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Proximal suspensory desmitis ~operation~

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  • Proximal suspensory desmitis ~operation~

    Hi

    my mare has been diagnosed with proximal suspensory desmitis after a grulling 5 months of vets saying there is nothing wrong, she has finally been diagnosed. she has it in both hinds the right is worse!

    we have decided to go for the operation fasciotomy and nervectomy (sp?)

    just woundering if anyone has had any experiences of suspensory injuries or the operation and what was your outcome?

    the op is on monday so any spare jingles would help please!

    also what did you have to do post surgery?

    thanks kelly

  • #2
    I'd love to hear how the surgery goes and what the prognosis is. I have two elderly rescued horses, both with full-blown DSLD/ESPA and failed suspensories. Has your horse been evaluated for this disease?
    I hope the surgery goes well. I have taken a horse through a bi-lateral neurectomy (I assume that's what you means?), and recovery was uneventful. You do a lot of post op bandaging, so save yourself some money and ask ahead of time what bandaging supplies you will need and order them online instead of paying top dollar at the surgeon's!

    Comment


    • #3
      Stem cells for DSLD

      Interesting thread. I have a horse who is a possible DSLD. In discussions with my vet he suggested using IV stem cells as a treatment. They harvest the stem cells from the horses own fat.

      DOes anyone have any experience of this?

      I'd be fascinated to hear it.
      MW
      Melyni (PhD) PAS, Dipl. ACAN.
      Sign up for the Equine nutrition enewsletter on www.foxdenequine.com
      New edition of book is out:
      Horse Nutrition Handbook.

      www.knabstruppers4usa.com

      Comment


      • #4
        Ditto...

        My horse also has PSD but in his off fore. He pulled the ligament in February and had 4 weeks box rest (it was the most we could do - he kept injuring himself (and me) by flipping out in his box); he seemed to come sound so was given limited turnout and eventually put back in his big field. All seemed to be going well until the lameness returned and now the vet has suggested the same surgery you are talking about. I believe the post-op treatment involves a minimum of 6 weeks box-rest with gradually increasing in-hand exercise, as well as plenty of bandaging and feeding lots of forage (NO CEREALS/ STARCH!!!) I would be really interested in hearing how the operation goes and the prognosis given by your vet...If you have the time perhaps you could add a post to this thread or email me to keep me posted?

        Good luck! I hope it goes well :-)

        Comment


        • #5
          Fasciotomy and PRP

          This was the recommendation of my vet when my horse developed a PSLD on his right hind last month. To the extent that I, a layperson, could find any data, there seems to be more on the benefit of Stem Cell therapy harvested from fat, or even bone marrrow. However, timing issues led the surgeon to feel we'd do just as well with Platelet Rich Plasma injected at the time of surgery.

          Apparently, the surgery went well, although my horse (TB) did take awhile to wake up. Brought him home 2 days later with instructions to remove the bandage the next day and leave him in standing wraps for a week. Allowed out to hand graze for 15 min daily. Put him on Calm'n'Cool - not sure if it's made any difference, although he's pretty relaxed. Have almost gotten him completely off his regular pellet and changed to a high fat one. He'd been body clipped a week prior to the injury, and he's a TB - he's likely to need more calories than all the hay he'll eat to make body heat for the winter.

          Removed three little stitches about 2 weeks post-op. Even though the vet does the ultrasounds through the inside of the leg, the incision was on the outside of the leg just below the hock. At his first US last week, the vet was pleased at the healing seen, especially up high. Blood supply being what it is in this area, there was less improvement lower, although somewhat better. We were cleared to hand graze as much as I wanted to.

          So here we are, one month into an expected 6 months of no turn-out with an expected very slow increase in work load. He's not sound. Most days, he walks fine, no evidence of pain or uneveness. On bad weather days, he's very sore - kinda like an old man with rheumatism. Did the surgery help? Well, yeah, on the ultrasound. Just not sure where we're going from here. Vets, and literature, quoted 85% or better return to previous level of work - which for him is only 2-6. What I can't determine is whether he's supposed to walk sound 100% of the time now, or not.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Melyni View Post
            Interesting thread. I have a horse who is a possible DSLD. In discussions with my vet he suggested using IV stem cells as a treatment. They harvest the stem cells from the horses own fat.

            DOes anyone have any experience of this?

            I'd be fascinated to hear it.
            MW
            That would definitely be worth a try and should have some positive effect.

            There was also an interesting article in The Horse Journal recently about a horse with tendon weakness who improved with extra Vitamin E supplementation.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by BornToRide View Post
              There was also an interesting article in The Horse Journal recently about a horse with tendon weakness who improved with extra Vitamin E supplementation.
              I believe that horse had two conditions, DSLD and EMND. THe EMND responds to Vit E. My take on it is that it was difficult to separate the horse's responses to therapies for the two conditions. But I don't think the article meant to imply that Vit E is commonly theraputic for DSLD.
              "One person's cowboy is another person's blooming idiot" -- katarine

              Spay and neuter. Please.

              Comment


              • #8
                thanks guys

                will defently keep this thread updated on how everything goes!

                havent heard of dsld before will mention it to my vet what does emnd stand for?

                im also in the UK forgot to add earlier.

                im just dreading when she comes round from the op as she is such a clumsy little monkey and a big girl!

                Comment


                • #9
                  My horse had the fasciotomy on both hinds -- he had small tears and enlarged suspensories on both. We did it RIGHT away on diagnosis, although the vets tell me it's a chronic not an acute injury.

                  Recovery was MINIMAL. He came home the same day and on our first bandage change I could hardly find the incisions. No stitches to remove. Stallbound for 1 month, wrapped for the whole time. Month 2, hand walking. Month 3, limited quiet turnout and walking under saddle. Month 4, increased turnout and increased walking under saddle. I'm now at the end of month 5, and trotting up to 10 minutes under saddle, full day turnout.

                  He's been sound from month 3 on -- oh, we did three rounds of shockwave post op as well.

                  Next week we go back for a check up and if all is still good, he gets to back out 24/7 and we cn begin cantering.

                  It was a very straightforward procedure and I'm REALLY glad I did it!!
                  The big man -- my lost prince

                  The little brother, now my main man

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Sweet Pea, check out the Yahoo! group dedicated to DSLD/ESPA (
                    http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/D...ec=group&slk=1

                    Bi-laterial hind suspensory issues are a HUGE red flag for this genetic condition!!! A lot of vets are not up on this!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      DSLD=degenrative suspensory ligament desmitis
                      EMND=equine motor neuron disease

                      DSLD is now believed to be a systemic problem, affecting other connective tissue systems besides the suspensory apparatus; that's often where the first symptoms become noticable, though. I think it's also considered genetic.

                      EMND occurs when horses do not get enough, or are not able to utilize, vitamin E, but symptoms can be reversed when E is supplemented.
                      "One person's cowboy is another person's blooming idiot" -- katarine

                      Spay and neuter. Please.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Just curious but can a horse with a dropped fetlock be fix with surgery? What can they do to fix the leg?
                        I want to be like Barbie because that bitch has everything!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by monstrpony View Post
                          DSLD=degenrative suspensory ligament desmitis

                          DSLD is now believed to be a systemic problem, affecting other connective tissue systems besides the suspensory apparatus; that's often where the first symptoms become noticable, though. I think it's also considered genetic.
                          .
                          I have a 30 year old Arabian gelding and a 21 year old mystery breed mare, both with very established DSLD. You can see the supposed effects of this disease in them in other ways --- the arab has heaves and the mare has skin that stays wrinkled where she bends. I've been told that heart issues can come up. It's very much believed to be genetic. My arab has papers, so he's participated in a study of this disease. The mare very sadly was used as a broodmare before being dumped on a feedlot with her two sons. Both are being watched for signs of DSLD as they grow up. I'm managing both horses well and honestly expect them to die of something else!

                          I've also hosted a Westfalen mare with this disease. She eventually had to be put down as she began wasting badly.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Sweet~Pea View Post
                            Hi

                            my mare has been diagnosed with proximal suspensory desmitis after a grulling 5 months of vets saying there is nothing wrong, she has finally been diagnosed. she has it in both hinds the right is worse!

                            we have decided to go for the operation fasciotomy and nervectomy (sp?)

                            just woundering if anyone has had any experiences of suspensory injuries or the operation and what was your outcome?

                            the op is on monday so any spare jingles would help please!

                            also what did you have to do post surgery?

                            thanks kelly
                            Any updates? Did anyone else try fasciotomy for DSLD? What would the nervectomy do for proximal suspensory desmitis?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Watermark Farm View Post
                              Sweet Pea, check out the Yahoo! group dedicated to DSLD/ESPA (
                              http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/D...ec=group&slk=1

                              Bi-laterial hind suspensory issues are a HUGE red flag for this genetic condition!!! A lot of vets are not up on this!
                              I am working on a herbal treatment fo this. If you are willing to be (or let your horses be) a guinea pig, let me know.
                              MW
                              Melyni (PhD) PAS, Dipl. ACAN.
                              Sign up for the Equine nutrition enewsletter on www.foxdenequine.com
                              New edition of book is out:
                              Horse Nutrition Handbook.

                              www.knabstruppers4usa.com

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by Watermark Farm View Post
                                Sweet Pea, check out the Yahoo! group dedicated to DSLD/ESPA (
                                http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/D...ec=group&slk=1

                                Bi-laterial hind suspensory issues are a HUGE red flag for this genetic condition!!! A lot of vets are not up on this!
                                I am not so sure about this. The list of 'symptoms' is huge and wide ranging - and the list of breeds with a genetic predisposition to it is increasing by the day. What no-one has yet done is to see if there is a common factor in hoof form and early and current lifestyle - most especially long term muscular- skeletal imbalances and chronic pain.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Can anyone give me an up date on how there horses are doing several years post-surgery?

                                  My TB has recently been diagnosed with PSLD and after PRP, shockwave and stall rest, and no improvement, my vet thinks surgery is a viable option. I just wanted to see if anyone else had some surgical advice or post-op thoughts.

                                  Thanks!

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    I had 2 horses with this. Both had surgery. First horse had fasciotomy but not a neurectomy (this was when the surgery was brand-new). It took a PRP treatment and a full year for him to be comfortable enough to start his rehab. He not only returned to prior level of work but exceeded it & had a full career (FEI dressage horse).

                                    Second horse had fasciotomy + neurectomy. She was not as good a candidate from the start. She had chronic inflammation, not a lesion or any actual disruption to the ligament fibers. Apparently these are tougher cases. She did not come sound. I did not give her a full year as the neurectomy should have done the job almost immediately in her case, and she is now a broodmare. Sometimes I wonder if I made the right decision, but when you don't have your own farm, you can't be a collector.

                                    FWIW I believe both horses' issues were caused by working in too-deep footing.

                                    Best of luck to all of you dealing with this.
                                    "You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed." - The Little Prince

                                    Comment

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