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Scariest foot rads you'll ever see on COTH...

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  • Scariest foot rads you'll ever see on COTH...

    So whaddaya think, guys, should we put him down?

    Right front 1.

    Front view

    RF side 2

    Current vet is wondering whether, on TOP of all the other problems, there is some actual calcification of the DDFT going on. Sounds sensible to me - you can see a line which MIGHT be that - but I'm neither a vet nor a farrier and would loff to know what y'all think. As well as any thoughts from the pros on the shoeing, though I confess I'm not prepared to change it without some serious empirical data suggesting why I should!

    Here is why.
    "The standard you walk by is the standard you accept."--Lt. Gen. David Morrison, Austalian Army Chief

  • #2
    WOW. That's pretty impressive.

    (Do his toes look *really* long to anyone else?)

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #3
      Originally posted by amastrike
      So... what the heck IS that? My cripple's bad knee is less scary than that, and he's pretty darn crippled.
      The full laundry list is high and low ringbone, both sides, as well as sidebone, a mostly fused coffin joint, and there is some navicular syndrome going on as well, but you can't really see it any more. It was more obvious on rads from 10 years ago, which, sadly, I no longer have.

      Simkie, if I had one criticism to make of the shoeing job that would be it... But in my experience if we try to back him up too much, he can't break over as well.
      "The standard you walk by is the standard you accept."--Lt. Gen. David Morrison, Austalian Army Chief

      Comment


      • #4
        Is he fused into that broken back angle, or is that just the way he's shod?

        If it works for him, it works for him! Give Mr Avery what he needs But after years of looking at Blush's radiographs and having the vets say "bring the breakover back to *here*" those long toes make me itch! The shortest we've got Blush put the breakover JUST in front of the tip of the coffin bone, which is a good inch or inch and a half shorter than Avery!

        Comment

        • Original Poster

          #5
          He's a brave old TB who just does NOT know the meaning of the words "I can't." And he has such a huge lust for life... Not a thing goes on, anywhere on this farm, that he doesn't know about (and he probably started it!). But you can see now why we spoil him so rotten. I always say he gets carrots just for waking up in the morning!
          "The standard you walk by is the standard you accept."--Lt. Gen. David Morrison, Austalian Army Chief

          Comment

          • Original Poster

            #6
            Originally posted by Simkie View Post
            Is he fused into that broken back angle, or is that just the way he's shod?
            He's fused into it. The fusion is really a PITA b/c as the feet grow out the angle gets progressively more disastrous.
            "The standard you walk by is the standard you accept."--Lt. Gen. David Morrison, Austalian Army Chief

            Comment


            • #7
              Poor horse Medio lateral imbalances of CB and fusion to ground parallel when it should have a slight angle. I'd pull his shoes to prevent further damage from unnecessary metal concussion of the shoes if he indeed still moves as well as he does in the video. That pounding will most likely only increase the ringbone.
              So whaddaya think, guys, should we put him down?
              I must say I am taken a bit back by the jovial nature of this comment - I just can't seem to find the humor in the comment, sorry

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by War Admiral View Post
                So whaddaya think, guys, should we put him down?

                Right front 1.

                Front view

                RF side 2

                Current vet is wondering whether, on TOP of all the other problems, there is some actual calcification of the DDFT going on. Sounds sensible to me - you can see a line which MIGHT be that - but I'm neither a vet nor a farrier and would loff to know what y'all think. As well as any thoughts from the pros on the shoeing, though I confess I'm not prepared to change it without some serious empirical data suggesting why I should!

                Here is why.

                They are really that scary, this one is......

                Comment


                • #9
                  Wow those are some awesome xrays. Can you post photos of the feet as well?

                  I see a lame horse in the video, I don't know about putting him down, that is your call based on quality of life.

                  But I don't think I'd make this horse trot anywhere.

                  Is he an OTTB? What caused that. Does the hoof capsule reflect the bony protrusions that I see on the coffin bone?

                  More pix pleeeeeaaaaasseeeeeee

                  Regards,

                  Comment

                  • Original Poster

                    #10
                    Originally posted by BornToRide View Post
                    I must say I am taken a bit back by the jovial nature of this comment - I just can't seem to find the humor in the comment, sorry
                    Sorry, but barefoot Nazis REALLY Need Not Apply on this thread. Tried it twice. He abscessed in BOTH fronts simultaneously, and could not walk ten feet. I will nevereverEVER do that to the old guy again. This is non-negotiable, capisce? So don't even bother. Just move along, and go try to convince someone else, K?

                    Sorry if the humor offended you. You kinda have to be on the ground here to find it amusing - watch him JUMPING 5' verticals out of his pasture whenever he dang well feels like it (he lands on the other one) and winning ALL the pasture races against zippy little barrel-bred QH half his age!

                    If there is a moral to the HRH Avery story, it's not sense of humor or lack thereof, it's PLEASE, people, DON'T perform neurectomies on horses to keep them jumping in the show ring. Because this is what their feet will end up looking like at age 23. And they're not all Avery. Some of them really cannot take it. He's a medical miracle.
                    "The standard you walk by is the standard you accept."--Lt. Gen. David Morrison, Austalian Army Chief

                    Comment

                    • Original Poster

                      #11
                      Originally posted by J.D. View Post
                      They are really that scary, this one is......
                      Wow, J.D., that one really is scary. Do you mind if I ask what happened?
                      "The standard you walk by is the standard you accept."--Lt. Gen. David Morrison, Austalian Army Chief

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        What a brave old man! Those are really REALLY scary rads!! Is the lameness in the video related to this? It looks like its in his hind end, but I could be wrong.
                        Eventing-A-Gogo: Adventures of a Barefoot Event Horse and her Human
                        The Reeling: An Unexpected Mareventure

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Sorry WA, but he does look pretty lame in the video. You're not still working him like this, right? He is probably a typical stoic TB like my old mare. But then again, she hasn't had to work in years...I would never consider it.

                          Poor guy, those are terrible rads...

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            The horse is very lame in that video. Some horses will just ALWAYS display gait abnormality regardless of how comfortable they really are. With the fusion, your horse is probably unable to travel normally. May not mean he's in "pain" but it's just physics, you know.

                            I agree toes look long. But this horse's case is so complex, it would be hard for "outsiders" to give specifics on what to change. It would be pure speculation without any fact or basis.

                            BornToRide - Sometimes you HAVE to maintain a good sense of humor, because if you don't, you'll drive yourself into the grave with worry and sadness. I own a horse whose feet challenge me on a daily basis and a good humor and attitude is the only way to get through it.

                            One thing I will agree with though - please stop working this horse. Turn him out in a huge field with other horses, keep the hay pilees split way up so they have to move and walk a lot and leave it at that. You've posted before that he can't wear hoof boots because they irritate the calcifications on the pasterns, and that he isn't comfortable working on pavement, etc.... so it would seem to me that the chance of damage due to work is greater than any preceived benefit to either you or the horse.

                            We don't win gold medals for keeping them working when they shouldn't be. We earn gold medals for ensuring their hapiness and comfort, even if it impinges upon our own.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Oh I forgot to say - I can't tell what kind of shoes your horse has, but I would be curious if Ron Alders on horseshoes.com thought his banana shoes would be beneficial in a case like this.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by Auventera Two View Post
                                Oh I forgot to say - I can't tell what kind of shoes your horse has, but I would be curious if Ron Alders on horseshoes.com thought his banana shoes would be beneficial in a case like this.
                                Interesting because the application of a banana shoe was going to be my suggestion too.

                                On the Obel scale of lameness, how would you score this horse?

                                I ask because you seem to be seeing much more lameness than I am seeing.

                                Based solely on the video, I wouldn't be so quick to think it is time to put this horse down.

                                Comment

                                • Original Poster

                                  #17
                                  Trust me, guys, he only does a little bit of work any more. He works himself harder in the pasture... He occasionally goes for a walk-only trail ride around the farm (half an hour tops) or a mostly walking drive on the roads - again, half an hour tops and NO hills thank you! Only time we jog a bit is if he has to cross a busy intersection.

                                  He's actually come a long, long way from where we started. He was non-weight bearing 100% on it when I got him at the feedlot. But he asked for a chance, and he got it. Nowadays he's spoiled rotten and gets everything he wants whenever he wants it, and his chief job is Pet. We do try to think up things to keep him entertained - the latest is teaching him to stand still so kids can practice roping off him (!! hey, this stuff happens when you end up at a QH barn...). He enjoys having a *little* something to do, it makes him feel important - but we don't ask him to do very much except enjoy life.

                                  Ritazza - Yeah, his right hip is pretty arthritic. Hocks and stifles are surprisingly OK for an ex-jumper. He gets Legend and regular massages.

                                  He's shod in steel half-rounds. I've seen those banana shoes, not sure exactly what they are intended to do? We're always looking for options but most end up failing simply b/c of the fusion - you can't try to remodel it in some other direction at this late date, and I frankly consider we're really darn lucky that it remodeled itself at all. Can't keep bar shoes on; NB crippled him; Easywalkers DO minimize concussion and DO help him build a little more heel and he CAN keep an Easywalker bar shoe on, but they destabilize the structure sufficiently that he abscesses sooner or later. The half-rounds have worked the best.
                                  "The standard you walk by is the standard you accept."--Lt. Gen. David Morrison, Austalian Army Chief

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Yeah, the horse looks like he's being beaten to be driven

                                    I've followed HRH Avery's stories for quite a while now. That is NOT a horse, in that video, who is even thinking about stopping doing what he's doing Sure, he's lame, but from the comments I expected him to be hobbling LOL

                                    WA, one comment caught my eye, and I wonder if you (or Rick) can explain?
                                    But in my experience if we try to back him up too much, he can't break over as well.
                                    I'm having trouble wrapping my head around why bringing the BO back would cause him to not be able to break over as well

                                    Thanks for posting this - very interesting! We don't often get to see the xrays that go along with a condition like this
                                    ______________________________
                                    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      I am amazed at how well he goes with feet that look like that. A testament to your care and his heart. I have a mare now that doesn't react to pain and it is quite a burden to be sure we are treating them properly. But it endears them to you like nothing else. Here is to many more years together.
                                      “If you are irritated by every rub, how will your mirror be polished?”
                                      ? Rumi






                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        No no, I wasn't saying that based on the video - put the horse down. I was just saying he looks very lame. A lot of tension in his back and hindquarters. I'm not saying head bobbing 3-legged lame. I'm saying the horse's gait does not look easy and unrestrained. It looks like there's a problem. And truthfully - I looked at the video before I looked at the rads. I would say the only one who knows if the horse should be put down is his owner.

                                        Comment

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