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Interesting article, link between beet pulp & colic (torsion)

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  • Interesting article, link between beet pulp & colic (torsion)

    Recent peer-reviewed research carried out at Liverpool University highlighted a surprising relationship between feeding sugar beet and the likelihood of a horse suffering from large colon torsion (twisted gut).

    http://www.horseandhound.co.uk/featu...75/315912.html

  • #2
    Did I miss the link to the actual peer-reviewed research article?
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."

    Comment


    • #3
      What Sucker said.

      Comment


      • #4
        Great fanfare of a lead in, and then it dies.

        The more full the intestinal tract is with fiber, the rounder it becomes because it is stuffed, and the less likelihood that it will twist. If sugar beat pulp was the only source of forage, then I could see the problem. However, the writer spends 2/3 of the article extolling the virtues of sugar beet pulp after sucking in the readers with the hook. If you could find and post the study so we could see what types of forage rations they fed to the horse, and how much for its body weight, over how long of a period in time, then it would put the bp issue into perspective.
        "The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits." Albert Einstein

        http://s1098.photobucket.com/albums/...2011%20Photos/

        Comment

        • Original Poster

          #5
          Oh sorry, yes I did look up the original abstract, but didn't post it since I have no access to the full abstract.
          If anyone has access to it please share with us .

          http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/1...12039/abstract

          Comment


          • #6
            "Variables related to nutrition associated with increased risk of LCV were being fed hay, being fed sugar-beet,"


            Based on readings here and other boards with relatively large UK constituents, it seems feeding beep is fairly common there, so it would seem logical that variables would include beep, as well as the (duh) hay. Doesn't make sense.

            Offhand, it doesn't seem like a very good study, since it includes increased height, post-foaling issues, changes in management (which can lead to ulcers which can lead to other issues), changes in the amount of forage fed, etc.

            I'm not at all sure how this leads to looking at beep as an increased risk *shrug*
            ______________________________
            The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

            Comment


            • #7
              Risk factors for large colon volvulus in the UK

              1. J. M. Suthers1,*,
              2. G. L. Pinchbeck1,
              3. C. J. Proudman2,
              4. D. C. Archer1

              Article first published online: 17 FEB 2013
              DOI: 10.1111/evj.12039


              Keywords:

              • horse;
              • large colon volvulus (LCV);
              • strangulating;
              • survival;
              • colic



              Summary

              Reasons for performing study

              Risk factors for large colon volvulus (LCV) in the horse have not been previously reported. Knowledge of these risk factors may allow the introduction of measures that could be taken to minimise the incidence of LCV.


              Objectives

              To investigate risk factors for LCV in the horse.


              Methods

              A prospective, multicentre, unmatched case-control study was conducted over a 24 month period in the UK. Data on 69 cases and 204 control horses, from 4 veterinary hospitals, were obtained via telephone questionnaires. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify associations between horse and management-level variables and the likelihood of LCV.


              Results

              Increasing height, multiple colic episodes in the previous 12 months and mares, with a greater odds ratio in mares that had previously foaled, were associated with increased risk of LCV. Receiving medication (excluding anthelmintic treatment) in the previous 7 days and quidding behaviour were also associated with increased risk. Management-level variables associated with greater risk of LCV were an increase in the hours of stabling in the previous 14 days, an increasing number of horses on the premises, and 3 or more people involved in the horse's care. Variables related to nutrition associated with increased risk of LCV were being fed hay, being fed sugar-beet, a change in pasture in the previous 28 days, and an alteration in the amount of forage fed in the last 7 days.


              Conclusions

              This study has identified factors that may assist in the recognition of horses with increased risk of LCV and factors that might be altered to minimise the incidence of LCV.


              Potential relevance

              Clinicians can use this information to identify horses at risk of LCV and to provide evidence-based advice to owners of these horses
              "The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits." Albert Einstein

              http://s1098.photobucket.com/albums/...2011%20Photos/

              Comment

              • Original Poster

                #8
                This abstract doesn't tell us much at all either I guess. I wonder if the full version is clearer on precisely how much beetpulp they fed along with what.

                Probably one of those, "hey interesting finding, but needs more research".

                Like JB says, so many people US & UK feed beetpulp, or beetpulp based feeds (like TC senior). Not heard it being an issue or no one every made the link.

                Comment


                • #9
                  The HH writer is a drama-llama. Multiple factors involved here, all well-known to contribute to colic.
                  "The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits." Albert Einstein

                  http://s1098.photobucket.com/albums/...2011%20Photos/

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    It wasn't an experimental study--it was based on the results of a questionnaire.
                    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

                    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.

                    Comment

                    • Original Poster

                      #11
                      Oh, I c, well that leaves rooooooom for questionable interpretation.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Lieslot View Post
                        Oh, I c, well that leaves rooooooom for questionable interpretation.
                        Oh no, COTH has gone text speak.


                        So the person who wrote the article for HH truly has no idea what peer reviewed research is then?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I'm in the Uk. I've fed beetpulp without problem to stabled horses for years (touchwood!). I have a few horses, one of which is a rising 3yr filly who has beetpulp and chaff feed 4 times a day, spends most of the time in her stable, been on doxycycline for last 7 months for daily low grade colic (now gone hopefully, just finished the doxy), has hay, has teeth problems (diastema's, now made wider) and was quidding really badly at one point. I am the only person who looks after her though! If she goes down with LCV then i will blame the beetpulp!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Saw Ghazzu was the most recent post and scrolled to the bottom - then worked my way backwards. Sounds like the paper this is written on (or the bandwidth it occupies) is worth more than the "findings."

                            The management of the horses, IMHO, is of GREAT importance when considering causes of colic (whatever the type). While it happens even under the best of management.... I look hardest at the daily management having the greatest impact on a lot of this. I'm thinking specifically of my new mare and how when she arrived she was on a diet of sweet feed with beet pulp mixed in - never soaked, just fed straight. She was cranky and hateful the first 3-4 weeks - girthy, kicked, etc. We never gave her any of her old feed and just fed good quality grass hay for a week before weaning her onto a concentrate pelleted feed. This study - with so many management variables - means little to nothing.

                            I love the "potential relevance" portion... Here's some evidence based advice to horse owners: Institute good management practices. And if you're going to feed beet pulp, soak it, for Pete's sake.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              It is peer-reviewed research.
                              It was published in EVJ, which is a pretty respectable journal.
                              It's merely a statistical analysis of horses presenting to referral hospitals with LCV vs. horses which visitied the hospital for other reasons as a control group.

                              The authors looked at what differences might exist between the two groups.
                              Many, including feeding beet pulp, feeding hay, size of horse, previous colic, number of care takers, etc. were deemed to be statistically significant.

                              Doesn't mean feeding beet pulp will *cause* LCV.
                              "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

                              ...just settin' on the Group W bench.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by Ghazzu View Post
                                It is peer-reviewed research.
                                It was published in EVJ, which is a pretty respectable journal.
                                It's merely a statistical analysis of horses presenting to referral hospitals with LCV vs. horses which visitied the hospital for other reasons as a control group.

                                The authors looked at what differences might exist between the two groups.
                                Many, including feeding beet pulp, feeding hay, size of horse, previous colic, number of care takers, etc. were deemed to be statistically significant.

                                Doesn't mean feeding beet pulp will *cause* LCV.
                                Exactly. And I'm not saying the study is completely without value taken as a whole. But with regard to the thread title... I've kept plenty of horses on beet pulp over the years. None of them coliced. What correlations are there between all sorts of things and the incidence of colic (understanding that correlation is not causation)? I think this study would be more relevant if there were less variables...but this is horse world where everything is variable.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  This is a little like a study where they ask prisoners what they ate for lunch as children and then conclude that peanut butter sandwiches cause criminal behavior.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Not exactly. A statistically significant association would mean that horses who experienced LCV were more likely to be fed sugar beet than those who did not experience LCV. That said, a case-control study like this can't establish cause, only association. An observational study like this could guide a follow-up experimental study where the actual feed could be manipulated.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Yes, and if you found that 85% of the men in prison were fed peanut butter sandwiches as a kid, you could infer that peanut butter sandwiches cause the behavior... if, as someone stated earlier in this thread, a high percentage of horses in the UK are fed beet pulp, then it would not be surprising if a high percentage of horses that colicked in the UK where being fed beet pulp.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        If you look at the study as a whole, and there is a list of say, 20 things that have a positive correlation, you could use that information to your advantage to
                                        possibly reduce the odds of LCV.

                                        For instance, if your horse management practices included 15 of 25 things positively correlated with LCV, you mihgt consider changing some of them.

                                        Not necessarily from the study, but just to illustrate:
                                        no turn out
                                        different person feeding every evening
                                        previous history of colic
                                        beet pulp in feed
                                        only exercised every other day.

                                        Well, you can't do anything about the previous history, but maybe you can change the idea that there is a different person feeding every night (perhaps you're in a co-op situation--maybe you could go over and feed your own horse every night. And have the horse ridden more frequently.) You might consider moving the horse to a facility with turnout.

                                        And so forth.

                                        The H&H article drew inferences that it really shouldn't have.
                                        "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

                                        ...just settin' on the Group W bench.

                                        Comment

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