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Barefoot transition for the fire breathing beast

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  • Barefoot transition for the fire breathing beast

    Ok, so I need a few pointers on how to do this.

    Horse has been unshoed by her own will since the 11th - pulled RF shoe along with half her hoof wall, I called the farrier and he advised me to pull her LF so she could at least be leveled.

    I ordered some boots which arrived today, but in the meanwhile I got animalintex and a neoprene sheet on her sole and wrapped with Vetwrap and tape. She started getting bit sore on Saturday so we kept her in and just handwalked her.

    Today I went to pick up the boots, got them in her feet, and went for a walk with her in hand. She proceeded to rear onto me, managed to brake the chain/leather lead and ran away. My lovely 172cm, 5 year old, hormonal mare then managed to destroy the gaiters and remove the boots. While running around like a crazy, fire breathing beast she destroyed the remainder of the healthy hoof wall and I then spent the next 20 min rasping it. I then got the boots on her again, without the gaiter. She'll spend the night in her stall, so I have some time to figure this out.

    Farrier will only be here on the 24th.

    How should I proceed meanwhile? She is clearly very comfortable in her new boots, so I am tempted to lunge her tomorrow - she is becoming quite dangerous. Is it a bad idea? I've never transitioned a horse to barefoot so any pointers would be most helpful!
    www.facebook.com/lusitanos4sale

  • #2
    What are you thinking?
    If she is comfortable in boots and you want to lounge her, what are you trying to accomplish?
    Pictures will help you get some help here.
    Charlie Piccione
    Natural Performance Hoof Care

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    • #3
      Time is your friend. You need to have a period of adjustment. Your mare needs to be comfortable and moving. What ever gets you there is correct.

      The feel of the boots may have aggravated her. She sounds very cranky, so slow down and see what works. Keep trying, but let her decide the pace, ie don't lunge her. Let her walk and figure out the nice, new 'sneakers' she is wearing. Thinline makes some lovely soles that could fit in the boots.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by SCMSL View Post
        Ok, so I need a few pointers on how to do this.

        Horse has been unshoed by her own will since the 11th - pulled RF shoe along with half her hoof wall, I called the farrier and he advised me to pull her LF so she could at least be leveled.

        I ordered some boots which arrived today, but in the meanwhile I got animalintex and a neoprene sheet on her sole and wrapped with Vetwrap and tape. She started getting bit sore on Saturday so we kept her in and just handwalked her.

        Today I went to pick up the boots, got them in her feet, and went for a walk with her in hand. She proceeded to rear onto me, managed to brake the chain/leather lead and ran away. My lovely 172cm, 5 year old, hormonal mare then managed to destroy the gaiters and remove the boots. While running around like a crazy, fire breathing beast she destroyed the remainder of the healthy hoof wall and I then spent the next 20 min rasping it. I then got the boots on her again, without the gaiter. She'll spend the night in her stall, so I have some time to figure this out.

        Farrier will only be here on the 24th.

        How should I proceed meanwhile? She is clearly very comfortable in her new boots, so I am tempted to lunge her tomorrow - she is becoming quite dangerous. Is it a bad idea? I've never transitioned a horse to barefoot so any pointers would be most helpful!
        Something to help toughen the sole would be good as she transitions. Paint her soles with venice turpentine...or sometimes vets will mix a concoction of hoof paint containing venice turpentine and other things. It will help with toughening her feet.

        My mustang is very picky about the fit of hoof boots. If they aren't adjusted just right he can get pretty grumpy. He would never do anything bad, but he'll get a very irritated look in his eye and will keep stopping and refusing to move forward until they are adjusted right. You might also need to put a pad in the boot until her feet toughen up.

        Comment


        • #5
          Plus you need to teach her some manners. No matter how she feels, acting up when you are around her or working with her is unacceptable. If she is sound enough, longe her, but watch her, working in a small circle can put stress on legs and hoof if she is compromised or not in shape. Talk to your vet on the phone and take his advice about an exercise regimine. Talk to your farrier and take his advice about her feet, as well. If she lost hoof wall, she might need some reconstructive procedure, not sure what, but I certainly would be looking into how to rebuild the wall so she can grow hoof out while healing from the problems she has. She may need to be shod to protect what she has while the hoof is growing out, so take your farrier's suggestions seriously. Did he say why she's tearing off hoof? Like were her toes too long or her heels underrun? Good luck.
          My warmbloods have actually drunk mulled wine in the past. Not today though. A drunk warmblood is a surly warmblood. - WildandWickedWarmbloods

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          • #6
            Can your farrier put shoes back on her? Glue ons, or patch the foot? And then you turn her out and ride her in good quality bell boots? I have had good luck with the ballistic no turn variety of bell boots.

            If you can get durasole where you are it works to toughen up the soles.

            ETA: I have had the best luck with the "old mac" brand of hoof boots. Seem to fit well, stay on even in mud and I have yet to have a horse take them off. And I have active, expressive horses.
            Unrepentant carb eater

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            • #7
              My best guess is she was freaking out over the boots being on her feet, not because her feet hurt.
              "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by SCMSL View Post
                She is clearly very comfortable in her new boots, so I am tempted to lunge her tomorrow - she is becoming quite dangerous. Is it a bad idea? I've never transitioned a horse to barefoot so any pointers would be most helpful!
                I have to diagree. I would venture with the reaction you described, she is NOT comfortable with them and lunging IN them could get quite dangerous. In situatiosn like this, and you need to handwalk, I'd likely sedate her or consider walking her on SOFT surface (grass).
                Come to the dark side, we have cookies

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                • #9
                  If she were mine, I'd consider a small turnout paddock to let her sort the issue out herself- she may not even run around if she thinks she has been granted "freedom."
                  Does she behave with the boots on in the stall? If so, I'd bet its not the boots that are bothering her, and she is just wild.
                  I agree with posters who say that the behavior you described is not acceptable, no matter WHAT the circumstances. A CTJ meeting might be in order for miss maresy.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Let me get this straight.

                    "She is clearly very comfortable in her new boots, so I am tempted to lunge her tomorrow - she is becoming quite dangerous. Is it a bad idea? I've never transitioned a horse to barefoot so any pointers would be most helpful!"

                    In spite of her losing "half" a hoof wall she's "comfortable?"

                    You put boots on her and notice a gross and dangerous deterioration of behavior?

                    And now you're going to longe her?!?!?!

                    First, this is an emergency if the hoof is damaged to the extent you describe. Get the farrier, and maybe a vet, out there ASAP.

                    Second, forget any sort of work. That's just plain silly. I wouldn't even hand walk without getting some additional information on the damage.

                    Third, learn to read your horse better. You just received a loud and clear communication that something is amiss. I wasn't there and can't tell you just what's amiss. But that your horse has a serious pain issue is manifest. Likely it's that damaged foot (using your description).

                    Again, you have an EMERGENCY. Act accordingly.

                    G.
                    Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão

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                    • Original Poster

                      #11
                      She is fine wearing the boots, stayed with them all night and didn't wreck them - and when she doesn't like something, she makes sure you know it.

                      She is also not in any sort of pain, as confirmed by my vet today. She does have a tender sole as is usual for a horse who has been shoed for at least 2 years. She trots fine with the boots on.

                      I "lunged" her at the arena, which has very nice footing. It wasn't really lunge as I didn't push her at all, just let her do her own thing and used the lead to stop her from acting out.

                      She came to me very lacking in the manners department but fortunately I have a great team by my side who have been able to work with her to help this out. The groom took her out for a hand walk after lunch and she was just fine. I suspect the fact she was locked up for 2 days probably didn't help at all with her attitude either - she has been handwalked inside the arena, with zero noise or distractions, but that obviously isn't enough.

                      The vet admits he isn't very familiar with transitioning to barefoot and obviously advised me to call the farrier. I don't really want to bother him again, specially when he'll be there on Monday.
                      www.facebook.com/lusitanos4sale

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Can you just let her be? GoLet her go back to normal turnout with her boots on so she isnt so wound up. Dont ride or lunge for a week or so. Let her start to get used to her new feet for awhile. Dont be in a rush or you will make things harder on her. Make sure you give her time to walk around without the boots on too. Maybe take her on a bit of a walk in grassy area and increase the time she is without the boots each day. If the footing is good, you can walk her around the ring barefoot too for a bit and that will help toughen things up. Durasole worked really well for me last summer. I agree with the farrier. I woudnt ride her or lunge her until after you see him on Monday. Just turn her out and let her decide how much she wants to move depending on how she thinks her feet feel.

                        Comment

                        • Original Poster

                          #13
                          The thing is, without the gaiters I don't think the boots would last 10 seconds... heck, with gaiters they couldn't handle a walk around the yard! I could put bell boots on her though, just like I did when lunging her today. She would still only be allowed out for the morning - the grounds are flooded so there are several horses sharing the turn out area.
                          www.facebook.com/lusitanos4sale

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                          • #14
                            Oh, I get it now.

                            Well, last year my mare had to transition to barefoot sooner than I wanted to because she did something very similiar to your horse and I didnt have time to get boots but the weather was semi in my favor and it wet/muddy. She was turned out 24/7. I did use durasole and I do think it made a world of difference. I didnt ride her or make her do anything other than hand walk in a grassy area for a week. Then I just hacked her around the farm, staying in the grassy areas until she was ok. Good luck! Its harder on our eyes than it really is on them.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by SCMSL View Post
                              The thing is, without the gaiters I don't think the boots would last 10 seconds... heck, with gaiters they couldn't handle a walk around the yard! I could put bell boots on her though, just like I did when lunging her today. She would still only be allowed out for the morning - the grounds are flooded so there are several horses sharing the turn out area.
                              It sounds like the boots might not fit. My mare does some pretty acrobatic feats in her hoof boots and has yet to lose one. I even forgot to take them off once, so she was turned out in them for over 24 hours and didn't lose them.

                              If she's sound in the arena barefoot, maybe turn her out in there to burn off some steam when she can't be turned out? I also second the Durasole, great stuff.
                              Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                When you chat with the farrier ask about giving casting tape a try.

                                If the mare is sound enough to walk out to the field, I would turn her out. I recently transitioned a bunch of formerly shod horses. If they are comfortable walking around then they go out. Depends on what is in your field footing wise, of course... but I always put the horses out if I can.

                                We haven't seen pictures, but doesn't sound like an 'emergency' to me....
                                "Friend" me !

                                http://www.facebook.com/isabeau.solace

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                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by Isabeau Z Solace View Post
                                  I recently transitioned a bunch of formerly shod horses.

                                  Yeah, and went on to prove to the world with your YouTube "dressage lesson" videos that at least one of them is head-bobbing lame.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Why can't she get shoes on again?
                                    Click here before you buy.

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                                    • Original Poster

                                      #19
                                      She could, when the farrier comes on the 24th. But honestly, if possible (and this is a hard discussion I'm gonna have with him before I make any decisions) I would much rather keep her barefoot. The info about longevity of barefoot horses has actually started to convince me.
                                      www.facebook.com/lusitanos4sale

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                                      • #20
                                        Longevity if they have good feet and a lot of other circumstances. All mine are barefoot, but they have good feet, thick soles, good conformation, thick wall, I don't have rocks etc.
                                        Come to the dark side, we have cookies

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