube.

    Feeding
    Your best bet is to do as little grain as possible as grain causes an influx of acid in the stomach (causing ulceration in the foregut) and might not be completely broken down in the foregut (causing ulceration in the hindgut) unlike forage, which brings an influx of saliva into the stomach and acts as a natural buffer against stomach acid.

    Forage should be fed at 1-2 lbs per 100 lbs of body weight. That means that a 1000lb horse needs 10-20 lbs of hay or grass a day. I try and lean towards 2lbs as long as the horse doesn't gain too much weight. If the horse is hoovering down it's hay you can use as slow feeding hay net easily purchased online through the big tack shop companies (this is also good if you need to feed less hay for a horse that is gaining weight).

    Oat Hay 22.1% NSC
    Barley Hay 20.4% NSC
    Alfalfa Hay 11.3% NSC
    Bermudagrass Hay 13.6% NSC
    Grass Hay 13.8% NSC (not sure what "grass hay")
    Grass Pasture 12.1% NSC

    As for feeding, since your horse will be provided with pretty much all of the NSC s/he needs through the hay, you should aim towards an NSC feed (NSC means non-structural carbohydrates, in short: sugar and starch). The biggest culprits in feed, behind the obvious (molasses) are the cereal grains:

    Corn: 73.3% NSC
    Barley: 61.7% NSC
    Oats: 54.1% NSC
    Wheat Middling: 32.0% NSC
    Wheat Bran: 31.1% NSC
    Rice Bran: 21.2% NSC

    The lowest NSC percentages are from the forage category, along with soy.

    Soybean Meal: 16.2% NSC
    Beet Pulp: 12.3% NSC
    Alfalfa Cubes: 10.2% NSC
    Alfalfa Pellets: 9.3% NSC
    Soybean Hulls: 6.3% NSC

    I don't actually advise L/S feeds unless you have an IR horse as they could be too low in NSC for a normal horse (thus depriving your horse of a properly balanced nutrition although we think "NSC BAD" NSC's do play a vital role in a horse's well being) but these are fairly low. I would also note that most horses do well on NSC ranges below 25%, I like to keep ulcer-prone horses between 10% and 20% so as to not spike the blood sugar or deprive the body or the "steady flow" of NSC the horse has been getting through it's hay. So a few of the NSC grains from the "top" grain companies are:
    - Purina Strategy Healthy Edge (17-18%) - Wheat Middlings, Dehydrated Alfalfa Meal, Ground Soybean Hulls, Cane Molasses, Dried Beet Pulp
    Purina Ultium Competition (15%) - Wheat Middlings, Ground Soybean Hulls, Dehydrated Alfalfa Meal, Cane Molasses, Dried Beet Pulp
    - Purina Equine Senior (17%) - Wheat Middlings, Dehydrated Alfalfa, Cane Molasses, Ground Peanut Hulls, Dried Beet Pulp
    - Triple Crown Complete (20.6%- a little high IMO) - Shredded Beet Pulp, Cane Molasses, Whole Oats, Soybean Oil, Dehulled Soybean Meal
    - Triple Crown Senior (11.7%) - Alfalfa Meal, Wheat Middlings, Shredded Beet Pulp, Soybean Hulls, Cane Molasses
    - Pennfield Fibergized (12%) - Wheat Middlings, Dried Molasses Beet Pulp, Soybean Hulls, Cane Molasses, Soybean Meal
    - Penfield Fibergized Omega (12%) - Wheat Middlings, Soybean Hulls, Dried Molasses Beet Pulp, Cane Molasses, Soybean Meal
    - Pennfield Ultra Senior (19%) -
    - Buckeye Nutrition Safe n' Easy (12.5% pelleted) - Soybean Hulls, Wheat Middlings, Oat Mill By-Product, Heat Processed Soybeans, Dehydrated Alfalfa Meal
    - Buckeye Nutrition Safe n' Easy (16.5% texturized) - Soybean Hulls, Wheat Middlings, Whole Oats, Soybean Meal, Dehydrated Alfalfa Meal
    - Buckeye Nutrition Senior (16.2% pelleted) - Soybean Hulls, Wheat Middlings, Ground Corn, Oat Mill By-Product, Heat Processed Soybeans
    - Buckeye Nutrition Grow n' Win (13%) - Dehulled Soybean Meal, Heat Processed Soybeans, Wheat Middlings, Maize Distillers Dried Grains, Dehydrated Alfalfa Meal
    - Buckeye Nutrition Grow n' Win Alfa (16%) - Soy Hulls, Wheat Middlings, Heat Processed Soybeans, Ground Corn, Maize Distillers Dried Grains
    - Blue Seal Trotter (20.1%) - Dehydrated Alfalfa Meal, Soybean Hulls, Wheat Middlings, Cane Molasses, Oat Mill By-Product
    This is just a short list, click here or click here for more information on NSC grains. They're a bit out-dated in part, but are fairly well put together lists.

    Some horses don't respond well to soy, and may do better on a beet pulp and alfalfa cubes/pellets mix with added vitamins and minerals rather than a feed concentrate.

    Alfalfa is also the staple of an ulcer-prone horse's diet because it's high in calcium and is theorized to act like tums on the equine stomach. This also means that you need to be aware of your horse's phosphorus intake as the horse's calcium : phosphorus ration should be 1:1 or 2:1. Phosphorus can be added through rice bran, the lowest NSC of the "cereal grains", or by adding the proper supplement for what your horse needs.

    Management
    So once you have the diagnosis, treatment, and feeding down; then comes management. This is the hard part. An ulcer prone horse can develop ulcers in as little as 3 days in response to stressful situations. The problem is identifying what your horse's stressors are. Common stressors can be, but are not limited to: moving barns, horse shows, leaving the farm for any reason, stall/pasture buddy leaving/moving, positional change in the herd, more intense training, being put into private turnout, being put into group turnout, and I could go on forever with this list. The point is, you need maintenance care.

    Some people keep their horses on a low dose of omeprazole, or a product like SmartGut Ultra (I'm a big fan of SmartPak products simply because they have a 100% happiness guarantee). There's also SUCCEED, U-Gard (and U-Gard Pellets), Neigh-Lox (and Neigh-Lox Advanced), TractGard, U-7 Gastric Aid, Grand Digest, Allay, Level pH, and more.

    If your horse is going to be under stress for a few hours (say traveling to a clinic, being ridden, and going home), your best bet is Ranitidine given and hour before load-up and given every 8 hours until your horse returns home. For particularly anxious horses you might be advised to dose the horse onces the night before for maximum efficacy.

    If you are traveling for an extended period of time or moving to a new place, take care to provide your horse with omeprazole during the whole endeavor. I have always been told to give half a tube a day for three days before travel and continue until three days after returning home (taper to 1/4 tube for the 3 days at home at the end of the endeavor). If this is a move to a new barn, you may need dose for longer. Three days beforehand, and then up to a week or two once arrived and settled in at the new barn, depending upon the horse. Make sure to always taper off omeprazole for the above stated reasoning in the "treatment" section. You may also need to treat with ranitidine or omeprazole when making big changes at the barn for the horse such as switching stall buddies or pasture mates or starting heavy training.

    Ulcer horses should also be kept out as much as possible with forage available 24/7. As state above the saliva helps to coat and protect the stomach from the stomach acid; being outside also reduces stress. Being confined to a stall is considered "stressful" to a horse and can agitate ulcers. For an ulcer-prone horse that is required to stay in for long periods of time, having hay free-choice and toys can be a stress reliever.

    Final Notes
    Ulcer horses are complicated. They're like balancing a pyramid upside down. You'll constantly have to tweak your "program" for your ulcer-prone horse and just when you think you've got it right, s/he'll decide to get ulcery just because s/he can.




    disclaimer
    I am in no way a veterinarian and advise seeking a professional opinion before doing any treatments or ulcer care. This is all accumulated knowledge from research and experience and in now way the "only way" of dealing with an ulcer-prone horse. I am also in no-way responsible for a horse owner's lack of judgement in treating ulcers after reading this column, or the death or injury of a horse based upon information provided here (whether followed correctly or not).

  • #2
    You should put this in the FAQ's up top, if it's valid info it deserves not to slide down off the bottom of the page. Certainly the NSC values are useful to have all in one place.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #3
      Thank you, I'll do that. I'm working on a complete list of NSC values vs Protein vs Fat vs Fiber list as well so I'll post one of those as well when I finish it and have more UTD information.

      Comment


      • #4
        Disagree. Treating a horse isn't going to hurt anything but your wallet. The only way I would scope first is if insurance required it. With most things horse related the word always does not belong.
        McDowell Racing Stables

        Home Away From Home

        Comment

        • Original Poster

          #5
          Originally posted by Laurierace View Post
          Disagree. Treating a horse isn't going to hurt anything but your wallet. The only way I would scope first is if insurance required it. With most things horse related the word always does not belong.
          You should never start pumping your horse full of medication without at least getting a proper diagnosis from a vet (as it says in the rest of my "Diagnosis" paragraph). Advising people to do otherwise is unethical. "Should always" and "always" are two different things, as well. "Should always" means that if you have the means to do so: do it. "Always" means you have to, no ifs ands or buts.

          Also, if your horse is covered by insurance and you are thinking of going ahead and treating for ulcers: you only get one go-around. Meaning, you should scope, treat, and re-scope before ulcers are "no longer covered" by insurance. Just because insurance "doesn't require" it doesn't mean it shouldn't be done.

          Comment


          • #6
            Never is another word I would not use when dealing with horses.
            McDowell Racing Stables

            Home Away From Home

            Comment

            • Original Poster

              #7
              Originally posted by Laurierace View Post
              Never is another word I would not use when dealing with horses.
              I feel like you're just attempting to heckle me at this point.

              Comment


              • #8
                I am sorry you feel that way. I don't believe there is room for absolutes in the horse world. For your 1 always, I can give you 100 nevers so just avoid them altogether and evaluate every horse on their own merit.
                McDowell Racing Stables

                Home Away From Home

                Comment

                • Original Poster

                  #9
                  Originally posted by Laurierace View Post
                  I am sorry you feel that way. I don't believe there is room for absolutes in the horse world. For your 1 always, I can give you 100 nevers so just avoid them altogether and evaluate every horse on their own merit.
                  I would like to point out that I'm not attempting to talk about the "horse world" I am only talking about Ulcers and Ulcer Prone horses, a diagnosis that cannot easily be reached without a Vet as any of the symptoms could mean 100 different things. The diagnosis can only be confirmed with a scope, but most horses are treated without confirmation and a surprising number treat without a proper diagnosis from a Vet. Treating a horse without an ulcer diagnosis could potential worsen whatever the actual cause of the symptoms are wether by the treatment or just lack of treatment of the true problem.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Having been through the entire ulcer process, your post should most definitely be helpful to someone starting out down the "my horse might have an ulcer road." God what a long and miserable road! I will say I am an absolute believer in Pop Rocks. Good luck to anyone working through the ulcer process!

                    Comment

                    • Original Poster

                      #11
                      Originally posted by quarterhorse4me View Post
                      Having been through the entire ulcer process, your post should most definitely be helpful to someone starting out down the "my horse might have an ulcer road." God what a long and miserable road! I will say I am an absolute believer in Pop Rocks. Good luck to anyone working through the ulcer process!
                      Thank you! I know how frustrating that road can be! I did a lot of hair pulling out myself when I started it a year ago with my mare. It's been a long road, and I'm sure she'll give me a run for my money but I've done a lot of research now and can at least stand a chance against her ever-stressed tummy!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by yourcolorfuladdiction View Post
                        You should never start pumping your horse full of medication without at least getting a proper diagnosis from a vet (as it says in the rest of my "Diagnosis" paragraph). Advising people to do otherwise is unethical.
                        I don't know about that. You've just advised everyone to medicate their horse as a preventive for any sort of stressful event -- with this I wholeheartedly agree!

                        I can't argue against the wisdom of scoping, though I have never done it and have treated ulcers many times. A short course of omeprazole can be a valuable diagnostic tool -- just sayin'.

                        Comment

                        • Original Poster

                          #13
                          Originally posted by LarkspurCO View Post
                          I don't know about that. You've just advised everyone to medicate their horse as a preventive for any sort of stressful event -- with this I wholeheartedly agree!

                          I can't argue against the wisdom of scoping, though I have never done it and have treated ulcers many times. A short course of omeprazole can be a valuable diagnostic tool -- just sayin'.
                          That part would, again, be after a diagnosis. And most vets will advise the same (as, if I'm reading your coment right, you also agree with).

                          I do agree ranitidine and omeprazole can be good diagnostic tools I've also seen horses with ulcers that didn't show any change until the full two months were almost through. I feel that instructing someone that has never handled an ulcer horse before to treat without a diagnosis isn't correct. This wasn't meant for those who have experienced ulcer horses before, it's for those that haven't and having a good vet support system is generally better than a forum support system as we can't do anything (except advise seeking a vet) if it turns out to be something other than ulcers.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I think your post is helpful. I've been dealing with ulcers now for 8 years. I have learned the difference between hind gut and fore gut ulcers, and the difference in symptoms and treatment. I don't scope first. Or at all. Local vets have never heard of ulcers, nor consider them as a possibility, nor recognize the symptoms, nor own a scope. Better vets that are farther from me usually just dispense omeprazole without scoping, unless the owner wants to scope for some reason. So much can be missed with a scope at the best of times, and hind gut ulcers won't show up anyway.

                            To add to your post, there is a good essay available called "Equine Ulcers- You really need to know more!" , written by Kerry J Ridgway, DVM, Institute for Equine Therapeutic Options. I don't know how to post a link here, sorry. But perhaps someone else can. I found this essay helpful.

                            My horses live out, in a herd, most of the time, or together in paddocks. They eat pasture when "out", and hay off the same pasture when in training. My hindgut case, when I figured out what the problem might be, did not improve with six months turned out with the herd (like I thought she would). Came in in the spring just the same. Only improved with treatment with a product called "Equine Choice", which is B vitamins, brewer's yeast, and protease enzyme. It was recommended to me, and it is the ONLY thing that worked for her (I tried multiple other things, including omeprazole). The other ulcer case I have is a fore gut ulcer case, which omeprazole works on this one. She colics, classic ulcer colic, legs in the air, laying on her back. She started this as a weanling, when she started cribbing the day she was weaned. She has ulcer flare ups when coming in from pasture, onto hay. Hay is available 24/7. Hay is about 50% alfalfa. She gets no grain. She gets a small amount of complete extruded feed with beet pulp when in training. She also gets ulcer flare ups in mid summer, in the intense heat. So now that I know this, I can treat in advance. She has never had bute in her life, and never raced. Farm raised and owned. She is an over achiever in every way, very sensitive, very smart, a fantastic horse. She went to her first "off the farm" jumping clinic this summer, to see if she would survive it. She did, had a wonderful time. No stress. No ulcer, no colic, no problems. Sigh. Will try a horse show next summer, maybe. See if she survives that.
                            www.cordovafarm.weebly.com

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I did a preventative course of Gguard on the old guy when he was failing to eat well and it did help, no scoping done, but IMO OP has collected a lot of useful information in one place. It gets really old to use the search function and then have to come on here and ask the same questions, just a different way. Now to just get JB to write an essay on current best practice in deworming!
                              Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
                              Incredible Invisible

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Here's the link to the Dr. Ridgway article...really good, thanks!

                                http://www.drkerryridgway.com/articl...cle-ulcers.php
                                "As a rule we disbelieve all the facts and theories for which we have no use."- William James
                                ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

                                Proud member of the Wheat Loss Clique.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  I would like to interject and clarify...

                                  Since EVERY horse is ulcer prone, I believe every horse deserves the benefit of preventive ulcer medication during high-stress times, regardless of whether the horse has ever had a diagnosis of gastric ulceration.

                                  That is why when I bought my last horse, as a weanling, I had the breeder administer Gastrogard for three days before I picked him up and then I continued to give him the medication during the trailer ride and for several days after I brought him home.

                                  I administer omeprazole whenever I take him places, and have been doing so since I started taking him to horse shows and clinics at age two. Same for my older horses -- they get omeprazole before and during shows/clinics and other stressful occasions.

                                  Why should I wait for him to get ulcers and then get a diagnosis of ulcers via gastroscope when I KNOW the odds of him getting ulcers are probably 90 percent? I do not want any of my horses to experience pain or to associate horse shows and other events with stomach pain. Especially not my youngster during these formative years.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    I think it's a good summary. I would modify the alfalfa section to say it is good in cations, that's calcium and magnesium. Cations DO buffer stomach acid and alfalfa is excellent for ulcer-prone horses. Managing diet with good forage and cation-rich hay is very important for ulcer-prone horses. Also, feeding 5-10 TUMS 30 min before a stressful event can really help a stress-prone horse. Tums comes in flavors that horses like. I'm in the camp that people should scope to find out if their horse actually has ulcers or not. It costs about $220, which is manageable even if you don't have insurance. It's useful to know if your horse is acting stupid and a) has extensive bleeding ulcers that you need to know he's prone to developing or b) has very mild or no ulcers despite his stupid behavior and stressful (*move across country* or *weeklong stabled show* or *debilitating sickness* or *whatever can stress a horse out*). This answer helps any owner know what their horse can or cannot handle despite their behavior/all of the rumors about which part of the horse that's reactive means it has ulcers. Omeprazole is the best treatment/preventative out there due to the mechanism of action. At the very least, the preventive treatment doesn't hurt, especially in times of stress, and can prevent ulcers from forming.
                                    Proud member of the Colbert Dressage Nation

                                    Comment

                                    Working...
                                    X