• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

update post #112 Laminitis woes/vaccine reaction

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #61
    HUGE JINGLES & AO for this mare and her family during this horrible time period ~

    HUGE Jingles & AO for this mare and her family during this tough tough time period ~

    Jingles laced with strength and patience for ALL ~
    Zu Zu Bailey " IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE ! "

    Comment


    • #62
      Jingling too. Lying down is actually a good thing, encourage her to lie down. (I think OP mentioned that maresie is standing up, as if that is a good thing?) You really, really want the horse to spend time off of the feet. Thanks for explaining the high heels thing; that actually makes sense even though at first it seemed counter-intuitive.
      Jeanie
      RIP Sasha, best dog ever, pictured shortly before she died, Death either by euthanasia or natural causes is only the end of the animal inhabiting its body; I believe the spirit lives on.

      Comment


      • #63
        Here's an explanation from Nanric (manufacturer of Ultimates) about the high heels:

        "Providing this device as an emergency aid can greatly reduce or prevent displacement (rotation and/or sinking) of the coffin bone. Extensive venogram studies have shown a direct relationship between DDF laxity and improved circulation to the laminae and sole corium. Enhancing blood flow to compromised feet is the first step to enhancing the healing environment. Time is always of the essence. For best results, always consider acute laminitis an emergency, regardless of how quickly the horse responds to medication."

        I've seen the difference on venograms...it can be a huge difference in blood flow.

        Comment


        • #64
          Sending weekend Jingles for some rest and recovery for this mare and her family ~

          Sending Jingles for some rest and recovery this weekend for ALL ~ AO ~
          Zu Zu Bailey " IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE ! "

          Comment


          • #65
            I have never used this guy but have followed some of the horses he has worked on. I am following Ollie of Frog Pond Farm right now who this gentleman has worked on. If you can, facebook Esco Buff. He may be able to help. Some of the horses he has worked on, if I had owned them I would have put them down. But when you look at the after xray pics its amazing. I havent found anything bad posted about him. Maybe give that a try? I will keep your mare in my thoughts. Being preggers kind of complicates things a bit. Hopefully she will pull through with a healthy happy youngster.

            Comment


            • #66
              Originally posted by OBXPony View Post
              I have never used this guy but have followed some of the horses he has worked on. I am following Ollie of Frog Pond Farm right now who this gentleman has worked on. If you can, facebook Esco Buff. He may be able to help. Some of the horses he has worked on, if I had owned them I would have put them down. But when you look at the after xray pics its amazing. I havent found anything bad posted about him. Maybe give that a try? I will keep your mare in my thoughts. Being preggers kind of complicates things a bit. Hopefully she will pull through with a healthy happy youngster.
              This guy is awesome! My farrier consults with him about my horse. Truly amazing and his success rate is outstanding!

              Comment


              • #67
                Dalemma - I would think peat moss would act the same - only by compression, not flowing? A thick bed is quite spongy so the hoof would sink the same though maybe it wouldn't support the sole as much?

                Comment


                • #68
                  Are you icing her feet/legs? There have been a few studies that have shown some success. Its more of an acute thing but if she's still having changes I would give it a try.

                  Also in regards to the cox-2 study how did they determine the detrimental handling effects for pregnant women? *can't see the link you posted* since it's no longer used in human med were they just people in the study or older case reports?

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    Originally posted by rodawn
                    It's a good question and I'm not entirely sure I have 100% of a grasp on it,
                    If you trust the professionals you have hired to help your horse, then understanding their theories and protocols is irrelevant.

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      Originally posted by Tom Bloomer View Post
                      If you trust the professionals you have hired to help your horse, then understanding their theories and protocols is irrelevant.
                      Yes, but "an educated consumer is our best customer" is something I wholeheartedly believe in. So long as the education is not a dogmatic "I know better because I Googled it and all you doctors are idiots" sort of attitude.
                      Click here before you buy.

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        Wow, I'm so sorry that you and your mare are going through this, what a nightmare. My horse foundered just over 2 years ago and reading this makes me want to cry.

                        I can tell you that the soft ride boots made my horse go from a cripple to being able to walk. I couldn't believe it, I now call them the magic boots. They offered the support he needed. He lived in them for many months.

                        Like you, I tried to read and speak with as many people as possible. The yahoo cushings group totally overwhelmed me.

                        Best of luck to you and your mare.

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          Originally posted by deltawave View Post
                          Yes, but "an educated consumer is our best customer" is something I wholeheartedly believe in.
                          NO KIDDING. The protocol of blindly trusting and never questioning a professional is not a good idea. Also, a good professional will try to inform a client if that client asks questions, with clear, concise answers to queries.

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            The protocol of blindly trusting and never questioning a professional is not a good idea.
                            IME it is a very individual thing, and somewhat generational. For better or for worse, there are a good many people who grew up to not question "authority" and to put their faith in professionals. And there are a good many people who grew up thinking quite the opposite. Neither is entirely wrong or right, but there are individuals on each end of the spectrum and many somewhere in between.

                            Sometimes it is alien and bewildering to an individual and they want no part of hearing long explanations of complicated things, and one is torn between being somewhat patronizing and paternalistic vs. trying to convey the necessary information. Others question every last thing and one struggles to find any sort of trust. My personal feeling is that blind trust is rarely good (although we ask our kids and animals to have it!) but the willingness and ability to have faith in a professional, even if things go beyond what one can personally grasp and understand, is extremely helpful.
                            Click here before you buy.

                            Comment


                            • #74
                              Originally posted by deltawave View Post
                              IME it is a very individual thing, and somewhat generational. For better or for worse, there are a good many people who grew up to not question "authority" and to put their faith in professionals. And there are a good many people who grew up thinking quite the opposite. Neither is entirely wrong or right, but there are individuals on each end of the spectrum and many somewhere in between.

                              Sometimes it is alien and bewildering to an individual and they want no part of hearing long explanations of complicated things, and one is torn between being somewhat patronizing and paternalistic vs. trying to convey the necessary information. Others question every last thing and one struggles to find any sort of trust. My personal feeling is that blind trust is rarely good (although we ask our kids and animals to have it!) but the willingness and ability to have faith in a professional, even if things go beyond what one can personally grasp and understand, is extremely helpful.
                              That's why I stated that clear, CONCISE answers are important, and kids and animals have nothing to do with the current discussion involving a professional/ client relationship. I had a molecular biology professor who could describe her experiments to layman very well. Granted, she's a very smart lady, but she proves that it's possible to package complicated concepts into highly digestible packets of information.

                              Some patients do just want to be told what to do, but DH (family physician) always outlines their options and lets them know that the ultimate decision is up to them. Such patients will then ask him "Well then what would you do?" and he will answer.

                              I'd rather be a well-informed client than not because every professional has lapses in judgement and makes mistakes.

                              I've put my faith in professionals and gotten burned more than once (by different professionals in different fields), so I am not one to blindly trust.

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                Prayers for your mare and for you!

                                Why are they not recommending prascend? It stopped the pulses in my mare in a day or two.
                                Last edited by pixie; Mar. 19, 2013, 08:53 PM.

                                Comment


                                • #76
                                  it's possible to package complicated concepts into highly digestible packets of information
                                  Definitely. Assuming the listener isn't hard of hearing, mildly demented, miserably sick and hasn't slept in three days!

                                  It is very definitely NOT on the medical school curriculum. One has to figure it out the hard way.
                                  Click here before you buy.

                                  Comment


                                  • #77
                                    Originally posted by deltawave View Post
                                    Yes, but "an educated consumer is our best customer" is something I wholeheartedly believe in. So long as the education is not a dogmatic "I know better because I Googled it and all you doctors are idiots" sort of attitude.
                                    The essay the OP wrote on her less than 100% understanding was about 90% errors. The essay proves is that the OP didn't take good notes and got the terminology and the mechanics and the theory wrong. That nobody else among the hoof expert dilettantes caught the errors and pointed them out is quite telling of how well educated this group is.

                                    Comment


                                    • #78
                                      Originally posted by grayarabpony View Post
                                      . . . I had a molecular biology professor who could describe her experiments to layman very well. Granted, she's a very smart lady, but she proves that it's possible to package complicated concepts into highly digestible packets of information.
                                      And one hour later every layman would be unable to accurately explain to another layman anything that they were told unless they took damned good notes. Very few people can retain that kind of information without studying and reviewing it several times.

                                      Comment


                                      • #79
                                        Originally posted by Tom Bloomer View Post
                                        That nobody else among the hoof expert dilettantes caught the errors and pointed them out is quite telling of how well educated this group is.
                                        Perhaps nobody is brave enough to try to correct things for fear that a few less than tactful posters will rain holy terror down on them if there's one little misstep.
                                        ______________________________
                                        The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

                                        Comment


                                        • #80
                                          Originally posted by JB View Post
                                          The "high heels/heel lift" caught my eye. Why was that prescribed? That seems so counterproductive to a "moving" foot as it really increases pressure on the toe I'm not knocking you, just trying to understand something that most laminitis/founder experts say is a huge no-no, and why it's a good thing in this case

                                          Still jingling very madly that she stabilizes soon so she can start to recover!

                                          My show mare also foundered about 2 years ago. After 1 year with heel lifts she is now back to normal and getting worked on hard surfaces without any issues. No idea why it works but farrier has worked with a vet for years and says he's never had this fail yet.
                                          Now in Kentucky

                                          Comment

                                          Working...
                                          X